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Rum_Pirate
12-09-2012, 03:46 PM
Pity

Has anyone here eaten real Kobe beef ?



Food's Biggest Scam: The Great Kobe Beef Lie

These are cuts of the famous Kobe beef from Hyogo prefecture in Japan. Note the exquisite marbling of fat throughout. To see it in person, you need to go to Japan, because real Kobe beef cannot be found in the U.S.


Think you’ve tasted the famous Japanese Kobe beef?


Think again.


Of course, there are a small number of you out there who have tried it – I did, in Tokyo, and it is delicious.
If you ever go to Japan I heartily recommend you splurge, because while it is expensive, it is unique, and you cannot get it in the United States.
Not as steaks, not as burgers, certainly not as the ubiquitous “Kobe sliders” at your trendy neighborhood “bistro.”


That’s right. You heard me. I did not misspeak. I am not confused like most of the American food media.


I will state this as clearly as possible:



Food's Biggest Scam, Part 2: "Domestic" Kobe And Wagyu Beef
Larry Olmsted
Contributor

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You cannot buy Japanese Kobe beef in this country. Not in stores, not by mail, and certainly not in restaurants. No matter how much you have spent, how fancy a steakhouse you went to, or which of the many celebrity chefs who regularly feature “Kobe beef” on their menus you believed, you were duped. I’m really sorry to have to be the one telling you this, but no matter how much you would like to believe you have tasted it, if it wasn’t in Asia you almost certainly have never had Japan’s famous Kobe beef.


UPDATE: There was a dramatic change to the USDA’s rules for Japanese beef importation on August 27, 2012 which is not reflected in this article. I have posted an up-to-date follow piece explaining the change and current situation here.


You may have had an imitation from the Midwest, Great Plains, South America or Australia, where they produce a lot of what I call “Faux-be” beef. You may have even had a Kobe imposter from Japan before 2010. It is now illegal to import (or even hand carry for personal consumption) any Japanese beef. Before 2010 you could import only boneless fresh Japanese beef, but none was real Kobe. Under Japanese law, Kobe beef can only came from Hyogo prefecture (of which Kobe is the capital city), where no slaughterhouses were approved for export by the USDA. According to its own trade group, the Kobe Beef Marketing & Distribution Promotion Association in Japan, where Kobe Beef is a registered trademark, Macao is the only place it is exported to – and only since last year. If you had real Kobe beef in this country in recent years, someone probably smuggled it in their luggage.


“How is this possible?” you ask, when you see the virtues of Kobe being touted on television food shows, by famous chefs, and on menus all over the country? A dozen burger joints in Las Vegas alone offer Kobe burgers. Google it and you will find dozens of online vendors happy to take your money and ship you very pricey steaks. Restaurant reviews in the New York Times have repeatedly praised the “Kobe beef” served at high-end Manhattan restaurants. Not an issue of any major food magazine goes by without reinforcing the great fat Kobe beef lie. So how could I possibly be right?


The answer is sadly simplistic: Despite the fact that Kobe Beef, as well as Kobe Meat and Kobe Cattle, are patented terms and/or trademarks in Japan, these are neither recognized nor protected by U.S. law. As far as regulators here are concerned, Kobe beef, unlike say Florida Orange Juice, means almost nothing (the “beef” part should still come from cows). Like the recent surge in the use of the unregulated label term “natural,” it is an adjective used mainly to confuse consumers and profit from that confusion. Another popular premium food , Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, “The King of Cheeses,” suffers from the same problem and I examine it here.


This matters because the reason food lovers and expense account diners want Kobe beef, and are willing to pay a huge premium for it, is because of the real Kobe’s longstanding reputation for excellence. The con the US food industry is running is leading you to believe that what you are paying huge dollars for – like the $40 NYC “Kobe” burger – is somehow linked to this heritage of excellence. It’s not.


All the myths about cows getting massages and drinking beer while listening to classical music are just that, myths, but nonetheless real Kobe beef is produced under some of the world’s strictest legal food standards, whereas “domestic Kobe” beef production, along with that in Australia and South America, is as regulated as the Wild West. In Japan, to be Kobe requires a pure lineage of Tajima-gyu breed cattle (not any old Japanese breed crossbred with American cattle as is the norm here). The animal must also have been born in Hyogo prefecture and thus raised on the local grasses and water and terroir its entire life. It must be a bull or virgin cow, and it takes considerably longer to raise a Tajima-gyu for consumption than most other breeds, adding to the cost. It must be processed in a Hyogo slaughterhouse – none of which export to the US – and then pass a strict government grading exam. There are only 3000 head of certified Kobe Beef cattle in the world, and none are outside Japan. The process is so strict that when the beef is sold, either in stores or restaurants, it must carry the 10-digit identification number so customers know what particular Tajima-gyu cow it came from.

Vince Brennan
12-09-2012, 03:51 PM
What the hell does this have to do with wooden boats? Egads! Wat an egregious troll this person is.

Paul Girouard
12-09-2012, 03:53 PM
What the hell does this have to do with wooden boats? Egads! Wat an egregious troll this person is.

About as much as any other bilge thread , get over it Froggie!

Andrew Craig-Bennett
12-09-2012, 03:55 PM
I have had Kobe beef - in Toyko. I have also been to a geisha house - in Shimizu*.

I have had quite a lot of nice, very tender, beef in other places.

It resembles the real thing much as a girlie bar resembles a geisha house.

* In the company of a peeress, I might add.

Rum_Pirate
12-09-2012, 04:06 PM
What the hell does this have to do with wooden boats? Egads! Wat an egregious troll this person is.



e·gre·gious/iˈgrējəs/



Adjective




Outstandingly bad; shocking.
Remarkably good.




