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moTthediesel
02-01-2013, 08:18 AM
Craig's list again! 1951 Walker Turner TA 1182 10" table saw, mine for $200. In it's present condition, not a steal, but a basically sound machine.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-E-CxxkEpX5Y/UQu3OcrTGnI/AAAAAAAABE8/SvRKb-SW4OE/s720/IMG_2143.JPG

With it's original Driver 1hp motor, it's running right now, but I plan to clean it up a bit before I use it. The top is rusty, but it is light surface rust only. It has the fence, but the miter gauge is missing |:(, but it takes a standard 3/8"X3/4" bar, so that will be easily replaced. The wiring and switch are a nightmare, but that too can be addressed.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-JQCAsjXic1M/UQu3nunl1zI/AAAAAAAABFU/yyOpGk6s-OU/s720/IMG_2145.JPG

I love old machines, they tell you a tale of the years of their work -- here's evidence of an "oh sh-t!" moment, and a good reason why table saw should not ever stand in for some saw horses.. How the sparks must have flown!

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-u4ldvn34-oY/UQu3vfqiT0I/AAAAAAAABFg/Hdqq2A77HIA/s720/IMG_2146.JPG

I plan to shift the extensions around so the wide one is on the left, as I prefer to rip on that side, and I'll make up a cross cut sled too, and it will be ready to go. If anybody has a proper miter, and/or a proper 50's era motor switch I'd like to hear from you...

Tom

Kudzu
02-01-2013, 08:26 AM
I have a shop full of restored old machines that I use. Never had a WT but they get good reviews. You can get some deals on old rust saws when cleaning a top is no big deal. Of course most people want theirs to shine like it it was new and thing that it is ruined because it has rust. :-)

My last project was a 12" jointer that was found in the woods, abandon at a saw mill. Talk about rust.

SMARTINSEN
02-01-2013, 08:29 AM
BE CAREFUL ! ! !
(damhikt)

Some of the older motors spin at 1725 rpm, you may wish consider a more modern one that goes at 3450. IMHO, the sacrifice of authenticity is a small price to get a a better saw if you are planning to use it more than occasionally, especially for ripping.

moTthediesel
02-01-2013, 09:37 AM
No, this has a 3450 motor with a triple matched belt drive to the arbor. By the 50's the major machine companies pretty much had table saws figured out, and this saw is not much different than a Unisaw of the same vintage. That is to say, not much changed from one you could buy new today, for 10X$ of course.

Tom

SMARTINSEN
02-01-2013, 10:16 AM
I like the cast wings. Hopefully that saw kerf (!) is not a weak spot.

moTthediesel
02-01-2013, 10:29 AM
I like the cast wings. Hopefully that saw kerf (!) is not a weak spot.

I'm sure it is somewhat weakened there, but when I switch the extensions around that will be bolted right up against the main table, which should help support it. It is heavy, close to 300# I'd guess, it was grunt-worthy for two of us to get it up into the truck I can tell you!

Mrleft8
02-01-2013, 10:49 AM
I'm not sure about the wisdom of switching the table extensions.... Just from a balance point.... I think the weight of the larger table on the left hand side might cause stability issues.... You could fill that saw oops! in with JB weld or epoxy.

moTthediesel
02-01-2013, 11:26 AM
I'm not sure about the wisdom of switching the table extensions.... Just from a balance point.... I think the weight of the larger table on the left hand side might cause stability issues.... You could fill that saw oops! in with JB weld or epoxy.

Yes, but I (for whatever reason?) learned to rip with the fence on the left, and that is how I like to do it. Besides, the motor (not mounted now) sticks out the right side of the cabinet, if anything, putting the wide wing on the left should tend to balance the saw.

Paul Pless
02-01-2013, 12:03 PM
the single best thing i ever did with my cabinet saw was to bolt it to the floor. . .

Rob Hazard
02-01-2013, 02:53 PM
I worked with one of those for 20 years. It was a beautifully smooth and accurate saw. The only problem with it is that you can't make a zero-clearance table insert for it. But we lived with it, and the Unisaw that replaced it is often referred to as "the Walker-Turner" and everyone knows which saw we mean.

Canoeyawl
02-01-2013, 03:21 PM
the single best thing i ever did with my cabinet saw was to bolt it to the floor. . .
And the single best thing I did with mine was fit it with wheels...

