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Don S
11-30-2012, 07:30 PM
I'm making a pair of oars sorta after the Pete Culler tradition. Lot of workarounds because I don't have a bandsaw.

The bright idea I have is to glue in some hardwood tips for durability. I'm still at the basic blank gluing stage ( 3/4" pieces cut from select pine from Lowes). So the blade end is still 3/4" x 4 1/2". My idea is to cut a shallow grove, say around 1" lengthwise across the tip and to cut a mating 3/4 tip with a spline to fit in the groove, glue with epoxy, etc.

But I cant figure out how to make a nice neat grove. I hesitate to simply edge glue the tip onto the blade. The tip, unfortunately, is on the end of an 8 foot stick, so I cant really use a router table or set up a router jig. Ditto for dado-like solution using table saw.

I'm pretty sure I can figure out how to cut a spline.

Any ideas????

lym95
11-30-2012, 07:46 PM
You might try a slot cutting router bit and make a separate spline. The bits I use in cabinetry cut a 1/4" slot about 9/16" deep so a 1/4" X 1" spline fits nicely.

BobW
11-30-2012, 07:55 PM
Gluing the hardwood tip to the oar oughta work fine.

A Japanese pull saw could be effective in cutting a groove in the end of the oar blank.

Bob W
Fenwick, MI
Building Gardens of Fenwick, a Welsford Pathfinder
Karen Ann, a Storer Goat Island Skiff

Don S
11-30-2012, 08:05 PM
Yeah, that's a possibility if I can figure out a way to stabilize the router without using and edge guide or a table . . . Thanks.

Don S
11-30-2012, 08:07 PM
Could very well wind up using the fine blade pull saw. I still hesitate to simply "naked" glue the tip to the blade . . . Thanks.

Gib Etheridge
11-30-2012, 08:38 PM
Do you have an wooden outfeed table on your tablesaw? It's not much work to cut a hole in it and bolt the router to the underside. Once you've gone to the trouble it will always be there for you.

I would use a 3/16 slot cutter in the router for that.

Or....

Use the table saw, or better yet the sliding compound miter saw, or failing that a rabbet plane or handsaw and chisel to remove some of each face of the oar blade leaving a tongue, then cut the groove in the hardwood on the table saw.

Woxbox
11-30-2012, 08:45 PM
I'll second using a simple butt joint. Make up a sample and see how hard you have to wack that oar tip to break it off -- and I'm betting it won't part cleanly on the glue line.

htom
11-30-2012, 08:52 PM
Dado a slot in the tip, cut a full-width tendon to fit on the oar tip.

lym95
11-30-2012, 08:58 PM
Actually, a slot cutter doesn't need a table or a router fence. It's a horizontal (parallel with the router plate) two or three wing cutter and has a ball bearing guide which limits it's depth. Google "Slotting Cut Router Bit" for a better idea of what it looks like. You just run the router across the end of the paddle and across the tip material and both are ready for a spline. With a little practice you'll be making all kinds of joints with it.

Don S
11-30-2012, 08:58 PM
Gib Etheridge_

That's a great idea, and I may yet do it, especially for future reference.. But I still foresee the amazing acrobatics of getting the 8 foot stick to be upright! Maybe I'm complicating it. But right now -- I think I have a cracked rib -- everything seems hard!

Don S
11-30-2012, 09:02 PM
Actually, a slot cutter doesn't need a table or a router fence. It's a horizontal (parallel with the router plate) two or three wing cutter and has a ball bearing guide which limits it's depth. Google "Slotting Cut Router Bit" for a better idea of what it looks like. You just run the router across the end of the paddle and across the tip material and both are ready for a spline. With a little practice you'll be making all kinds of joints with it.

OK, another bit I'm not familiar with but, with the bearing and the plate as guide, I can see how it would do the trick.

Don S
11-30-2012, 09:04 PM
Dado a slot in the tip, cut a full-width tendon to fit on the oar tip.

Yup, that's my goal. Thanks. My previous venture into oarmaking involved just wrapping the tip with fiberglas, which is fine. But the hardwood is intriguing and elegant!

JimConlin
11-30-2012, 09:09 PM
THis is a slotting router bit. Your oar would be flat on the bench.
http://www.google.com/url?source=imglanding&ct=img&q=http://www.woodcraft.com/Images/products/600/844563.jpg&sa=X&ei=kGW5UIS_GsW30AG_p4DYCg&ved=0CAsQ8wc4Rw&usg=AFQjCNGwOfvqTB_60wUBUlLxxsSbzwS2PQ

Another approach to reinforcing an oar tip is to epoxy some nylon parachute cord into a shallow groove across the tip. It's pretty tough, doesn't look like a show-off trick and has some stretch for when the blade swells& shrinks.

Don S
11-30-2012, 09:10 PM
I'll second using a simple butt joint. Make up a sample and see how hard you have to wack that oar tip to break it off -- and I'm betting it won't part cleanly on the glue line.

It may just come down to this . . .

I should say I'm relatively new to epoxy as well -- although in large doses I can say I'm not too fond of the stuff. this application, of course, is small potatoes.

Gib Etheridge
11-30-2012, 09:11 PM
Don,

I meant to cut rabbets on each face of the oar blade by making multiple pass cross cuts into the face, then clean it up with a chisel. The oar would be laying flat, assuming that the looms are still square. That would be a lot easier with the miter saw thougIt would be quite easy to do with a Japanese saw (one or two cross cuts) then a chisel.

Don S
11-30-2012, 09:13 PM
THis is a slotting router bit. Your oar would be flat on the bench.
http://www.google.com/url?source=imglanding&ct=img&q=http://www.woodcraft.com/Images/products/600/844563.jpg&sa=X&ei=kGW5UIS_GsW30AG_p4DYCg&ved=0CAsQ8wc4Rw&usg=AFQjCNGwOfvqTB_60wUBUlLxxsSbzwS2PQ

Another approach to reinforcing an oar tip is to epoxy some nylon parachute cord into a shallow groove across the tip. It's pretty tough, doesn't look like a show-off trick and has some stretch for when the blade swells& shrinks.

Thanks for the added effort. I may need that bit in any case! The parachute cord, or similar, is a another neat idea.

Don S
11-30-2012, 09:18 PM
Don,

I meant to cut rabbets on each face of the oar blade by making multiple pass cross cuts into the face, then clean it up with a chisel. The oar would be laying flat, assuming that the looms are still square. That would be a lot easier with the miter saw thougIt would be quite easy to do with a Japanese saw (one or two cross cuts) then a chisel.

Ah, I see . . . I think, though, about the scalloped hollow in the blade intersecting with the combination hard and soft wood (If I'm getting the picture right). I had thought about just rabbeting one face of the blade but that thinking got me nowhere.

Appreciate all the input!

Ron Williamson
11-30-2012, 09:23 PM
I slotted my paddles with a bandsaw,but failing that,I'd rather use a handsaw than a router or table saw.
R

Don S
11-30-2012, 09:49 PM
I slotted my paddles with a bandsaw,but failing that,I'd rather use a handsaw than a router or table saw.
R

I'm thinking, if I'm real careful, and I pack enough thicked epoxy in there, how bad can it be?

Hunky Dory
11-30-2012, 09:58 PM
I just cut a rabbitt on one side half way through about 2" wide and glue a piece of hardwood across. But I like painted oars to match the boat they go to.

Ron Williamson
11-30-2012, 10:20 PM
I'm thinking, if I'm real careful, and I pack enough thicked epoxy in there, how bad can it be?

