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Tom Montgomery
02-19-2013, 03:12 PM
The Mississippi state legislature voted to to approve the U.S. Constitutional amendment in 1995 (!) but it was never made official due to an oversight (heh, heh, heh ;)).

The oversight has now been corrected.


http://cache.virtualtourist.com/4/3242606-Mississippi_State_Flag_under_the_American_Flag_Mis sissippi.jpg




Mississippi lawmakers have officially ratified (http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-250_162-57569880/after-148-years-mississippi-finally-ratifies-13th-amendment-which-banned-slavery/) the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, which banned slavery in 1865.

One hundred forty-eight years after three-fourths of the states voted to approve the amendment, Mississippi's legislature finally took steps to fix the glaring oversight last month. According to the Jackson Clarion-Ledger (http://www.clarionledger.com/article/20130217/NEWS01/302170050/Historic-oversight-corrected-Film-Lincoln-inspires-look-into-slavery-vote?gcheck=1&nclick_check=1), the decision was inspired by the Oscar-nominated film "Lincoln," which depicts the 16th president's efforts to enact the amendment.

After University of Mississippi Medical Center professor Dr. Ranjan Batra saw the film last year, he was inspired (http://www.clarionledger.com/article/20130217/NEWS01/302170050/Historic-oversight-corrected-Film-Lincoln-inspires-look-into-slavery-vote?gcheck=1&nclick_check=1)to look into what happened after states voted on the amendment. He found that while the state had originally rejected the slavery ban, the state legislature eventually voted to approve the amendment in 1995. The measure cleared both legislative chambers, but was never sent to the Office of the Federal Register and therefore never made official.

Batra then contacted another Mississippi resident, Ken Sullivan, who in turn got in touch with Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann. Hosemann's office agreed to fix the oversight and file the paperwork, making the ratification official on February 7.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/18/mississippi-13th-amendment_n_2712289.html

Paul Pless
02-19-2013, 03:14 PM
now about that flag. . .

John of Phoenix
02-19-2013, 03:23 PM
now about that flag. . .Never gonna happen. Mississippi ain't Georgia.

JTA
02-19-2013, 03:51 PM
I am proud to be from Mississippi, I am not proud of that flag.

Jack

Arizona Bay
02-19-2013, 03:54 PM
I wonder why they chose the national flag of Yugoslavia, as the background for the Confederate battle flag?

http://travels.bowenplace.com/europe_2008/flags/files/flag_kgdm_yugoslavia.jpg


Somebody better inform the Govnah .... it may be a commie plot ;)

CWSmith
02-19-2013, 03:55 PM
So, has any state not ratified it that was in the union at the time?

Paul Pless
02-19-2013, 04:00 PM
I am proud to be from Mississippi, I am not proud of that flag.

JackI'm proud to be from the South as well. It was only ten years ago that Alabama stopped flying the Battle Flag of the Confederacy from its Capitol, on the same pole as the United States Flag, and the Alabama State Flag. At the same time they removed all such imagery from anything to do with the state. Stuff like this was particularly disturbing.

http://www.jessejoyce.com/v2/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/alabama_state_trooper_confederate_flag_police_patc h.jpg

At the time I did feel that removing the Heart of Dixie logo from the license plate was maybe too far. But its since been replaced with Sweet Home Alabama, and I'm good with that.

http://www.deerrunmercantile.com/images/products/detail/alTruckVarious2001.jpg

Arizona Bay
02-19-2013, 04:10 PM
I'm proud to be from the South as well. It was only ten years ago that Alabama stopped flying the Battle Flag of the Confederacy from its Capitol, on the same pole as the United States Flag, and the Alabama State Flag. At the same time they removed all such imagery from anything to do with the state. Stuff like this was particularly disturbing.

http://www.jessejoyce.com/v2/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/alabama_state_trooper_confederate_flag_police_patc h.jpg



Why the cross of St. Patrick?

JTA
02-19-2013, 04:15 PM
I think the Alabama decision was driven by some of the auto manufacturing they were trying to bring to the state. It was a good move.
People argue the the rebel flag represents their culture or history or ancestors that were lost. The pain and suffering it represents far out-way any of that for me.

Jack

Paul Pless
02-19-2013, 04:19 PM
Why the cross of St. Patrick?What makes you think its not based on the flag of Scotland?;)


The flag of the State of Alabama shall be a crimson cross of St. Andrew on a field of white. The bars forming the cross shall be not less than six inches broad, and must extend diagonally across the flag from side to side." - (Code 1896, 3751; Code 1907, 2058; Code 1923, 2995; Code 1940, T. 55, 5.)

Paul Pless
02-19-2013, 04:20 PM
People argue the the rebel flag represents their culture or history or ancestors that were lost. The pain and suffering it represents far out-way any of that for me.

JackI agree completely Jack. I'm still divided on the Heart of Dixie slogan. Dixie is place to me, not a time.

