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Buddy Sharpton
01-10-2003, 03:27 PM
Finally found enough time since pulling this Joel White 15' MarshCat three and a half years ago to finish her. Re-faires, re-rigged, re-finished,re-designed foils, re-powered, and downright re-fined interior. Once you get into it, well... got to do it right, right?

I buttoned her up and hauled her to the club the week before Christmas, but had too many travel /family plans and bad weather conflicting to launch, but yesterday, a 62 degree day and just at whitecapping gift from the gods came my way and I took her out for a shakedown.
Glad to report she's as dry as can be, everything held together, and she balances beautifully. What a joy http://www.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat 1.jpg
!) In the water. You can see the longer bowsprit with the roller furling jib, the barn door rudder,
the removable hatch creating a bigger cuddy, and the removable Sport Seats in the cockpit.
http://www.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat 2.jpg
2) Same shot, but you can see the whole rig.
www.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat 3.jpg
3. You can see the a al Bolger rudder plate, the trolling motor built into the skeg through a tube. Joel White's dad E. B. wrote "The trumpet of the Swan"- that's Louis as the mascot in our "pub sign"name board. http://wwww.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat 3.jpg http://www.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat 4.jpg
These seats set in colapsible mahogany "frames" so you can clear it off into the cuddy and put sleeping bags on nice flat wide floorboards. Flotation under the seats too, along with flotation bags in the forepeak just in case. www.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat 5jpg
5. The fforepeak can be closed in with these latch in ppartial bulkheads and cuddy doors. The doors hold down those mahogany battery covers and the battery ballast for the inboard power. Have a 2 horse Honda and bracket, along with lifejackets, buckets and cooler all out of sight. Electrical panel there as well for two battery system for house lights and bilge pump, radios . The two reefing lines and roller furling lead back here in easy reach. Doors keep oars and paddle locked away as well. www.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat 6.jpg
6. The hinged mast that lets all the sails ,boom, and standing rigging say in place. Lift mast to vertical, the fiberglass sleeve sides over the joint to corral mast on mast stub "step". The mast hoops can slide over the whole deal. Forestay clips on with a Johnson lever. http://www.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat 7.jpg
Back to the dock having gotten the goody out of the day.

Buddy Sharpton
01-10-2003, 03:44 PM
Guys, posting pictures seems over my head, this won't link to my online site. I supposed if you want to see them, you could go to http://www.icommservices.com/adv to do the link yourself.

John Bell
01-10-2003, 03:51 PM
Originally posted by Buddy Sharpton:
Finally found enough time since pulling this Joel White 15' MarshCat three and a half years ago to finish her. Re-faires, re-rigged, re-finished,re-designed foils, re-powered, and downright re-fined interior. Once you get into it, well... got to do it right, right?

I buttoned her up and hauled her to the club the week before Christmas, but had too many travel /family plans and bad weather conflicting to launch, but yesterday, a 62 degree day and just at whitecapping gift from the gods came my way and I took her out for a shakedown.
Glad to report she's as dry as can be, everything held together, and she balances beautifully. What a joy http://www.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat%201.jpg
!) In the water. You can see the longer bowsprit with the roller furling jib, the barn door rudder,
the removable hatch creating a bigger cuddy, and the removable Sport Seats in the cockpit.
http://www.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat%202.jpg
2) Same shot, but you can see the whole rig.
http://www.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat%203.jpg
3. You can see the a al Bolger rudder plate, the trolling motor built into the skeg through a tube. Joel White's dad E. B. wrote "The trumpet of the Swan"- that's Louis as the mascot in our "pub sign"name board. http://wwww.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat%203jpg http://www.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat%204.jpg
These seats set in colapsible mahogany "frames" so you can clear it off into the cuddy and put sleeping bags on nice flat wide floorboards. Flotation under the seats too, along with flotation bags in the forepeak just in case. http://www.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat%205.jpg
5. The fforepeak can be closed in with these latch in ppartial bulkheads and cuddy doors. The doors hold down those mahogany battery covers and the battery ballast for the inboard power. Have a 2 horse Honda and bracket, along with lifejackets, buckets and cooler all out of sight. Electrical panel there as well for two battery system for house lights and bilge pump, radios . The two reefing lines and roller furling lead back here in easy reach. Doors keep oars and paddle locked away as well. http://www.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat%206.jpg
6. The hinged mast that lets all the sails ,boom, and standing rigging say in place. Lift mast to vertical, the fiberglass sleeve sides over the joint to corral mast on mast stub "step". The mast hoops can slide over the whole deal. Forestay clips on with a Johnson lever. http://www.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat%207.jpg
Back to the dock having gotten the goody out of the day.URLs don't like spaces. I just put a "%20" in where you had spaces in the filenames.