It's select pine.I'm sure that it won't be difficult.
If you make the spline to match the cut,you might need to push the not-too-thick epoxy in with the spline itself.
Mine are about 1/16" x 1" deep.Cherry glued into cedar Greenland style kayak paddles.
R

landlocked sailor
11-30-2012, 10:42 PM
http://i1065.photobucket.com/albums/u386/landlockedsailor/6424ab648acddb2362535f6cd2e60338.jpg

Nott a great shot but this is a pair I made recently using Captain Pete's plans. They are essentially a copy of the Shaw & Tenny spoons with cherry tips. If you can make the oars it's not too big a stretch to apply the tips. I used a knife to scribe the curve on the face. Chop down about 1/8" (less than half the thickness) and rout out the waste. I used a chisel and a small routing plane. Fitting the tips is all handwork but it's not hard; we're not doing production work here people, one pair of oars should only take an hour or so. Glue in an oversized hunk the plane it down flush. I think I used epoxy but Titebond 3 should work too-I'll probably use it in the future. Lots of varnish.
Rick

Dusty Yevsky
11-30-2012, 10:53 PM
Another trick for attaching hardwood ends is using fiberglass splines. You can easily make them yourself by clamping five or six layers of 8-10 oz epoxy soaked FG between two smooth boards. The splines come out a little thinner than a handsaw blade. Use a handsaw to cut kerfs in the end of the oar and the hardwood block and then epoxy them in place. The advantage of this method is you can make the tips as thin as you like. The thinner the tip, the less noise the blade makes. Also, the joint will be stronger than the surrounding wood.

John Bailey
12-01-2012, 08:01 AM
http://i1065.photobucket.com/albums/u386/landlockedsailor/6424ab648acddb2362535f6cd2e60338.jpg

Nott a great shot but this is a pair I made recently using Captain Pete's plans. They are essentially a copy of the Shaw & Tenny spoons with cherry tips. If you can make the oars it's not too big a stretch to apply the tips. I used a knife to scribe the curve on the face. Chop down about 1/8" (less than half the thickness) and rout out the waste. I used a chisel and a small routing plane. Fitting the tips is all handwork but it's not hard; we're not doing production work here people, one pair of oars should only take an hour or so. Glue in an over sized hunk the plane it down flush. I think I used epoxy but Titebond 3 should work too-I'll probably use it in the future. Lots of varnish.
Rick

I've done a lot of kayak paddles. Ricks method also adds quite a bit more gluing surface by adding the little ornamental point. That added point also adds a little strength by adding a bit of "anchor" to the hardwood.

Adding a design to the end can be accomplished quite easily with a band saw or scroll saw. (I suspect someone skilled with a jig saw might be able to accomplish the same thing.) Before shaping the blade and gluing the tip, overlap the hardwood and the blade. The overlap needs to be as wide, or wider, than the design. You'll need to hot glue or tack the two pieces together and you'll need lots of space because you'll be waving that long oar around your shop as you make the cut. Draw the diagram on the overlap area and cut. You'll get a perfect fit. Just use thickened epoxy and you are good to go. The more intricate you can make the design, the more gluing surface you'll have, and thus, more strength.

I've done a couple of dozen kayak paddles, which means double the amount of tips. I've only had two fail. The first was when I used Titebond and the second is when I used non-thickened epoxy. I love Titebond, but not for water world projects.

John

Woxbox
12-01-2012, 09:36 AM
That is a very nice detail. Even with thickened epoxy, I think it's critical to seal the end grain with a first coat before assembling. Otherwise the grain just sucks all the glue out of the joint.

Ben Fuller
12-01-2012, 09:46 AM
Back in the day of wooden centerboards we used to put in the dado before we shaped the board. Cut the blank to shape, then run it down a table saw; for an oar it would be easiest to do it with a hand saw. Then we used to lay in glass cord or parachute cord, with epoxy then shape. You'd end up with a wicked sharp durable trailing edge.

Another solution is one that comes with the Gougeon G-10 1 to 1 epoxy, using it with filler to make a tip over a 45 degree bevel. I have been doing it with kayak paddles and it seems to be Maine rock proof.

No matter your tip reverse the oar if you are pushing off rocks or the beach, probably the simplest protection.

Brian Palmer
12-01-2012, 10:08 AM
I second gluing the hardwood to the outside of the tip. It will do more to protect the tip and still prevent splitting.