Which definition are you purporting to use in your post?





Would you prefer I only post on American politics?
I thought that this topic would be a good change.
I guess you can't please everyone.:ycool:

Mrleft8
12-09-2012, 04:10 PM
Who cares? Anyone stupid enough to pay $40 for a burger deserves what they get.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
12-09-2012, 04:14 PM
Who cares? Anyone stupid enough to pay $40 for a burger deserves what they get.

The idea of putting Kobe beef into a burger is absurd and distasteful - a bit like adding Coke to Chateau Latour.

Rum_Pirate
12-09-2012, 04:17 PM
I was considering setting up a little enterprise.

Caribbean Cobe beef and forming a niche market.

I could get say 500 acres (lease from Govt)
With recommendation and research import a breeding pair.
I have a Vet training Uni here which could (I had a professor on board) supply medical supervision and treatment with the students learning (practical) at the same time, all at low low cost.
The brewery here could supply beer to be fed to the stock at a wholesale price (could include their name in the advertising).
The cattle would be fed grass, not antibiotic dosed, recycled chicken sh!t etc feed.
The prime beef would be exported - chilled. Direct flights to London,UK, the USA, St.Barths, Anguilla etc.
It would be marketed as a limited cache treasure trove item.
The lesser cuts would be sold locally as well.




PS I was considering feeding the cattle marijuana bushes for the last two week. I wonder what would be the effect to the beef?

Mrleft8
12-09-2012, 04:26 PM
Buffalypso worked out so well for that niche export market, eh? :D
Take the bad attitude of a Water Buffalo, and mix it with the stringy, lean, flavorless meat of a longhorn steer, and what do you get? Buffalypso! A cattle breed that can survive the harsh climate of the Caribbean, and is so universally disliked by both cooks and consumers that it'd basically guaranteed to survive forever! :D

Tom Montgomery
12-09-2012, 04:31 PM
There is a sucker born every minute... and two to catch him.

Rum_Pirate
12-09-2012, 04:39 PM
Buffalypso worked out so well for that niche export market, eh? :D
Take the bad attitude of a Water Buffalo, and mix it with the stringy, lean, flavorless meat of a longhorn steer, and what do you get? Buffalypso! A cattle breed that can survive the harsh climate of the Caribbean, and is so universally disliked by both cooks and consumers that it'd basically guaranteed to survive forever! :D

You have got my interest. I's never heard of Buffalypso. What is your source (bad attitude and stringy, lean, flavorless meat and is so universally disliked by both cooks and consumers) ?

If you care to read my post you would see that my proposal (there was another reason not to proceed) would not have fallen foul of that problem.

Mind you there was a chap here that bred Santa Gertrudis
http://www.santagertrudis.com/portals/141/bull_home.jpg

and then cross bred them with Zebu

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-oQ4ugkdNFYk/TaLZodRIO6I/AAAAAAAACOE/f4yPO9tJ57w/s1600/zebu_cow_and_calf.jpe.

purri
12-09-2012, 04:48 PM
If you like exotic beef then try wild Banteng.

Tom Montgomery
12-09-2012, 04:50 PM
I pay a little extra at the local Pub & Grill for a bison burger. They are raised, slaughtered, and processed locally.

Ummm good!

Rum_Pirate
12-09-2012, 07:33 PM
This put the final nail in the coffin, although I had previously shelved the idea.

http://www.in-cumbria.com/dream-comes-to-an-end-1.939611?referrerPath=tributespaidaftersuddendeath ofcumbriantownsmayor1860581#



‘DREAM’ COMES TO AN END
Last updated at 15:08, Monday, 02 April 2012
A FORMER farm owner has said a sad goodbye to his beloved herd of rare cattle after a rival businessman made him an offer he could not refuse.
Lakes hotelier Jonathan Denby kept his 12 pure-bred Wagyus, even after selling his High Lowscales Farm, near Millom, in January last year.
Mr Denby was determined to hold onto the valuable herd, which he bred himself using frozen embryos from Japan, where the highly sought after cattle originate.
But he has now agreed to part with his herd, which have been looked after for him by a Cartmel farmer since he sold High Lowscales.
He says he was offered a “handsome” amount of money, which cannot be revealed because of a confidentiality agreement with the buyer.
Mr Denby said: “Unbeknown to me, at the same time as I started my breeding programme, Andrew Deacon, a retired businessman in Suffolk, was also establishing a Wagyu herd.
“After seeing my herd on BBC1’s Countryfile, Andrew came to see my herd in Cartmel and he made me an offer I couldn’t refuse.”
Mr Denby realised his dream of establishing the first ever pure-bred Wagyu herd in England eight years ago.
He travelled to Japan to research the cattle, famed for being the source of Kobe-style beef, the “caviar of the meat world”.
Four years ago, the first calves were born on his farm at the same time as Mr Deacon was establishing his herd.
Mr Deacon holds an exclusive contract to supply celebrity chef Raymond Blanc with Wagyu beef for his restaurants, including two-Michelin star establishment Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons.
Mr Denby said: “Raymond Blanc is my favourite chef and Le Manoir is my favourite restaurant.
“I am absolutely delighted my cattle are going to be in very, very good hands and will be going to the best final destination. I put an awful lot of time, effort and money into the product, but the price I received means I have been able to recapture my investment in the animals. Although I’m very sad to see my animals go, this is the best possible ending to my dream.”

First published at 13:08, Friday, 30 March 2012
Published by http://www.nwemail.co.uk (http://www.nwemail.co.uk/)