Were those pictures taken at AYC on Allatoona?

[ 01-10-2003, 03:58 PM: Message edited by: John Bell ]

NormMessinger
01-10-2003, 03:53 PM
http://www.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat%207.jpg
http://www.icommservices.com/adv/MarshCat%207.jpg

For some reason the %207 is required.

NormMessinger
01-10-2003, 03:55 PM
Scot, ya need to set your server clock It is only 3:46 EST

ion barnes
01-11-2003, 02:34 AM
Everyone is consentrating on getting the picx up anot a mention about how prim an pretty it looks! Thats a lot of work Buddy,and I bet you wont soon forget it either. You deserve a best of show, hands down.

Paul Scheuer
01-11-2003, 09:26 AM
Good work. Nice pictures. I'll bet she's a beauty in motion. I kept scrolling down for a pic of her under sail.

Art Read
01-11-2003, 01:11 PM
"...Everyone is consentrating on getting the picx up anot a mention about how prim an pretty it looks! Thats a lot of work Buddy,and I bet you wont soon forget it either. You deserve a best of show, hands down...."
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What he said! :cool:

Stu Fyfe
01-11-2003, 01:19 PM
You have the same type of fins on the rudder that I have on my 22ft Bolger. Were they included in Joel White's original plans or did you add them to balance the helm due to the jib?

Buddy Sharpton
01-13-2003, 04:30 PM
Thanks guys for the kind words.
John- pictures were taken at Lake Lanier Sailing Club.
Paul- I was by myself on a Thursday; next warm day I'll try to bring company or give a camera to another boat and get some under sail pictures.
Stu- the rudder is my own design because I love the look of a traditional ellipitically shaped barndoor rudder on catboats. As drawn in the plans, the rudder resembles the Pooduck's kickup affair and other MarshCat owners had said the original design seemed too small. I went to the full rectangular shape underwater for maximum area, and the Bolger style endplate to make up for the lost efficiency of such a low aspect ratio shape. Seems to work fine. I like the way a barndoor rudder can scull you through a balky tack or ease you up a bit to reach an upwind dock.
The jib was another idea, borrowed from Sam Crocker on a refit of his 1945 16' Dogwatch. It's to reduce weather helm on broad reaches, even if you have to snatch in a reef to keep total area manageable. It will move the center of effort forward to counteract lee helm. In all of 3 hours sailing time, I find I can carry it to weather and still adjust trim for a slight weather helm, but it's much too soon to be sure it makes me point higher or go faster. I'll pay attention to the compass, speedo, and GPS and experiment next time. I'll let you know how well what works best where when I figure it out I was having way too much funjust sailing her after 3 1/2 years out of the boat to spend 3 1/2 hours on a lab project. I've still got to sort out mast rake, sheet leads and shroud tension et al too. But I must have gotten it mostly right on judgement if not actual observation.
Hope I can get another crack at it this week.

John Bell
01-13-2003, 04:49 PM
I should have guessed that it was Lanier, Buddy. I had forgotten they finally pulled Allatoona down to it's winter pool (17' below summer) in the last two weeks.

Getting pictures of your own boat while underway is always hard. The other day we were out on Allatoona when we saw off in the distance a little white lugsail. Immediately I knew whoever it was was my kind of people, so we altered course and motored over to see what it was. It turned out to be a lovely little Shellback dinghy out for it's maiden voyage. I took a few photos for the proud skipper which I'll send to him as soon as I get that roll processed.

