PDA

View Full Version : First boat - Summer Breeze (kind of)



ecnal
04-09-2013, 08:02 PM
Hello! Found this forum and wanted to share the first boat I've made, the Summer Breeze from simplicityboats.com (http://www.simplicityboats.com). Started in May of last year, going to be finished this month. A long time for a simple boat, but I probably averaged about three hours/week on it. Didn't document it too much, unfortunately, but I had fun and learned a LOT. Plus I had the excuse to buy like $400 in tools.

I got the idea of adding sailing bits and a full-length keel/skeg halfway through. I did not draw full-size plans for this boat, and the sailing parts/keel I did not draw plans at all for - just measuring and putting it together in my head. It's a little heavier than I would like, partially because of the over-engineered (but already screwed and glued and I ain't redoing it) mast box, partially because of the keel, and partially because of the galvanized steel mast (until I can get my hands on an aluminum one). Nevertheless, I can still pick it up (without the mast on, of course) and move it if I have to without hurting myself too much, and with a minimal amount of cussing.

As you can see in one of the photos, I used small wedges instead of one long strip. Reasoning was simple, I don't own a table saw. Hopefully I'll never hit anything head on. You can also see that I built it in a basement. I would not recommend it.

The whole boat (minus tools) cost less that $200 to build. Most of it was scrap. I opted not to fiberglass it and finished with external all weather oil-based acrylic latex (and primer). 2 coats of primer, 3 coats of paint outside (keel got 5 coats), 2 coats inside. We'll see how it does.

Water test should be this weekend. I'm excited! Still need to make the sail (tarp sail!).

Any input is more than welcome!

Some photos! (sorry for the flood of them):

http://i.imgur.com/oyPBK50.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/PSf66U5.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/efBmhCi.jpghttp://i.imgur.com/M4NMNlP.jpghttp://i.imgur.com/qxGFXrh.jpghttp://i.imgur.com/VlfF2pk.jpg

ecnal
04-09-2013, 08:03 PM
More pics:

http://i.imgur.com/Pb3QUHX.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/EmNqx7k.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/Iuya2qM.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/y8kI8mW.jpg

ecnal
04-09-2013, 08:03 PM
Aaaand a few more.

http://i.imgur.com/HhurBif.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/ue7uqPi.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/yZgNQbw.jpg

Badger
04-09-2013, 09:33 PM
Very nice design and workmanship. From where are you ?

You could sneak up on some big fish with it also.

Nice covered cuddy foreward to keep items dry and out of the direct sunlight.

ecnal
04-09-2013, 09:38 PM
Very nice design and workmanship. From where are you ?

You could sneak up on some big fish with it also.

Nice covered cuddy foreward to keep items dry and out of the direct sunlight.

Thanks! I live in Plymouth, MA.

You can actually curl up inside the little cuddy if the need ever arose, however it's not the most comfy. But it would do in a pinch if it started to rain or something.

Although, I feel like a tarp pitched over the boom would make a much more spacious and dryer hideout :)

I plan to use it to spearfish off of. I'm probably going to throw a 30ft/lb trolling motor on it, though I'm not 100%. Still gotta go through all the bull of registering a home-made boat if I want an engine on it.

Sea Dreams
04-10-2013, 07:22 AM
Nice job. I just built my first boat, a summer breeze, and haven't got the sailing parts done yet. I might not build them for this one but I'm real interested to hear how your version works out. I especially like the covered cuddy. I still want to try something like that on mine. Might just be a cardboard test but I still want a tiny cabin on a small boat someday.

Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

Lewisboater
04-10-2013, 08:24 AM
Like the boat... but be wary of that mast. That is a lot of weight in the wrong place. You would be better off with a wood mast made out of some 1x2s or 1x3s. If that goes over for whatever reason it will keep right on going over until the mast is at the lowest point. Interesting rudder setup.

capefox
04-10-2013, 10:17 AM
Well done. Is the end grain on the ply sealed? Some of the photos make it look like the ply is exposed.

ecnal
04-10-2013, 01:21 PM
Like the boat... but be wary of that mast. That is a lot of weight in the wrong place. You would be better off with a wood mast made out of some 1x2s or 1x3s. If that goes over for whatever reason it will keep right on going over until the mast is at the lowest point. Interesting rudder setup.

I am wary of the mast. I have considered adding weights in the keel (small spaced pockets of poured lead, epoxy sealed) but I'm gonna see how she does first. The boom is aluminum (real boom, recycled) for what its worth. I also figure that a battery, should I choose a small trolling motor, will help add a few lbs of stability if placed correctly.


Well done. Is the end grain on the ply sealed? Some of the photos make it look like the ply is exposed.

I sure as hell hope not! Everything was sanded down and primed and painted. Only time will tell at this point. The bare wood (rubrails, etc) were treated with about 8-10 coats of tung oil. Inside has several coats of paint as well. David Beade swears by a few good coats of external acrylic latex. We'll see.

capefox
04-10-2013, 05:53 PM
I'm impressed by the way you've thought through everything. Well done on your build.

ecnal
04-16-2013, 02:54 PM
Did not have anyone on shore to take photos, but I did manage to get her in the water yesterday and it went pretty well!

The galvenized mast was replaced with a temporary, untreated length of 1 1/2" poplar for the test. A real mast is slowly under construction using better wood! The sail was made with a tarp, which worked splendid! It will need to be re-made when the new mast is ready, with a slightly different shape to keep the boom elevated a little more - currently when coming about, it is at the perfect height to hit you in the face. 6" higher should let it whiz by overhead without issue and a taller mast will compensate for overall sail area.

The rudder, unfortunately, broke apart when we (my friend and I) were about 150 yards out to sea (also known as: in the safety of the harbor :). The wood I used for the top of the rudder was cut with the grain running lengthwise and simply was too small/weak to handle the stresses of being in the water. Needless to say, it did not make it. It was a little unnerving however we simply put an oar in the rudder holder and that got us out and back with no issues, though it was a little tough to use (much shorter handle == less mechanical advantage. The rudder will be redesigned much simpler, without any sort of kick-up mechanism like it has now.

The wind was not our friend, however. It was blowing north-west and as we were launching east, we had to tack more than I would have liked to get where we were going. However it all worked out well and we were underway at a steady 4-5 knots.

All in all, it was a success! The water was pretty cold but that's normal for Massachusetts in early spring.

Sea Dreams
04-16-2013, 04:12 PM
I have a few questions about your boat. First, how tall is your mast? Is the sail the shape shown in your earlier picture (triangle shape)? Do you have a leeboard on this boat or is your keel/skeg enough?

And, a request. If you get a chance and think about it next time out, could you try to paddle it with a single paddle? My summer breeze just about goes in circles when I paddle it and I'm wondering if the longer and taller keel makes a difference in how it tracks.

Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

ecnal
04-16-2013, 04:27 PM
Brian,

Mast was a 10' tall poplar pole. Mast came out of the boat 8'6, sail was 7'5 tall, 7.5 wide. Yes, I used a triangle shape. The skeg/keel did fine, however it did still drift a bit - not enough, in my mind, to warrant a leeboard.

I did some small maneuvering with one paddle and it went pretty well, however I did have to put in much more effort that with a kayak or canoe.

Sea Dreams
04-16-2013, 05:00 PM
Thanks for the info. I know the summer breeze was not meant to be paddled but rowed. I hoped mine would track a little better than it does. My little 9 foot kayak doesn't work very well either unless you alternate sides each stroke (unless you want to turn). I once rented a longer kayak and it tracked great and was faster but a little harder to steer. Can't remember but it probably had a longer keel.

Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian