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View Full Version : Seattle CL Find: Neptune Wood Stove



Nicholas Carey
12-08-2012, 11:30 AM
http://seattle.craigslist.org/see/boa/3454863266.html

Neptune wood stove for a boat. $325. Looks to be in decent shape (but could use some stove blacking). Sez it comes with the Charlie Noble, too.

http://images.craigslist.org/3Ke3Ie3p35L85Q25Mdcc43061038bbc3019e5.jpg

Breakaway
12-08-2012, 12:04 PM
Question: Since the closest clearance, per NFPA, for a residential woodstove, using a modern stove with appropriate heat shielding, is 12 inches to the nearest combustible, how does it work in a boat cabin?

I realize boats with stoves aren't all burning to the waterline, just asking what the details of the install might be....

Kevin

Binnacle Bat
12-08-2012, 09:27 PM
I've heated with wood for 30 odd years, and installed a few stoves in that time. Reviewing the specs on various stoves with and without heat shields, it seems that a heat shield cuts the allowable distance to combustibles in half. My theory is that a second heat shield would cut it in half again, not that I've pushed things that far.

The ratings on residential wood stoves I think are based on worst case scenarios, i.e. fill it up with kindling to the rings, leave the dampers wide open and torch it off. The above Neptune has a small firebox, and wouldn't get as hot as a straight off heating stove. Presumably the stack wouldn't be too tall, so there won't be too much draft.

I would think that two layers of sheet metal (probably stainless), with 3/4" non-conductive spacers between the two layers, and 6-8 inches clearance might be enough.

Remember that the stove pipe will need shielding too, if with in 18" or so of a bulkhead or overhead.

Also, especially on a sailboat, the stove should be set up so the firebox door opens forward or aft, so hot coals don't spill over the cabin sole if heeled hard over.

Allan

Yeadon
12-08-2012, 10:38 PM
Is that something I could use to heat my 24x14 shop? It's a very appealing little stove.

Binnacle Bat
12-08-2012, 11:05 PM
Is that something I could use to heat my 24x14 shop? It's a very appealing little stove.

Yeadon

I think you'd want something bigger. The Neptune is as much a cook stove as a heater (the big door on the right is the oven). It's not clear from the photos, but it may be designed for coal. Can't really tell from the CL photos.

You'd want what's called a box stove, or better, that you could fit 16-18" long logs in, and not have to stoke every half hour.

Allan

jsjpd1
12-08-2012, 11:25 PM
It is a very cool stove, too bad it's a little large for our CY.

Old Dryfoot
12-09-2012, 12:54 AM
I have no practical use for it what so ever, but I still want it!

Yeadon
12-09-2012, 12:55 AM
Yeadon

I think you'd want something bigger. The Neptune is as much a cook stove as a heater (the big door on the right is the oven). It's not clear from the photos, but it may be designed for coal. Can't really tell from the CL photos.

You'd want what's called a box stove, or better, that you could fit 16-18" long logs in, and not have to stoke every half hour.

Allan

Thanks. Seems like there's a trade off at hand. I stay small and I don't get enough heat. I go big and lose space in my shop.

pcford
12-09-2012, 01:00 AM
Thanks. Seems like there's a trade off at hand. I stay small and I don't get enough heat. I go big and lose space in my shop.

By the way...meant to write...you need a much bigger shop, I understand you are going to lengthen it. Don't underestimate how much of a pain low ceilings are.

Nicholas Carey
12-09-2012, 01:46 AM
Thanks. Seems like there's a trade off at hand. I stay small and I don't get enough heat. I go big and lose space in my shop.

You might want to take a look at la Petit Godin. It's a French stove, designed to burn wood or anthracite (coal) as I understand it. Toploader...but it's 41 cm in diameter. Been in production for something like 170 years. They show up on Craig's List fairly regularly in Seattle for what seems to be reasonable prices.

http://chemineesgodin.fr/fr/index.php?page=shop.browse&category_id=8&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=26

http://www.castorama.fr/images/products/i/i_562665.jpg

Here's a Youtube video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Qp8VWRB-m4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Qp8VWRB-m4

Welding Rod
12-24-2012, 01:31 PM
Question: Since the closest clearance, per NFPA, for a residential woodstove, using a modern stove with appropriate heat shielding, is 12 inches to the nearest combustible, how does it work in a boat cabin?

I realize boats with stoves aren't all burning to the waterline, just asking what the details of the install might be....

Kevin

I think the closest to a combustable wall is 36 inches unless the stove has been tested and rated for closer. A combustable wall is a wall that has "ANY" combustable material in it. I put 5/8 fire rated sheetrock with 1/2" slate around my stove. Its still a combustable wall, cause its wood framed.

Bo Curtis
12-30-2012, 11:25 PM
I really need to look at the forum more. I would have jumped at this had I seen it in time. In response to numerous replies: I had a Neptune on a 22' pocket cruiser, installed only inches from combustible bulkheads, which I lined with tile and copper. We had it for 19 years, without burning things down. When we got the boat it had this stove as well as a gasoline engine, which was a bit scary. We burned coal, shop scraps, small branches, what have you. We baked muffins in the oven. It was a wonderful stove, and I'd replace my Dickinson Bering with another one in a heartbeat if I could find one, which is why I'm kicking myself for not seeing this. My Dad, by the way, has a Petit Godin in his house in Connecticut.

If I had a few thousand to burn I'd get a new Shipmate or Halibut.

Paul356
12-31-2012, 06:24 PM
I think the closest to a combustable wall is 36 inches unless the stove has been tested and rated for closer. A combustable wall is a wall that has "ANY" combustable material in it. I put 5/8 fire rated sheetrock with 1/2" slate around my stove. Its still a combustable wall, cause its wood framed.

The current WoodenBoat has photos of a number of wood stove installations and heat shields, etc., that are used. And an article.

Soundman67
01-02-2013, 01:45 AM
http://vancouver.en.craigslist.ca/nvn/for/3509940630.html
This one is in Vancouver.

gilberj
01-02-2013, 11:50 AM
In my case all the surfaces close to the stove are insulated with 3/8" cement board and metal sheeting. All the materials were stuff I had around. None of the surfaces, most notably behind the stove where the distance is the least have ever got hotter than I could hold my hand on.

Garret
01-02-2013, 02:59 PM
36" is most definitely not necessary for any normal installation.

I have a Petit Godin (as pictured above) which is 18" from sheetrock with a copper sheet on 1" standoffs (porcelain fence insulators). The sheetrock never gets above skin temp - even cranking the stove for days. Note that it's important to have space at the top & bottom of the sheet so that the air behind it can move (the heat creates a chimney effect behind the sheet, which is what keeps the wall cool).

In a boat - I've seen stainless sheet on the surface & another an inch away on standoffs with a woodstove 6" from that with no problem.

If you're getting your stove red hot, then all bets are off - but you do know you're not supposed to get it that hot, right?

Also - as mentioned above - do not neglect the chimney! It will get hotter than the stove.

Soundman67
01-02-2013, 04:00 PM
I wonder if the Dickenson Pacific I have gets as hot as a wood stove. It is half an inch from the heat shield and the shield is only 3/4 inch from the wall on standoffs. I think its been there being used all winter long for a long long time. No sign of excess heat behind the shield.