Arizona Bay
02-19-2013, 04:52 PM
Hmmm something aint right :D

Cross of St Andrew:
http://media-1.web.britannica.com/eb-media/40/3940-004-54CB180A.jpg

flag of a constituent unit of the United Kingdom (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/615557/United-Kingdom), flown subordinate to the Union Jack (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/614768/United-Kingdom-flag-of-the), that consists of a blue field (background) bearing a white saltire (diagonal cross) that extends to the flag corners; this type of emblem is known as the Cross of St. Andrew (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/23960/Saint-Andrew) (after the patron saint of Scotland).

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/1355495/Scotland-flag-of



Neither one is from Yugoslavia ;)

fishrswim
02-19-2013, 06:37 PM
Whatever. One saint seems as good as another for a flag. As long as the boys in the pointy hats say it's OK, then it's OK with me.

Keith Wilson
02-19-2013, 06:48 PM
it's just a flag that has come to symbolize the suffering of the South... something some people won't want to be reminded of I supposeIt has indeed; lots and lots of suffering. That's why so many people think displaying it is a very bad idea.

http://ps119amersfort.com/yes_we_can/images/slavery.jpg


A Declaration of the Immediate Causes which Induce and Justify the Secession of the State of Mississippi from the Federal Union

In the momentous step, which our State has taken of dissolving its connection with the government of which we so long formed a part, it is but just that we should declare the prominent reasons which have induced our course.

Our position is thoroughly identified with the institution of slavery - the greatest material interest of the world. Its labor supplies the product, which constitutes by far the largest and most important portions of commerce of the earth. These products are peculiar to the climate verging on the tropical regions, and by an imperious law of nature, none but the black race can bear exposure to the tropical sun. These products have become necessities of the world, and a blow at slavery is a blow at commerce and civilization. That blow has been long aimed at the institution, and was at the point of reaching its consummation. There was no choice left us but submission to the mandates of abolition, or a dissolution of the Union, whose principles had been subverted to work out our ruin.

That we do not overstate the dangers to our institution, a reference to a few facts will sufficiently prove.

The hostility to this institution commenced before the adoption of the Constitution, and was manifested in the well-known Ordinance of 1787, in regard to the Northwestern Territory.
The feeling increased, until, in 1819-20, it deprived the South of more than half the vast territory acquired from France.
The same hostility dismembered Texas and seized upon all the territory acquired from Mexico.

It has grown until it denies the right of property in slaves, and refuses protection to that right on the high seas, in the Territories, and wherever the government of the United States had jurisdiction.
It refuses the admission of new slave States into the Union, and seeks to extinguish it by confining it within its present limits, denying the power of expansion.
It tramples the original equality of the South under foot.
It has nullified the Fugitive Slave Law in almost every free State in the Union, and has utterly broken the compact, which our fathers pledged their faith to maintain.
It advocates negro equality, socially and politically, and promotes insurrection and incendiarism in our midst.
It has enlisted its press, its pulpit and its schools against us, until the whole popular mind of the North is excited and inflamed with prejudice.
It has made combinations and formed associations to carry out its schemes of emancipation in the States and wherever else slavery exists.
It seeks not to elevate or to support the slave, but to destroy his present condition without providing a better.
It has invaded a State, and invested with the honors of martyrdom the wretch whose purpose was to apply flames to our dwellings, and the weapons of destruction to our lives.
It has broken every compact into which it has entered for our security.
It has given indubitable evidence of its design to ruin our agriculture, to prostrate our industrial pursuits and to destroy our social system.
It knows no relenting or hesitation in its purposes; it stops not in its march of aggression, and leaves us no room to hope for cessation or for pause.
It has recently obtained control of the Government, by the prosecution of its unhallowed schemes, and destroyed the last expectation of living together in friendship and brotherhood.

Utter subjugation awaits us in the Union, if we should consent longer to remain in it. It is not a matter of choice, but of necessity. We must either submit to degradation, and to the loss of property worth four billions of money, or we must secede from the Union framed by our fathers, to secure this as well as every other species of property. For far less cause than this, our fathers separated from the Crown of England.

Our decision is made. We follow their footsteps. We embrace the alternative of separation; and for the reasons here stated, we resolve to maintain our rights with the full consciousness of the justice of our course, and the undoubting belief of our ability to maintain it.

ahp
02-19-2013, 06:51 PM
Why is anyone proud to be from anywhere? Did you have something to do with making that place? Or are you proud of your accomplishments, perhaps quite deservedly, in spite of where you came from? Or are you proud to have had the good sense to make the exit from it?

Just asking.

Peter Malcolm Jardine
02-19-2013, 07:26 PM
Another magnificent message from the defender of freedom and liberty around the world

S/V Laura Ellen
02-19-2013, 07:36 PM
I don't know, this all seems kind of hasty, maybe they should of just slept on it for a few more decades.
Sometimes good legislation takes time.

David G
02-19-2013, 09:40 PM
Mississippi is determined to cement its reputation as an avatar of moral rectitude.

fishrswim
02-20-2013, 12:17 AM
Why is anyone proud to be from anywhere? Did you have something to do with making that place? Or are you proud of your accomplishments, perhaps quite deservedly, in spite of where you came from? Or are you proud to have had the good sense to make the exit from it?

Just asking.

I am proud that I got out of Texas as soon as I could.