Paul Pless
02-01-2013, 03:47 PM
LOL iii

moTthediesel
02-01-2013, 04:29 PM
I worked with one of those for 20 years. It was a beautifully smooth and accurate saw. The only problem with it is that you can't make a zero-clearance table insert for it. But we lived with it, and the Unisaw that replaced it is often referred to as "the Walker-Turner" and everyone knows which saw we mean.

Yeah, that table insert is one odd thing, what were they thinking when they designed that?

Boatman53
02-01-2013, 06:06 PM
I've got one of those and love it, much quieter than the unisaw that replaced it. The WT is now in a little used shop, just in case. The throat insert was the main reason I had my eye out for a unisaw.
Jim

the_gr8t_waldo
02-01-2013, 08:42 PM
i'd love to find one like that. stand by...the price of good fences are a real eye opener!

Paul Pless
02-01-2013, 09:08 PM
i'd love to find one like that. stand by...the price of good fences are a real eye opener!

there's some really well thought out homebuilt fences out there, including Beisemeyer clones. . .

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/attachments/f12/19547d1294003845t-home-made-table-saw-fence-ideas-tablesawfencepg1.jpg

http://lh5.ggpht.com/_xRfKa4WumFg/TI42sooQfSI/AAAAAAAAATw/FWm1iL0Wl1g/s320/Homemade_Biesemeyer_Style_T-Square_Table_saw_fence.jpg

David G
02-01-2013, 09:32 PM
Shop-built fences can be perfectly fine - if one is able to value one's labor at Zero. Otherwise... you're better off to buy the Biesemeyer or Paralok or...

But if your rails are sufficiently unique - you might be stuck building your own fence.

moTthediesel
04-17-2013, 08:19 AM
Just to update this, I've finished cleaning up that saw...

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-ukobG-LztoQ/UW4CcYXzleI/AAAAAAAABRU/tZU7o8jD6mU/s720/IMG_0202.JPG

I've only done a few test cuts, but so far I'm right pleased, it's very quiet and smooth -- passed the nickle test first try! Still need to build a cross-cut sled and find a proper miter gauge for it, but it's getting there.

If you're interested, here's a thread on the project I put up on the Old Woodworking Machines forum:http://www.owwm.org/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=129601 That site is a great resource for anyone interested in these great old tools. I recommend it highly -- nice folks there.

Next -- time to build a big bow shed shop to put it in... then start making some cedar sawdust!

Tom

David G
04-17-2013, 10:27 AM
You call THAT cleaned up?? That machine has got sawdust all over it! ;)

seedy
04-17-2013, 10:43 PM
Looks really good! Did you fill in the boo-boo?

moTthediesel
04-18-2013, 07:40 AM
Looks really good! Did you fill in the boo-boo?

No, I didn't, but with the tables switched right for left, the cut area is now bolted tight up against the main table.

Frost
04-18-2013, 08:00 PM
Yes, but I (for whatever reason?) learned to rip with the fence on the left, and that is how I like to do it. Besides, the motor (not mounted now) sticks out the right side of the cabinet, if anything, putting the wide wing on the left should tend to balance the saw.
Wow........... I'm really curious. How did it come to be that you learned to use a tablesaw with the blade to the right of the fence. Did you grow up in a family of lefties? Are you a lefty? It obviously is working for you and that's whats important. I'd guess your new(old) wt tilts to the right, which would make it perfect for someone like you. I've worked in woodshops for a lot of years now and never seen anyone work daily with the fence to the left of the blade, occasionally yes, but not as a matter of course. Dare to be different!!

moTthediesel
04-18-2013, 08:26 PM
When I was a kid, my Dad had a shop with a tablesaw, and he used it all the time. He was very respectful of the saw, and I was not, under any circumstance, allowed to use it. So I first used a tablesaw when I worked in a State Park sign shop almost 40 years ago.

The head sign maker was a lefty, and he had the shop Unisaw set up that way, wide wing left. After my training ("do you know how to use a tablesaw? "Sure!" "OK, get started" -end of training) I started cutting out sign blanks from 1/2" MDO. I did that every day for the best part of a year, ripping with the fence on the left. Since then, it just feels odd to do it any other way.

Tom