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Brooksinct
01-29-2013, 01:21 PM
I hear that green wood is better than dried because it will bend better. But then how does it react to drying while fastened? Do people paint the end grain to reduce checking? Wouldnt it have a tendancy to crack at the fasteners? I am working with atlantic white cedar and it is in my basement. Any help would be great.

Mrleft8
01-29-2013, 02:03 PM
AWC dries very quickly. Unless it was milled a month ago, it's probably done most of it's significant shrinking already. But yes...... Painting the ends will help minimize end checking. If you drive a nail through green wood, the fibers will make way for the nail and then shrink around it making it even tighter. Screws with pilot holes should be treated like end grain (A dot of paint, or varnish before driving the screw will help).

Brooksinct
01-29-2013, 02:17 PM
it was literally milled a month ago...

Mrleft8
01-29-2013, 05:10 PM
Wait until March then... ;)
You should definitely have painted or sealed the end grain when it was fresh off the mill, but it's not too late. On the plus side, AWC doesn't check as badly as hardwoods like Oak or Locust, so you'll probably be OK...... Why did you move it straight from the mill to your basement? It would be best to let it air dry under cover (shed roof or at least some plywood or tin roofing over the stack) outside for several months before moving it into a dry winter heated environment.......

Peerie Maa
01-29-2013, 05:20 PM
I hear that green wood is better than dried because it will bend better. But then how does it react to drying while fastened? Do people paint the end grain to reduce checking? Wouldnt it have a tendancy to crack at the fasteners? I am working with atlantic white cedar and it is in my basement. Any help would be great.

What sort of bending? Steam or springing it round the moulds. If steaming don't let it dry. If springing it round the moulds season it properly, or it might shrink, warp and split at the fastenings as it dries.

Brooksinct
01-30-2013, 09:18 AM
So why is there a difference if steaming. What is to prevent it from checking/ cracking when steam bent? I am not steaming but it is going to be taking some serious curves.

Mrleft8
01-30-2013, 10:28 AM
In theory it dries slowly, releasing tension slowly...... The cells relax and slip past eachother slowly until they have reached EMC. When you dry lumber too quickly (inside a dry basement in winter) the tension is released quickly and the cells slip past each other quickly and rupture. When you steam lumber you're warming the lignin cells which relaxes them and allows them to slip past each other more easily quickly but because they've been previously relaxed and moved, they don't tend to rupture...... I'm sure someone can elucidate this better than I have......

CundysHarbor
01-30-2013, 10:34 AM
My guess is that it is dry now. You'll be fine.
Dave