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pefjr
12-31-2012, 02:16 PM
It's tradition.

3 cups of water with a lb. of Black Eyed peas .... soak tonight.... cook in the morning according to directions( even a chimpanzee can cook this easy recipe Osborne)
A bay leaf and two ham hocks
A lot of Tabasco sauce ...* on the side. Salt and Pepper

I recommend some fried lace cornbread, sliced sweet onion, sliced cucumbers, sliced tomatoes, sliced green peppers etc. to sweeten the deal.

Brings Good Luck in the New Year.

Peerie Maa
12-31-2012, 02:21 PM
Any thing with ham hocks has got to be right, but I have no idea what you are talking about. :D

Bobby of Tulsa
12-31-2012, 02:26 PM
The black eyed peas and ham hock are on the stove as we speak. Corn bread and onions and some super hot jalapeņos. I may not feel like cookin tomorrow.:)

Paul Pless
12-31-2012, 02:52 PM
I'm doing collards and skillet cornbread in addition to blackeyed peas. . .

Horace
12-31-2012, 02:59 PM
Any thing with ham hocks has got to be right, but I have no idea what you are talking about. :DHoppin' John.

My own recipe is bacon and onions fried together, add a can of black-eyed peas, cook a little more, and serve over rice. Anything more is painting the lily.

pefjr
12-31-2012, 03:22 PM
Any thing with ham hocks has got to be right, but I have no idea what you are talking about. :DFINALLY! I have stumped PM!!!:d:D Don't believe it, surely........ It dates back in history as far as writing. There are all kinds of tales and you can make up some of you own. It's a slave food, soul food, southern food, Jewish food, even Greek food. One story is that during the Civil War( I bet John W knows this one)some Yankees on the battlefield were starving, so that night they quietly raided the Confederates food supply, taking everything except some scrap pork and the BE peas. The Confederates survived the winter on the remaining salt pork and peas. Cook some and make up a story.

Lace cornbread

1 cup of corn meal
1/2 tsp. salt
4 T flour
2 T vege oil
1/2 cup of water

Mix all ingredients until blended and cook like pancakes in a hot iron skillet. Tip: Might add more water to make the batter thin, bread will cook with Lace pattern.

Paul Pless
12-31-2012, 03:28 PM
Jewish food???

John of Phoenix
12-31-2012, 03:35 PM
Jewish food,
???

What? You don't believe him? :D

pefjr
12-31-2012, 03:43 PM
???Yes... you have a question, don't be shy.

John of Phoenix
12-31-2012, 04:18 PM
You may have heard that Jews aren't supposed to eat pork. Given that restriction, it would seem a contradiction to call something made with "two ham hocks" "Jewish food" but you have a different opinion.

pefjr
12-31-2012, 04:35 PM
You may have heard that Jews aren't supposed to eat pork. Given that restriction, it would seem a contradiction to call something made with "two ham hocks" "Jewish food" but you have a different opinion.Yep, I heard that. There are many different seasonings for Black Eyed peas. Plus you haven't heard my story of Ezkiel and Black Eyed peas.

Lew Barrett
12-31-2012, 04:45 PM
Yep, I heard that. There are many different seasonings for Black Eyed peas. Plus you haven't heard my story of Ezkiel and Black Eyed peas.

Jew boy here. You rang? Never heard of BEPs and ham hocks bringing good luck for the New Year. Anyway (technically) the Yids had New Year a few months ago. Here's the deal............

Adult Content (sort of) (http://www.southparkstudios.com/clips/103722/a-jew-on-christmas#tab=featured)

pefjr
12-31-2012, 05:35 PM
Jew boy here. You rang? Never heard of BEPs and ham hocks bringing good luck for the New Year. Anyway (technically) the Yids had New Year a few months ago. Here's the deal............