Turns out the guy had started the boat at WB school course last summer. He took the fall to finish it to a high standard (similar to Buddy's boat!) and was finally launching it. The thing that most surprised him was when I greeted him with "Hey, nice Shellback!"

Lion
01-14-2003, 10:36 PM
Buddy

Just too pretty for words. To my eye there is just somthing about a well designed and built catboat that is greater than the sum of its parts. Evolved funtional beauty?

Interested to hear how you find the jib contributes to overall handling as you get more use. Love the sports seats; thats going to weather in comfort !

Inspiring !

Lion

capt jake
01-14-2003, 11:05 PM
I must have very, very bad. Santa didn't bring anything near that for me!

Very nice!! I have not read all of the posts, but drooled over the pictures!!! (pardon me, would you mind cleaning them up for me?)

You must thank Santa!! Very nice.... very nice.. smile.gif smile.gif

Buddy Sharpton
02-17-2003, 06:59 PM
Garland Reese, here are the Marsh Cat pictures again.

Chadd Hamilton
02-18-2003, 09:43 AM
Great looking boat, Buddy. You've done a fabulous job on her. Happy sailing.

John of Phoenix
02-18-2003, 10:55 AM
Beautiful work Buddy. Tell us about that clever mast tabernacle. What did you used for the hinge and how is the tube made?

Trumpeter swan. :D

Buddy Sharpton
02-18-2003, 11:26 AM
John, the hinged mast works well on my Marsh Cat. I started out with as designed solid mast setup in hand, going thru a round deck hole and fitting into a mast step some 24" below. It was just too much effort setting up to be practical for me. This catboat is designed with side stays. My solution here would NOT work on an unstayed or headstay only catboat
The idea here is to visualize that you are creating a cabin top mount for a deck stepped stayed mast some 20" above the deck, but don't have any cabin top. I cut the mast 20" above the deck, bulit a square collar for it incorporating turning blocks for the reefing and furling gear to lead aft. The mast stub goes 24" below deck to the step. The collar is bedded and thru bolted to the deck, the mast heel also bolted. The idea is the the top of that mast stub is a solid, sufficiently rigid, immovable mast step.
Before I cut the mast , which has a gradual taper, I wrapped the 16" area where I neeped to create a tube ( plus 2" margins each side) with one layer of shirt cardboard and then poly plastic. I spiral wrapped layers of 4" fiberglass tape and epoxy. alternating clockwise and counter clockwise, until I had 3/16" thickness. I slid off the tube, sanded smooth, squared ends and painted buff. Then I cut the mast 8" above boom. The tube's sole function is to lock the upper mast on the mast step. It does not provide a high friction, machined fit like a two piece tent pole ferrule. It is sufficiently compact and small enough in diameter to allow the traditional mast hoops to slide over the joint easily, and looks about invisable. I had built, and discarded, a boxy, square regular mast tabernacle with pivot bolt and locking bolt that was jsut plain beast ugly up there

I cut a notch in the aft face for two3/4 x 6" stock bronze strap hinged laid side by side with twelvw #12 x 2" screws. These are buried flush with the mast so the tube will slide over them. Opposite the hinge side, on the faces of the mating parts, I have created 3/4 " diameter holes filled with epoxy mush, one face holding 3/8" bronze pins set 3/4" proud, on the other face matching drilled holes or sockets a scoosch wide with a beveled edge. These assist the hinge in preventing any rotation of the mast out of alignment with the stub.
The tube is sufficient strongh and tight to hold the mast aloft by itself while the headstay is being attached while the trailer is on level ground. In practice I use a line forward as a safety.

John of Phoenix
02-18-2003, 12:40 PM
That's a nifty trick making the tube. I used a similar technique for a daggerboard trunk.

The hinge is well thought out too. There's probably not much twist imparted to the mast given that the sail swings on the hoops and the gaff rotates freely and the forestay keeps things straight too. How many pins did you use and how far in from the forward edge are they installed? (You can tell I'm going to use this design, can't you?)