Brian

Nicholas Scheuer
12-01-2012, 11:26 AM
Duck soup here. Bring your blank on over. I have a 2-story, 2-car Garage with a full width driveway. We'll position my 10", 2-hp saw under the window (it's on wheels), then hang the blank vertically from the window overhead and saw a nice lateral slot across the blade end for a spline. A matching tip will be easier.

wizbang 13
12-01-2012, 11:52 AM
just rough cut the groove with a skilsaw.
the worse the carpentry, the more rugged the tip will turn out. that is how epoxy works.
anyone going to actually be shoving off of rocks with those cherry tip showboat oars? me no tink so.

Don S
12-01-2012, 01:53 PM
Thanks to everyone for suggestions, including the suspension-from-the-second-storey-garage-window-over-table-saw method. (sadly Illinois is a bit far to go for this). Future generations searching this topic will have the benefit, as do I, of a bunch of creative ideas. Mainly, I've concluded that I can "git r done" one way or another, and that's it's worth the effort.

Bob Cleek
12-01-2012, 09:09 PM
Why do it at all? You've got the oars made now, right? If I were you, I'd soak the end grain of those tips with as much CPES as they would soak up (probably a surprising amount) and that will make them pretty much bulletproof to begin with. (NOT "thinned epoxy" adhesive, but Smith's Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer). You are basically impregnating the wood with epoxy. Then, varnish 'em up and take care of them.

If you want, cover the tips with some copper roofing flashing. (They used to tack it, but nowdays, I prefer to epoxy it... after roughing the copper faying surface well to help the epoxy hold.) A nice scalloped edge or similar artistic detail is good looking.

Then, with or without the copper, or anything else, just leave them alone. When it comes time to refinish, just sand the tips square and smooth again and revarnish. They'll last forever that way, even if they take a beating between refinishing.

When they are really worn down or seriously damaged... only then worry about scarfing wood onto the tips.

If it ain't broke, don't fix it!

(Those cherry tipped "showboaters" sure are pretty, but that's art for art's sake. I'd hardly call them "sacrificial!")

George Ray
12-01-2012, 09:55 PM
I like to pin the tip of the blades with 3/16" bronze rod (36" tig welding rod) an inch or two from the end. Drilling the 4"-5", 3/16" hole and staying centered is fun-challenging and it is a reliable way to mechanically hold the glue joint together. I finish up with epoxy soaked into the end grain.

Don S
12-01-2012, 10:17 PM
Why do it at all? You've got the oars made now, right? If I were you, I'd soak the end grain of those tips with as much CPES as they would soak up (probably a surprising amount) and that will make them pretty much bulletproof to begin with. (NOT "thinned epoxy" adhesive, but Smith's Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer). You are basically impregnating the wood with epoxy. Then, varnish 'em up and take care of them.

If you want, cover the tips with some copper roofing flashing. (They used to tack it, but nowdays, I prefer to epoxy it... after roughing the copper faying surface well to help the epoxy hold.) A nice scalloped edge or similar artistic detail is good looking.

Then, with or without the copper, or anything else, just leave them alone. When it comes time to refinish, just sand the tips square and smooth again and revarnish. They'll last forever that way, even if they take a beating between refinishing.

When they are really worn down or seriously damaged... only then worry about scarfing wood onto the tips.

If it ain't broke, don't fix it!

(Those cherry tipped "showboaters" sure are pretty, but that's art for art's sake. I'd hardly call them "sacrificial!")

My original thought is for protection. And while there is an attraction and a challenge to nicely fitted tips, they're not the only way to protect it. My last pair of very light oars (from just 2 X stock) I sheathed the tip with fiberglas, and that seems to be pretty sturdy. I don't know if it will fray over time. We'll see.

I was out the other day on my bike passing by this classy new frat house being built on, literally on. the campus golf course. They used copper for gutters, downspouts, bay window roof copings. Needless to say, since after the workmen had left, I checked out the dumpsters but none to be found. |:( An interesting idea though, on the tips, but some 'finesse' to execute well. The CPES, though, seems easy and useful..