Adult Content (sort of) (http://www.southparkstudios.com/clips/103722/a-jew-on-christmas#tab=featured) Well you need to get with the program Lew, http://www.jdate.com/jmag/2010/09/black-eyed-peas-for-rosh-hashanah/ This is like saying Catholic women don't use birth control pills. Black eyed peas go back a long time and the sprouts have been used in bread for thousands of years. My family has a reunion every July 4th for 40 + years in SE Alabama. About 15% are Jews and they all happy dig into the BEP's and Ham Hock. Ham Hock is a southern seasoning, and chicken will season the peas just as good if you like.

Tom Montgomery
12-31-2012, 05:42 PM
White bean soup with leftover ham and the bone.

I know it is a traditional New Year's dish in the south but I eat Hoppin' John (black peas and rice) the year 'round. Mmmm....

Durnik
12-31-2012, 06:14 PM
Well, I guess it's different all 'round, but I have two invites here in TN for tomorrow & with both of them, it's hog jowl (http://littlerock.about.com/od/festivals/a/Black-Eyed-Peas-For-New-Years-Luck_2.htm), black eyed peas, collards or cabbage & custard..

Since I'm a doldarned yankee, far be it from me to correct them - I'll just be happy that two families want to share the New Years Luck with me - & doubly glad that one has a tradition of breakfast.. & the other, dinner!

I am going to be sooo stuffed tomorrow! ;-)

Happy New Year whatever you feast on! ;-)
bobby

Paul Pless
12-31-2012, 06:18 PM
it's hog jowl (http://littlerock.about.com/od/festivals/a/Black-Eyed-Peas-For-New-Years-Luck_2.htm), It don't make a lick of difference as long as its smoked salted pork. It goes back to slave days, when they was given the cheapest foods available, peas and collards and cuts of meat like feet, tongue, snout, tail, hocks, etc etc. . .

Real southern barbecue came to us the same way, a way to cook otherwise tough and cheap meat slowly over smoke to make it taste good.

Tom Montgomery
12-31-2012, 06:25 PM
From Serious Pig by John and Matt Lewis Thorne:


Every indication points to hoppin' John coming to the American South from [the slaves of] the Carribbean Islands, since at least some etymologists believe that "hoppin John" is a corruption of pois a pigeon (especially if the a is elided in the Creole manner to make pois pigeon [pwaah-peejon]). Pigeon peas were another bean brought from Africa to the Americas. Although widely prolific in the West Indies, they have not flourished in this country, and cowpeas have more or less supplanted them.

Cut off from the source of the name and gentrified into "hopping John," hoppin' John became a meaningless phrase, and folk etymology evolved to supply the necessary "explanations," as did, for example, Harriet Ross Colquitt in The Savannah Cookbook (1933):

"As children, it was our custom, when word went round we were to have hoppin' John for dinner, to gather in the dining room and as the dish was brought forth to hop around the table before sitting down to the feast."

It eventually wended its way into the American Heritage Cookbook, where, bereft of the ingenuousness of young Harriet, it becomes a condescending platitude:

"The name [hoppin' John] may have been derived from the custom that children must hop once around the table before the dish is served or may have been the sobriquet of a lively waiter."

Or . . . well, others still tell of a certain John who came "a-hoppin'" when his wife took the dish from the stove; still others of an otherwise obscure South Carolina custom of inviting a guest to eat by saying, 'Hop in, John."

In all probability, hoppin' John — name and dish — was brought to this country by slaves transported from the rice plantations in the West Indies to those in Louisiana and South Carolina, especially the Gullah country in back of Charleston. From there it eventually spread throughout the South, ultimately to win blacks and whites alike a partisan loyalty equal only to that held by grits and barbecue.

Lew Barrett
12-31-2012, 06:56 PM
About 15% are Jews and they all happy dig into the BEP's and Ham Hock. Ham Hock is a southern seasoning, and chicken will season the peas just as good if you like.

Chez moi, 100% of the inhabitants have eaten piggies, but that's not the same as saying it's Jewish food ;) (My daughters don't prefer meat of any kind, but that's not on a religious basis). I have puerco products in the house at the moment, but nobody would ever accuse us of being kosher.....on so many levels.

