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View Full Version : Two Faerings for sail and oar.



keyhavenpotterer
02-25-2013, 02:59 AM
Thanks to Jeff Larnder for the heads up on Facebook.

John Harris at CLC has blogged these new designs which are focussed on sail and oar coastal cruising and island hopping. It's a very interesting blog and well worth reading through. http://www.clcboats.com/life-of-boats-blog/two-faerings-for-sail-and-oar-chesapeake-light-craft-faering.html

This bit is particularly interesting about lining off, Viking style.

"My first few attempts looked cartoonish, until I divined the peculiar line-off scheme of a proper faering's planks. Instead of planks of even width that sweep up to the ends in nice concentric curves, like an American Swampscott dory, the sheer plank on a faering is wide amidships and pinched at the bow. This was counter intuitive to me as an American designer, until my software "unpeeled the banana" and I eyeballed the flat planks. Those Vikings! Arranging the plank line-off that way means that the four planks making up each side of the faering hull have only a little bit of sweep. This saves a lot of material. Done like a round-sided dory, you end up with deeply-curved individual planks, shaped like a single parenthesis, which waste a lot of wood."

http://www.clcboats.com/images/blog/2013/faering/scot16.jpg

This is the longer version specifically tailored to one clients requirements, sliding seat etc. For some reason the centreboard looks too small and too far forward to me. Perhaps it's ok because it only half lowers.
http://www.clcboats.com/images/blog/2013/faering/wp/Faering-Cruiser-Plan-and-Elevation-550x460.jpg

http://www.clcboats.com/images/blog/2013/faering/wp/Faering-Cruiser-Lug1-289x300.jpg

It's further back in this non cabin version

http://www.clcboats.com/images/blog/2013/faering/CLC-Faering-Construction.jpg

Whilst people might be baulking at the rear cabin here is the designs inspiration

http://www.clcboats.com/images/blog/2013/faering/wp/Old-Norse-550x412.jpg

James McMullen
02-25-2013, 08:27 AM
Fascinating! Add a mizzen and I'm all in.

keyhavenpotterer
02-25-2013, 09:47 AM
Fascinating! Add a mizzen and I'm all in.

Looking at the first drawing posted, there is a red lined drawing of a sleeping man. Looks like there might just be room for a mizzen mast to miss the end of his feet. Probably easier to use on the open version. The cabin version may need tha sail area kept forward so the centre board can also be kept as far forward as possible to give room for everything.

Brian

skaraborgcraft
02-25-2013, 10:38 AM
I always find it highly amusing when "old" technology wins out when "he peeled the banana".

The original boats are fast and able, even with a square rig. It may seem too unusual for some, but again, ocean rowing boats have an aft cabin, so maybe there is a market.

JimD
02-25-2013, 10:41 AM
Nice looking boats in their own right, and perhaps its only my lack of understanding of the type, but somehow they don't quite say 'faering' to me.

Yeadon
02-25-2013, 10:59 AM
Getting your weight aft on a run will be tough with that cabin. Cool boat, overall, though.

skaraborgcraft
02-25-2013, 11:07 AM
Getting your weight aft on a run will be tough with that cabin. Cool boat, overall, though.

Next upgrade will be an astrodome and tiller lines running through the cabin and access to the mainsheet.....no need to leave the comfort of your berth....

rogue
02-25-2013, 12:33 PM
Very cool design...I'd like to see CLC come out with a kit..

gilberj
02-25-2013, 03:06 PM
Is there any foot room in the sleeping area?? Cool concept but not sure it really works.

skaraborgcraft
02-25-2013, 03:20 PM
Does not look as though there will be a kit or plans. They show photos of the 19ft version, but i dont see the details on their site. What is the beam?

stromborg
02-25-2013, 09:50 PM
From the blog: " For the moment, the CLC Faering kit is on hold, until we find time to build one from start to finish in our shop, snapping photos the whole way. Only basic plans exist, and even then nothing that the folks at home could work from, alas. It would certainly be an expensive kit, mitigated only by the fact that it's the only relatively easy-to-build faering in the world."

