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View Full Version : Readers Digest Scams Elderly



Steve McMahon
12-11-2012, 03:21 PM
My stepfathers children discovered he has been spending over $30,000.00 a year buying worthless junk from Readers digest so he can get that big half million check they keep promising him. Two months ago his children cancelled his account. My family just discovered that he is (was) now using Mom's account and in two months had run up the bill to almost $4,000.00! Two of my brothers are power of attorney for Mom, I suggested to them to not bother paying the bill. It drives me nuts that these companies get away with this. Don't even get me started on all the worthless insurance both of them have been sold over the last few years by the Banks they have dealt with for years. Hundreds of dollars a month for travel insurance for a couple of 80 year olds with early stage dementia that are not capable of travel beyond a short ride in a car as passengers.

Nicholas Scheuer
12-11-2012, 03:29 PM
And Readers Digest is supposed to be such a wholesome entity.

Steve McMahon
12-11-2012, 03:53 PM
And so are the Canadian Banks that have call centers full of immigrants pushing useless insurance to people they have full personal data on so they know it's useless to them.

B_B
12-11-2012, 03:56 PM
And so are the Canadian Banks that have call centers full of immigrants pushing useless insurance to people they have full personal data on so they know it's useless to them.
Dude, that's uncalled for.

It's the banks, not the workers.

Who do you think makes bank policy? WASPS. Danged sons if immigrants. ;)

pefjr
12-11-2012, 05:59 PM
I guess RD twisted your stepfather's arm? Held him down and forced him? His buying binge sounds like his problem not RD's.

B_B
12-11-2012, 06:21 PM
I guess RD twisted your stepfather's arm? Held him down and forced him? His buying binge sounds like his problem not RD's.
The 'dementia' part went right over your head.

pefjr
12-11-2012, 06:25 PM
The 'dementia' part went right over your head.RD like thousands of other companies sell things via the media. I guess you want to shut them all down.

Glen Longino
12-11-2012, 06:33 PM
I guess RD twisted your stepfather's arm? Held him down and forced him? His buying binge sounds like his problem not RD's.

True to form for Peffer!
If he ever comes down on the righteous side of an issue many here will be shocked!!!!!!!!!!:D

B_B
12-11-2012, 06:50 PM
RD like thousands of other companies sell things via the media. I guess you want to shut them all down.
At your age I'd be careful what I wish for....

Tom Hunter
12-11-2012, 07:06 PM
Readers Digest has been marketing that offer for at least 30 years. Why did he suddenly start buying stuff? Is he ill? Did he change meds, or is he suffering from dementia? I'm not sure its completely fair to blame the company for doing the same thing for decades because someone is suddenly making financial decisions that you think are bad. I'm inclined to think they are bad too, but I don't think the story is "readers digest comes up with nefarious new marketing sceme, scams my family" there is certainly more to it.

pefjr
12-11-2012, 07:09 PM
At your age I'd be careful what I wish for....What? Wish for? Look up scam. This is a tabloid type OP. If you can't determine this on your own, then you are the one that needs to be careful. In the US I believe it is a law that the odds of winning one of these sweepstakes is printed on the offer. These people need looking after, not RD, and maybe you should refresh your math skills.

B_B
12-11-2012, 08:37 PM
... If you can't determine this on your own, then you are the one that needs to be careful...
That's the point. They can't. But you knew that when you read 'power of attorney' and 'dementia'. Sadly your dementia prevented you from giving a flock.

pefjr
12-11-2012, 09:03 PM
That's the point. They can't. And that is a Reader's Digest scam?

B_B
12-11-2012, 09:17 PM
RD cannot be held accountable. It is not their responsibility to research the decision making abilities of their customers....
HA! They spend billions to discover the decision making abilities of their customers.

Waddie
12-11-2012, 09:18 PM
Hell must've just frozen over. I agree with Doug...... :)

regards,
Waddie

Steve McMahon
12-11-2012, 09:28 PM
Dude, that's uncalled for.

It's the banks, not the workers.

Who do you think makes bank policy? WASPS. Danged sons if immigrants. ;)

Correct you are. That didn't come out right. I believe the banks are at fault. I meant that the poor immigrants (who can't get any better job than the bank's sweatshops) are being forced to push this crap on the unwary seniors for the profit of the banks. Their pay which they require for their survival is based on sales quotas and their scripts are written in such a way that pushes the limits of what is legal in coersion.

Steve McMahon
12-11-2012, 09:31 PM
I guess RD twisted your stepfather's arm? Held him down and forced him? His buying binge sounds like his problem not RD's.