Buddy Sharpton
02-18-2003, 02:21 PM
John, my mast is 3 3/4" in diameter at the deck and then tapers in a standard curve to 2 1/4" at the shoulder for the eyes of the stays. As it keeps tapering upward, that gave me the opportunity to select the 16" portion of a 20" tube blank I wanted to use for a snug fit. My mast is hand rounded and not perfect, but I could see how it could be machined to more nearly be so. That would help with an overall snug fit. In my case, the tube will fall all but the last 1 1/2 of the 8" on either side of the joint position by the force of gravity. I simply push it down the rest of the way till it hits the gooseneck and then rotate the tube till I get a binding fit on a high spot of the mast. That way, the hoops, if they catch slightly on the well rounded edge of the tube, can't lift the tube when I hoist sail. I suppose some kind of catch at the bottom could be fashioned, but the friction fit is plenty. What the thing did do was creak under the motion of the boat, the shiny inner surface of the glass tube against the gloss varnished spar. I wet sanded the spar to dead flat in the area under the tube and that stopped that.
My mast is about 3 1/2" in diameter at the joint. The two ABI hinges placed side by side make a 1 1/2' flat at what we'll call six o'clock on the joint. A little of the spar has to be removed at 45 degrees above and beloww the hinge pin so the mast can fold a little beyond 90 degrees. All of the hinge must be buried in from the circular cross section. The pins are two 3/8 bronze rods, one at 2 o'clock and one at 10 o'clock, about 1/2" in from the edge. I found the soft spruce was too easily mashed letting the pin go askew when the slop in the mast hinge let the pin miss the hole coming down and wallow out its own new hole. That's why I drilled out the four 3/4 holes, set the pins in epoxy mush centered in two, filled the two "socket" holes with mush, let it go green, then partially closed the joint to get an impression to see where to drill the 1/64th oversize socket holes. I used a round over bit in my router to round over the socket edges so they would be self guiding, aligning the descending pins into snug fitting, durable sockets. The pins are buried about an inch, with 3/4" standing proud. This has worked very well. I have yet to putthe rig through a double reefed destruction derby, but I really believe it is up to snuff. My mast is 15 1/2' tall above this joint, supporting 152 sq ft main and 48 sq ft jib. My boat weighs 1375 pounds to DWL. Strong enough for that kind of load. Once again, this design works only for a stayed mast, and that mast stub must be essentially rigid . This makes the mast in theory pin ended at both ends, and in pure compression, for purposes of calculating sufficient strength and stiffness to carry the load. The boom attached in this manner puts all its side load forces on the,again in theory, unmovable( for our purposes here) mast stub. And with a 12" gooseneck height above deck on a 33/4" diameter spar with a 24" lever arm below, the stub isn't going to move horizontally to any perceptible degree.
What are you building?

John of Phoenix
02-18-2003, 03:20 PM
Thanks for the details Buddy. I'm JUST getting started on a Stevenson's Weekender. The mast is of a similar size and situated much as you've done yours - shrouds and a forestay, stub mast to the keel with the tabernacle just above the cabin. The plans call for large galvanized gate hinges fore and aft on the mast with a removable pin on the forward hinge. Definitely a case of function before style but very strong.

Here's a variation similar to yours on one builder's boat.

http://www.pragdata.com/philboat/boat0232.jpg

[The beauty of your design is the tube. It solves the problem many builders have with the hoops catching on the hinge when raising/lowering the sail. Very well done all around. LOVE the brightwork.]

[ 02-18-2003, 03:28 PM: Message edited by: John Teetsel ]

Buddy Sharpton
02-18-2003, 03:37 PM
John, I have "book learning" familiarity with the Weekender, but I've never sailed one. I think a mast hinge like mine would be very suitable for the loads involved.

John of Phoenix
02-18-2003, 03:58 PM
It's a bit longer, 19 1/2' overall, 16' LOD, but weighs only about 550 lbs (no ballast) and carries a total of 120 sq feet of sail. I let you know how she sails. :D