"...only relatively easy-to-build faering in the world." Iain Oughtred might disagree.

But, a cool looking concept. I like the idea of putting the cabin aft, with no mast or center board to get in the way it would probably be fairly spacious. (At least until James sticks a mizzen back there!) Looks like the beam is about 1/4 of the LOA.

Ben Fuller
02-25-2013, 10:07 PM
Getting your weight aft on a run will be tough with that cabin. Cool boat, overall, though.

Actually we have found that for planing double enders you want to shift weight not as far aft as in fat sterned boats as you will drive the stern down. About 3/4-7/8 the way back seems to work best in International Canoes on the high tech end and in my ducker and Ran Tan and the faering on the low tech side.

Yeadon
02-25-2013, 10:16 PM
That's a great point, Ben. I've experienced similar "planing" (term very very loosely used here) on Big Food when I'm about 2/3rd to 3/4-ish back in the boat. Even so, I don't think you can get your weight anywhere near your recommendation with that aft cabin. Though ... maybe that extra weight of the cabin deck would help?



http://www.clcboats.com/images/blog/2013/faering/wp/Faering-Cruiser-Lug1-289x300.jpg

keyhavenpotterer
02-26-2013, 03:07 AM
Scaling from the drawings, beam of the 22' version looks to be about 5'3" and just under 5' for the 19'6" version.

You do need to be sitting around the middle of the boat in these fine ended faerings. I was lucky to sail one a while back. An Oughtred Elf. The builder was an experienced woodworker but not an experienced sailor. He made both the long push pull tiller and the standard tiller without an extension. He was finding that he simply could not tack her, and always had to gybe. We went out together me sitting well forward and we could tack her ok. The problem was he was using the std tiller and sitting too far back and needed to use the long push pull tiller and sit much farther forward.

I took her out on my own, and in the light winds went forward to adjust the sail settings and low and behold she tacked on her own. So we went from not be able to tack her to tacking her just by weight transfer. Lovely boat, I liked her a lot.

If the aesthetics do look ok with the aft cabin on this new design, she could be a very nice boat indeed. Very pleasurable to be in.

I wonder if John Harris could release a low sales volume design like this as a Beta design to other builders? Looks like a small number have been built and after all all the Oughtred and Welsford boats are built with just the plans and help on the forum. Starting from a kit, plus S+T should be fine. It's too promising a design not to be made available and built.

JimD
02-26-2013, 10:50 AM
it's the only relatively easy-to-build faering in the world."That's quite a claim.

gilberj
02-26-2013, 11:01 AM
I had an old double ended rowing boat that I rigged for sailing for a while. I used to sail her without a rudder by moving my weight around. My inspiration was stories about St Lawrence skiffs racing like that.
How much head room is there in that little aft cabin. I am inclined to think that I would need at least sitting head room, aft, say under the hatch for the concept to be workable.

skaraborgcraft
02-26-2013, 01:18 PM
Cheers Brian, same beam as my Vattern snipa; im wondering what an extra 5ft would do for stability. Im thinking it may be a handfull for a solo rower in a strong wind.

They already have the ply patterns for plank shapes and a couple of bulkheads, a lot of us can move onwards with just that. I think if people were seriously interested in the concept,some Oughtred designs will be changed, and my first thought was an Atkins Valgerda,have the plans, which is already 19ft and 6mm ply, just an idea......

Ben Fuller
02-26-2013, 07:46 PM
[QUOTE=Yeadon;3710331]That's a great point, Ben. I've experienced similar "planing" (term very very loosely used here) on Big Food when I'm about 2/3rd to 3/4-ish back in the boat. Even so, I don't think you can get your weight anywhere near your recommendation with that aft cabin. Though ... maybe that extra weight of the cabin deck would help?
[/QUOTE

I suspect that the power to weight ratio of this boat would preclude planing.