Don S
12-01-2012, 10:27 PM
I like to pin the tip of the blades with 3/16" bronze rod (36" tig welding rod) an inch or two from the end. Drilling the 4"-5", 3/16" hole and staying centered is fun-challenging and it is a reliable way to mechanically hold the glue joint together. I finish up with epoxy soaked into the end grain.

If I get your description, your blades are made up of side-by-side glued strips, hence the "joint". My blade is solid, cut from a 1 x 8 and runs as the center lamination all the way to the handles, the looms are them bulked up with 1 x glued on top and bottom of the middle/blade lam. It's flat, with spine, not a spoon or modified spoon, although I did consider building that way. Of course, your's might be flat too, just constructed a different way.

skuthorp
12-02-2012, 05:33 AM
I put Gidgee (a very hard Aussie wood) tips on a pair of nice spruce oars that came used with splintered tips. Similar to #22 but not so classy.

Gerarddm
12-02-2012, 10:58 AM
Wrap the oars ends in packing tape or similar so that you have a receptacle formed, then pour in epoxy for a solid oar tip. Paint. Easily renewable.

Don S
12-02-2012, 12:52 PM
Wrap the oars ends in packing tape or similar so that you have a receptacle formed, then pour in epoxy for a solid oar tip. Paint. Easily renewable.

great technique, especially with all and everything else we've heard about epoxy on the thread!

kbowen
12-31-2012, 12:17 PM
great technique, especially with all and everything else we've heard about epoxy on the thread!

I like a technique that I believe came from Erik Schade for use with greenland- style kayak paddles. The historic ones would have a bit of bone or tusk fitted into the tip for pushing off from bergeys and stuff. This version is to put a saw kerf by hand in the tip of the blade, parallel to the flat before you are done shaping it, and then make it into a cove with a rat-tail file. Tease some f-glass strands out of the edge of a scrap and twist into a rope. Soak with Epoxy and lay the rope in the groove. You can make it very dense by pulling on the free ends of the rope and fastening with masking tape. When it is cured, finish shaping the blade and you can sand it right down to the edge of the FRP reinforcement. From a distance of more than 5' it lookes like a simple wood blade, but has a great deal of strength and abrasion resistance where it counts, and is much lighter than glassing the whole tip. If you want to get crazy, I expect that you could do the same process with kevlar. You will want to make the lower third or more of the blade pretty waterproof by some means so that expansion doesn't bust the thing loose, but can leave the most important grip points bare wood.

K

Don S
12-31-2012, 12:56 PM
The oars were coming along well with a lot of room for creative sculpting, following a plan from #71 WB magazine. Unfortunately I ran into a physical problem -- called intercostal neuralgia (rib cage inflammation) -- which made deep breathing, coughing, sneezing, twisting, etc. very painful. So I'm just now getting back to the shaping in small bites. Very frustrating to have the oars just waiting and me not able.

Anyway the plan called for 2 1/4 X 1 7/8 looms, about 18" below grip, which has been kind of a pain in making the transition to round, which then is transitioned back into oval at the neck. If I did it over, I think I would work from 2 1/4" square as I've seen written up in places. The different methods has confused me no end, but that's pretty much standard for building boats and boat things I think.:confused:

Meanwhile I got a copy of the compendium "Pete Culler on Wooden Boats" which is enjoyable reading. Capt. Pete, in particular, mentions hollowing out the wood on either side of the blade spine which means a pretty flat blade, not the triangle often pictured, since putting a groove along the axis in a 3/4" blade whose final thickness is 3/16 -1/4 doesn't leave much stock for tapering down. I'm not too concerned as long as I think it out well in advance and not wind up with a mess.

Since I'm getting ahead of myself, always -- and this oar thread has been so enlightening -- I think I'll start a separate thread related to glassing the bottom of Pooduck.

Happy New Year all!