I'll eat your beans, Bud! They sound delish. L'chaim and HNY!

Lew Barrett
12-31-2012, 07:02 PM
...........when they was given the cheapest foods available, peas and collards and cuts of meat like feet, tongue, snout, tail, hocks, etc etc. . .


I'd never eaten pig's tail until last week. BW and the family were in town and as is becoming tradition, we all had dinner together. We ate at The Palace Kitchen (Tom Douglas' casual but near fine dining spot) and they had pig's tail on the appetizer menu. Being an adventurous Jew, I ordered it up. Blew me away.....spectacular. Crunchy, fatty, porky, just great. Brian can verify I ate everything but the squeal.

Durnik
12-31-2012, 07:04 PM
It don't make a lick of difference as long as its smoked salted pork. It goes back to slave days, when they was given the cheapest foods available, peas and collards and cuts of meat like feet, tongue, snout, tail, hocks, etc etc. . .


Gotcha, thanks.. tho I think I'll not 'correct' either of my hosts.. 'give thanks' & all that.. ;-)

The local (Spring Street) IGA has a bin of hog jowls just for the country folk who can imagine no other. I like that (the stores) attitude. Except for nothing organic - darn - they have good stuff & good prices - & the old timers/country folk still shop there. It's interesting to see _real_ country folks walking around town alongside yuppie kids driving fancy cars their parents bought them.. Heck of a Clashing of Cultures.

enjoy
bobby

pefjr
12-31-2012, 08:14 PM
Chez moi, 100% of the inhabitants have eaten piggies, but that's not the same as saying it's Jewish food ;) (My daughters don't prefer meat of any kind, but that's not on a religious basis). I have puerco products in the house at the moment, but nobody would ever accuse us of being kosher.....on so many levels.

I'll eat your beans, Bud! They sound delish. L'chaim and HNY!You can call the Rabbi anything you want , but don't call him late for a pork BBQ.

A good read for you. http://theflyfishingrabbi.blogspot.com/

David G
12-31-2012, 08:20 PM
I'm gonna miss the oysters this year. At $40+\bu. it's not in the budget.

Doug

We had the traditional Christmas Eve oyster feast at a friend's house. I do love me some oysters! For 60+ years, her family has been making scalloped oysters on xmas eve. She adds some other versions as well. I like fried best of all.

pefjr
12-31-2012, 08:24 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acxnmaVTlZA

Paul Girouard
12-31-2012, 08:33 PM
We do a pork and sour Kraut thing, a roast pork , I think. Real good , German in heritage at least that what my wife sez. Taste great , love it! It does give a guy a _touch_ of the blow, if you get my drift!

Paul Pless
01-01-2013, 09:33 AM
Paul, Can we (OK ,I) have your recipe for skillet corn bread?
Mine sucks.

Doug

I use Bob's Red Mill Stone Ground Cornbread Mix and follow the directions on the back, doubling the recipe because I use a large skillet, and that I add 1/4 cup sugar to the mix. Its important not to over stir the mixture, just enough for it all to be combined. To do the skillet, preheat the oven to 450 with the skillet in the oven pregreased with vegetable oil. When it reaches temp pour the mixture into the skillet and then turn the oven down to 350 and let it bake for 25 minutes. The hard part is letting it cool before cutting into it. . .:D

http://www.vitacost.com/Images/Products/1000/Bobs-Red-Mill/Bobs-Red-Mill-Cornbread-Mix-039978002228.jpg

FWIW, my mom's maid makes the best cornbread I've ever had, and she does the whole thing from scratch, corn meal, all purpose flour, eggs, baking soda, sugar, and she does it without really measuring. . . I told her son who works for me that his mom made the best cornbread and he said, "Nope, my grandmomma does!" I found out that she (the grandmother) uses Jiffy Mix.:D

pefjr
01-01-2013, 08:51 PM
I discovered deep fried garlic cloves tonight. I just tried a few as an experiment when frying french fries, but I will have a big bowl of cloves ready to fry next time.