ThorBue
02-27-2013, 08:37 AM
I think one should take a broader perspective on the "it's the only relatively easy-to-build faering in the world."

If someone is all new to boatbuilding, Harris can be quite right - if someone has spend years off surfing this forum and others, maybee even build a boat himself, glued clinker or "real wood" just doesn't seem that scaring anymore....

Yeadon
02-27-2013, 11:10 AM
CLC is a great option for people who don't feel confident building from scratch. So is Pygmy, etc.

JimD
02-27-2013, 11:33 AM
Here's a plywood faering that shouldn't be too hard to build. And it even looks like a faering.



KARI 2 FAERING



http://www.selway-fisher.com/Kari2d1.gif
http://www.selway-fisher.com/Kari2p1.jpgThe example above is by Jose Granell


http://www.selway-fisher.com/Karip1.jpg

We were asked to develop the plank shapes for a replica of a 4 oared Faering from some lines that had been taken off the boat some while back. The client was the husband of the Great Granddaughter of the owner who had the original built in 1892 for the sum of 70 Kroner (£3.10.0). The original is now in a museum and still in excellent condition, having been used by several generations for holidays and a few long expeditions. We have now taken the original lines and produced construction drawings for modern stitch and epoxy construction using plywood. The hull is a close resemblance of the original but we have given her a deeper keel to enhance her windward performance (the originals often used a dagger board) and a larger rig. The plank shapes are shown on the drawings along with frame shapes. A fascinating and very beautiful boat. LOD 18’; Beam 5’4’’.






Kari 2 Particulars



LOA
18'
5.49m


Beam
5'4"
1.63m


Hull Mid Depth
1' 7 1/4"
0.49m


Draft
1'6"
0.45m


Sail Area
114 sq.ft
10.64 sq.m


Approx. Dry Weight
325 lbs
147 kg



Hull Shape

Round bilge with 3 planks per side


Construction Methods
Stitch and tape and strip plank


Major plywood requirements for hull
12 sheets of 9mm plywood


Guidance Use
3-4 adults


Drawing/Design Package
6 x A1 drawings + 12 x A4 instruction sheets


Additions and alterations included with the plans
Moulds/jig for strip plank
Square sail rig







http://www.selway-fisher.com/Kari2d1.gif

James McMullen
02-27-2013, 04:53 PM
Problem is, that deeper keel on the Kari, or the similar keel on Atkin's Valgerda is just wetted surface instant death to pleasant rowing. And a faering that isn't a rowboat first and foremost really isn't a faering at all to my mind. "Faering" = "four-oaring", a rowboat that can pull two pairs of oars. The best way to take a beachable rowboat and turn it into a sail & oar boat is with a retractable centerboard or daggerboard, not with that clumsy, long, draggy salient keel. That keel is a terribly inefficient windward shape for its frictional surface area.

JimD
02-27-2013, 04:57 PM
Problem is, that deeper keel on the Kari, or the similar keel on Atkin's Valgerda is just wetted surface instant death to pleasant rowing. And a faering that isn't a rowboat first and foremost really isn't a faering at all to my mind. "Faering" = "four-oaring", a rowboat that can pull two pairs of oars. The best way to take a beachable rowboat and turn it into a sail & oar boat is with a retractable centerboard or daggerboard, not with that clumsy, long, draggy salient keel. That keel is a terribly inefficient windward shape for its frictional surface area.Yes, I wondered why the long keel? Take it off and replace with center or daggerboard.

James McMullen
02-27-2013, 05:02 PM
Absolutely! Shades of Stevenson Weekender grade performance otherwise. <shudder!>

JimD
02-27-2013, 05:10 PM
Absolutely! Shades of Stevenson Weekender grade performance otherwise. <shudder!>From the write up I get the impression its something of a replica boat and its possible the designer was not given the option of a board.

Alan H
02-27-2013, 05:12 PM
Pretty, though. And look, it's got a headsail combined with a lug rig. Heh. The Drawing doesn't show stays but the photograph of the boat, does. I'm thinking that would suggest that the owner/operator intends for the mast to stay up pretty much all the time, thus this is primarily a sailing boat, secondarily a rowing one. The long keel is consistent with that.