JimConlin
12-31-2012, 02:11 PM
I like a technique that I believe came from Erik Schade for use with greenland- style kayak paddles. The historic ones would have a bit of bone or tusk fitted into the tip for pushing off from bergeys and stuff. This version is to put a saw kerf by hand in the tip of the blade, parallel to the flat before you are done shaping it, and then make it into a cove with a rat-tail file. Tease some f-glass strands out of the edge of a scrap and twist into a rope. Soak with Epoxy and lay the rope in the groove. You can make it very dense by pulling on the free ends of the rope and fastening with masking tape. When it is cured, finish shaping the blade and you can sand it right down to the edge of the FRP reinforcement. From a distance of more than 5' it lookes like a simple wood blade, but has a great deal of strength and abrasion resistance where it counts, and is much lighter than glassing the whole tip. If you want to get crazy, I expect that you could do the same process with kevlar. You will want to make the lower third or more of the blade pretty waterproof by some means so that expansion doesn't bust the thing loose, but can leave the most important grip points bare wood.

K

Two other variants on this:

If concerned about the elasticity of such reinforcement, nylon parachute cord will be somewhat more elastic and still pretty tough.

I've strengthened the trailing edges of foils by inletting a 1/8" x 1" strip of G10.

Peerie Maa
12-31-2012, 02:34 PM
The oars were coming along well with a lot of room for creative sculpting, following a plan from #71 WB magazine. Unfortunately I ran into a physical problem -- called intercostal neuralgia (rib cage inflammation) -- which made deep breathing, coughing, sneezing, twisting, etc. very painful. So I'm just now getting back to the shaping in small bites. Very frustrating to have the oars just waiting and me not able.Sorry to read this, I hope that you mend quick


Anyway the plan called for 2 1/4 X 1 7/8 looms, about 18" below grip, which has been kind of a pain in making the transition to round, which then is transitioned back into oval at the neck. If I did it over, I think I would work from 2 1/4" square as I've seen written up in places. The different methods has confused me no end, but that's pretty much standard for building boats and boat things I think.:confused: This is not difficult if you shape the loom to the correct width and "thickness" before rounding off. You then use a spar gauge to mark for 8 square, the gauge will do the tapers so that it comes out round or oval in the right places. Transition from the square looms to the round is achieved by going from nothing off the corners at the "square" part down to the gauge line at the round.


Meanwhile I got a copy of the compendium "Pete Culler on Wooden Boats" which is enjoyable reading. Capt. Pete, in particular, mentions hollowing out the wood on either side of the blade spine which means a pretty flat blade, not the triangle often pictured, since putting a groove along the axis in a 3/4" blade whose final thickness is 3/16 -1/4 doesn't leave much stock for tapering down. I'm not too concerned as long as I think it out well in advance and not wind up with a mess.

Happy New Year all!

Hollowed sections certainly make for a less clunky blade and the oar will balance better as there is no unnecessary weight out at the blade end. However you may need to find a backing out plane or special curved sole spoke shave to do the work.

Don S
12-31-2012, 03:12 PM
Thanks, Nick, for the good thoughts.

I did in fact cut the loom to the correct thickness to account for taper, actually made a new spar gauge to fit nicely, and used it to mark 8 sided. Still, using the gauge, I got a slight oval premarked due to some differences in the sides of the rectangle. but I fudged it down to round, and will work it back to slight oval at the neck. (if I take your description rightly). Part of the problem was working off two different directions based on slightly different designs. Now, beginning to shape the second oar, I am a bit more brave in cutting down the 8 sided section rather than knocking off small corner sections all the way around. I figure if I get the outside flats to correspond to the desired finish dimensions and taper I can reapply the spar gauge and knock off a pretty good chunk of 4 corners, then proceed to rounding.

Have been thinking about the tool(s) for cutting the hollow on the blade. I do have a nice gently rounded sole spoke shave (a smaller radius shave would be better, but it's not what I have). Also a good sized round gouge which I might be able to finesse, maybe in combination with a good rounded riffler type rasp. I had a bowl rounding tool, which I left elsewhere, but I think it would be too broad. No backing out plane, and doubt I will try to make one. As Capt Pete says "take your time here". We'll see how the grain cooperates.

