PDA

View Full Version : "Disrespect" used as a verb...



Tom Montgomery
02-21-2013, 03:36 PM
"The dude disrespected me"... I don't get it.

Why not just say, "The dude insulted me." :confused:

Can you tell I've been viewing ESPN? :d

skuthorp
02-21-2013, 03:46 PM
Combination of developing dialect, evolving grammar and a desire to be different amongst groups of mostly young men. Of course they all want to be as 'different' as everyone else in their peer and cultural generation. Happened before, will happen again.

George Jung
02-21-2013, 03:49 PM
Mostly wishing to 'be different' than the old guys.... you know, that ones that would've said 'the dude insulted me!'

Rum_Pirate
02-21-2013, 03:53 PM
"The dude disrespected me"... I don't get it.

Why not just say, "The dude insulted me." :confused:

Can you tell I've been viewing ESPN? :d


Where you at?

Tom Montgomery
02-21-2013, 03:53 PM
It is just that "the dude disrespected me" seems a wimpy expression compared to "the dude insulted me."

But maybe that is just to my ear.

Rum_Pirate
02-21-2013, 03:54 PM
*shrug* That's culture for ya.... an evolution of language, one manifestation of which is a new use for an old word. Evolve or die! :) For the uneducated and those with a minimal vocabulary.

CWSmith
02-21-2013, 03:57 PM
You guys are being too kind. It's just plain ignorant. High school dropouts in gangs talk that way. Why do some educated adults feel a need to follow (I don't mean the people here)? Tell them to pull up their pants, turn their hat the right way around, and talk like you're not a fool.

Tom Montgomery
02-21-2013, 03:58 PM
I grok the evolution of language.

Actually, "Where you at?" makes more sense to me than "the dude disrespected me." "Where you at?" can have a couple of different meanings within context of the conversation.

The former streamlines the expression. The latter simply substitutes a less forceful word for a more effective word.

IMHO, of course. ;)

Tom Montgomery
02-21-2013, 04:02 PM
On further thought... "disrespect" as a verb ("The dude disrespected me") may reflect the importance male youths from disadvantaged backgrounds place upon personal respect. The dignity of the individual and all that.... to not be judged by race, economic circumstance, and accent.

Ian McColgin
02-21-2013, 04:20 PM
"Disrespect" has been in English language use as a transitive verb since 1614.

Tom Montgomery
02-21-2013, 04:21 PM
"Disrespect" has been in English language use as a transitive verb since 1614.

Hmmm.... I have only noticed it being used regularly in the last decade or so. Maybe I simply wasn't paying attention.

Nicholas Scheuer
02-21-2013, 04:40 PM
No worse than, "I SO don't want to go there".

Your's is a Black expression; the above is mostly White.

GregH
02-21-2013, 04:51 PM
You guys are being too kind. It's just plain ignorant. High school dropouts in gangs talk that way. Why do some educated adults feel a need to follow (I don't mean the people here)? Tell them to pull up their pants, turn their hat the right way around, and talk like you're not a fool.

+++++1

"Stupid is as stupid does"

M. J. Notigan
02-21-2013, 04:54 PM
Hmmm.... I have only noticed it being used regularly in the last decade or so. Maybe I simply wasn't paying attention.

No, Tom, I'm with you on this one, except it goes back a few more then 10 years. What's worse is the shortened version......"The dude dissed me!"

Peach
02-21-2013, 05:02 PM
You boys need to get out more. Spend a bit of time hanging with your homies. You feel me?

Ian McColgin
02-21-2013, 05:05 PM
Or open a dictionary now and then.

Tom Montgomery
02-21-2013, 05:18 PM
I am going to close this thread.

Thank you for your honest responses.