....or maybe it's the other way 'round, the rig is consistent with the keel.

skaraborgcraft
02-28-2013, 09:21 AM
I have to confess that even though i like Valgerda, that keel would go and be replaced by a board, either a dagger or otherwise. The Fisher design was drawn for a specific customers wants, hence the keel.

JimD
02-28-2013, 10:33 AM
Its also been said by a forumite with personal experience that Valgerda is a very poor sailer.

gilberj
02-28-2013, 10:44 AM
Tony Skidmore a sometimes yacht designer here on the west coast, built a Valgerda, which he decked with a cabin. I do not remember what he did with the keel, but he certainly had a lot more sail area in nicely proportioned gaff cutter rig. He cruised the coast for a couple of summers in this boat.

JimD
02-28-2013, 11:03 AM
Tony Skidmore a sometimes yacht designer here on the west coast, built a Valgerda, which he decked with a cabin. I do not remember what he did with the keel, but he certainly had a lot more sail area in nicely proportioned gaff cutter rig. He cruised the coast for a couple of summers in this boat.
Would like to see a pic of that. Sounds fascinating.

keyhavenpotterer
05-27-2013, 02:25 PM
Just found the build blog for the UK prototype boat shown in the opening post.

https://forum.fyneboatkits.co.uk/viewtopic.php?id=115&p=1

https://forum.fyneboatkits.co.uk/img/members/14/wasdale-1.jpeg

Well worth looking through, great boat.

Brian

skaraborgcraft
05-27-2013, 04:05 PM
Im wondering what was in the 99p cartridges he emptied into the bin before using the epoxy. Surely someone sells empty cartridges? I dont know what the largerst size syringe is, but for that amount of plank seam filling,thats a good tool.
The fordeck looks a little awkward, if effective for keeping of spray. Nice job, he sounds well pleased.

lagspiller
06-06-2013, 09:19 PM
The word 'færing' means "four-oaring". Its a 'contraction' of the term "fire-åring". The same happens for 6-oaring (seksring/seksæring) and 8-oaring (åttring/åttæring), and the tiæring. They were also named for the number of kjeip pairs or for the number of rooms (spaces between bulkheads/frames). Some areas called the seksæring a treroring.... a contraction of 'three-rowing'. The 'åttæring' in those areas was called a 'firoring'.
That's really all there is to the name. I guess today we would expect to see the hull shape typically produced by the nordic style of building, hull first - then frames, but technically that isn't really necessary.

peterAustralia
06-07-2013, 12:51 AM
Nice boat, but its very big

I have 'progressed' from an 18ft boat to a 13.5ft boat, mainly for rowing and i am happy for the change. When the wind comes up the larger boat is hard to row (very very hard), such a large boat at 22ft chances are that you would sail it a lot, and row only occasionally

smaller has less stress, easier to launch, build, beach, cartop etc etc

in a typical 15ft rowboat, you can generally sleep under canvas with reasonable comfort, even i have done it with a fixed thwart boat and it went quite well, less stress than having to set up camp

i will finish with 2 asides
just came back from a 6 six week holiday in southern Chile and argentina, and can report that there are some very very nice fishing boats in southern chile which with minimum conversion would make a great pot-about boat for exploring the spectacular scenery there over the summer months (winter is cold), fishing boats about 25ft long, narrow, low, timber built with diesels. Other aside, discovered ian oughtred's new design called Pike, looks very very similar to mine, but his is a bit wider, bit shorter and has a wider bottom, thus it is a hybrid sail/row boat... looks like a great design, funnily enough the lines look very very similar to what took me hours and hours to draw up, i think i should have just built his boat, but i did not know it existed. My guess is that under rowing it would be a fraction slower, but not much,.. however it has the plus of being able to be sailed if required which mine cannot

when i download my camera i will start a thread about wooden boats of southern chile