RD knows exactly what they are doing. Take a look at the TONS of material they send to people with misleading bold print and disclaimers in very fine print. They are preying on the weak minded.

Steve McMahon
12-11-2012, 09:33 PM
Readers Digest has been marketing that offer for at least 30 years. Why did he suddenly start buying stuff? Is he ill? Did he change meds, or is he suffering from dementia? I'm not sure its completely fair to blame the company for doing the same thing for decades because someone is suddenly making financial decisions that you think are bad. I'm inclined to think they are bad too, but I don't think the story is "readers digest comes up with nefarious new marketing sceme, scams my family" there is certainly more to it.

Nope, nothing new here. They have been doing it for many years. Yes he is suffering from Dementia as I allready indicated. Just because they have been doing it for decades doesn't mean it is ethical. He is their target market.

Steve McMahon
12-11-2012, 09:39 PM
RD cannot be held accountable. It is not their responsibility to research the decision making abilities of their customers.
If someone has power of attorney over the couple's finances then it seems to me that they are the person(s) being negligent.

Doug

They should be held accountable for predatory marketing aimed at vulnerable people. In fact they were in the US with a class action law suit. In Canada it is much harder to launch such a thing because of our laws. There is a tipping point for families with the power of attorney thing. It isn't black and white as to when this happens and how it happens. In my Mothers case it was obvious when it was required and she went along with it voluntarily. In my stepfathers case he was very private about his affairs, didn't show any easily recognizable signs of needing help, and is resisting his kids efforts to help at every turn.

Waddie
12-11-2012, 09:48 PM
Isn't the entire world's economic and political systems based on the principle of preying on the weak minded? Isn't this what marketing is all about, everywhere? Ever watched MadMen on TV ? Is this something new in the world? Caveat Emptor!!!! Only a far left liberal would think it possible to regulate it out of existence. While very few regulations actually work as intended, there are always ways around them. Pass more if you think they will make a difference, just be realistic about it.

Accept the financial damage, Don't let the stepfather handle money anymore. Be glad he didn't buy a reverse mortgage...

regards,
Waddie

Phillip Allen
12-11-2012, 09:50 PM
The 'greater fool' principal, Waddie

Shang
12-11-2012, 10:04 PM
Readers Digest has been marketing that offer for at least 30 years. Why did he suddenly start buying stuff? Is he ill? Did he change meds, or is he suffering from dementia? I'm not sure its completely fair to blame the company for doing the same thing for decades because someone is suddenly making financial decisions that you think are bad. I'm inclined to think they are bad too, but I don't think the story is "readers digest comes up with nefarious new marketing sceme, scams my family" there is certainly more to it.

No, I don't believe that there is more to it than appears at face value. Readers Digest has been fronting for this scam for at least 30 years. They have bilked people who were naïve, or eldery, for three decades. Their modus operandi is to troll for their prey, “Just send us some more money to purchase this next round of (expensive, worthless crap) so we can keep your name on our list of Assured Winners...”

They should be stopped, or better yet, arrested.

Trolls who speak to the contrary do not know what they are talking about.

When we cleaned out my father's house after he passed away in his nineties, we found his letters to the company asking why they had not yet delivered the huge check they had promised. After all, he said, he had purchased all of the merchandise they had required of Assured Winners.

Steve McMahon
12-11-2012, 10:07 PM
Isn't the entire world's economic and political systems based on the principle of preying on the weak minded? Isn't this what marketing is all about, everywhere? Ever watched MadMen on TV ? Is this something new in the world? Caveat Emptor!!!! Only a far left liberal would think it possible to regulate it out of existence. While very few regulations actually work as intended, there are always ways around them. Pass more if you think they will make a difference, just be realistic about it.

Accept the financial damage, Don't let the stepfather handle money anymore. Be glad he didn't buy a reverse mortgage...

regards,
Waddie

No I have not watched MadMen on TV. I am glad that he didn't buy a reverse mortgage, and I am realistic. All that being said It still pisses me off that these corperations make a fortune off of the vulnerable and they know full well what they are doing and who buys their crap. We are not accepting the financial damage on Mom's account, RD will not be paid. I am sorry that my stepfather's children didn't catch it sooner. I am glad my Brothers who are POA for Mom caught it when they did.

Steve McMahon
12-11-2012, 10:10 PM
No, I don't believe that there is more to it than appears at face value. Readers Digest has been fronting for this scam for at least 30 years. They have bilked people who were naïve, or eldery, for three decades. Their modus operandi is to troll for their prey, “Just send us some more money to purchase this next round of (expensive, worthless crap) so we can keep your name on our list of Assured Winners...”

They should be stopped, or better yet, arrested.

Trolls who speak to the contrary do not know what they are talking about.

When we cleaned out my father's house after he passed away in his nineties, we found his letters to the company asking why they had not yet delivered the huge check they had promised. After all, he said, he had purchased all of the merchandise they had required of Assured Winners.

Bingo. It breaks my heart. I will never again even pick up a RD at my doctors office. As a matter of fact I'm going to give my doctor crap about accepting the free copies they litter his office with. Small gesture perhaps, but we all have to have our principles.

Shang
12-11-2012, 10:22 PM
Isn't the entire world's economic and political systems based on the principle of preying on the weak minded? Isn't this what marketing is all about, everywhere? Ever watched MadMen on TV ? Is this something new in the world? Caveat Emptor!!!! Only a far left liberal would think it possible to regulate it out of existence. While very few regulations actually work as intended, there are always ways around them. Pass more if you think they will make a difference, just be realistic about it.

Accept the financial damage, Don't let the stepfather handle money anymore. Be glad he didn't buy a reverse mortgage...

regards,
Waddie

Good thinking! "The entire world's economic...systems [are]based on...preying on the weak minded..."
So you'll be happy to bend over and take it as soon as we figure out a scheme that socks it too you when you cannot protect yourself, but is hard to regulate out of existence?

By the way, for those who may have forgotten their Latin,
Caveat Emptor does not translate, "Let the buyer beware."
it literally states, "Beware of the seller."

Waddie
12-11-2012, 10:29 PM
No I have not watched MadMen on TV. I am glad that he didn't buy a reverse mortgage, and I am realistic. All that being said It still pisses me off that these corperations make a fortune off of the vulnerable and they know full well what they are doing and who buys their crap. We are not accepting the financial damage on Mom's account, RD will not be paid. I am sorry that my stepfather's children didn't catch it sooner. I am glad my Brothers who are POA for Mom caught it when they did.

I do fully understand how you feel, and what I meant by accepting the financial damage is what's already been done. I wouldn't send them another dime either. What can they do? They won't sue, as they wouldn't want the bad press. The less their scam becomes an issue, the better for them. So while we should fight against them, don't expect too much. And realistically, these kinds of things have gone on since the beginning of mankind. Didn't Eve scam Adam into biting that apple ??

regards,
Waddie

Donn
12-11-2012, 10:30 PM
By the way, for those who may have forgotten their Latin,
Caveat Emptor does not translate, "Let the buyer beware."
it literally states, "Beware of the seller."

Horse hockey.

Waddie
12-11-2012, 10:31 PM
Shang; Good thinking! "The entire world's economic...systems [are]based on...preying on the weak minded..."
So you'll be happy to bend over and take it as soon as we figure out a scheme that socks it too you when you cannot protect yourself, but is hard to regulate out of existence?

only if it affected you...


By the way, for those who may have forgotten their Latin,
Caveat Emptor does not translate, "Let the buyer beware."
it literally states, "Beware of the seller."

a distinction without a difference....

regards,
Waddie

Meli
12-12-2012, 03:45 AM
Hmm, RD used to do that sort of thing over here. I think it is illegal now.
certainlynRD sales have dropped since I was a kid.
you guys seriously need some regulation.

Steve McMahon
12-12-2012, 08:37 AM
Hmm, RD used to do that sort of thing over here. I think it is illegal now.
certainlynRD sales have dropped since I was a kid.
you guys seriously need some regulation.

Yes we do.
I also just got through sorting through the insurance documents for Mom. As she became less aware she fell for every insurance add-on sales pitch from every credit card company and every bank she delt with. Sadly Canada deregulated the insurance industry a dozen years ago or so allowing the big banks to sell it and this is the result.

John Meachen
12-12-2012, 03:28 PM
I have a bit of experience with this organisation,or perhaps just one commission hunter on their payroll.A few years ago they sent my father a bill for a subscription and I queried it with them.I phoned and quoted their reference number just to make sure of the facts.The operative assured me that he had a subscription form on file and I asked what date was on it."October third"he said and I replied that that was very interesting since my father had died on October 2nd.Never heard from them again.

Bram V
12-12-2012, 03:53 PM
I worked for a company for a few horrible months handling things like ending subscriptions for people who had lost their financial independence or died or some such. Not much fun, but if you send the paperwork it was dealt with quickly. This was a budget internet provider, but like principles should apply elsewhere.