Peerie Maa
12-31-2012, 04:01 PM
Thanks, Nick, for the good thoughts.

I did in fact cut the loom to the correct thickness to account for taper, actually made a new spar gauge to fit nicely, and used it to mark 8 sided. Still, using the gauge, I got a slight oval premarked due to some differences in the sides of the rectangle. but I fudged it down to round, and will work it back to slight oval at the neck. (if I take your description rightly). Part of the problem was working off two different directions based on slightly different designs. Now, beginning to shape the second oar, I am a bit more brave in cutting down the 8 sided section rather than knocking off small corner sections all the way around. I figure if I get the outside flats to correspond to the desired finish dimensions and taper I can reapply the spar gauge and knock off a pretty good chunk of 4 corners, then proceed to rounding.

Have been thinking about the tool(s) for cutting the hollow on the blade. I do have a nice gently rounded sole spoke shave (a smaller radius shave would be better, but it's not what I have). Also a good sized round gouge which I might be able to finesse, maybe in combination with a good rounded riffler type rasp. I had a bowl rounding tool, which I left elsewhere, but I think it would be too broad. No backing out plane, and doubt I will try to make one. As Capt Pete says "take your time here". We'll see how the grain cooperates.

Rather than making a backing out plane just for one set of oars, go with the gouge and then shape a scrap block of wood to the desired radius and use with glass paper. You could even radius one side/edge, blending into the flat for the true shape of the blade.
Backing out planes are not hard to make if you can find an old woody block plane to convert. You can also make a spar plane for the looms as well.

Don S
12-31-2012, 04:33 PM
Rather than making a backing out plane just for one set of oars, go with the gouge and then shape a scrap block of wood to the desired radius and use with glass paper. You could even radius one side/edge, blending into the flat for the true shape of the blade.
Backing out planes are not hard to make if you can find an old woody block plane to convert. You can also make a spar plane for the looms as well.


Ah, excellent idea. The shaped wood block should do a nicer job smoothing out the round bottom channel than the riffler would.

I probably should make a spar rounding plane; mast, yard, boom, etc., are looming, so to speak. Old wood planes aren't that hard to find. Actually I got rid of a few along with, if it can be believed, a bunch of 4 and 6 inch C clamps when I cleaned out my father's basement years ago. But you can't hold onto everything,or know what will seem like a good idea in 20 years time.

Thanks again.

Peerie Maa
12-31-2012, 04:47 PM
Ah, excellent idea. The shaped wood block should do a nicer job smoothing out the round bottom channel than the riffler would.

I probably should make a spar rounding plane; mast, yard, boom, etc., are looming, so to speak. Old wood planes aren't that hard to find. Actually I got rid of a few along with, if it can be believed, a bunch of 4 and 6 inch C clamps when I cleaned out my father's basement years ago. But you can't hold onto everything,or know what will seem like a good idea in 20 years time.

Thanks again.
Here you go :D
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?144707-Shaping-plane-for-rounding-a-spar

Don S
12-31-2012, 05:00 PM
Here you go :D
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?144707-Shaping-plane-for-rounding-a-spar

Uh, oh. Getting harder to find excuses.;)

Ben Fuller
12-31-2012, 05:09 PM
On the hollowing side, while I do have a little backing out plane that I made from an old wood plane I found a cabinet scraper to be pretty effective. John Gardner showed me the trick of filing a scraper to a 45 degree then putting on the burr if you want to move more wood. I love scrapers.

Don S
12-31-2012, 05:47 PM
On the hollowing side, while I do have a little backing out plane that I made from an old wood plane I found a cabinet scraper to be pretty effective. John Gardner showed me the trick of filing a scraper to a 45 degree then putting on the burr if you want to move more wood. I love scrapers.

I've only started to fool with scrapers which, I think, has been an extension from gaining more appreciation for other edge tools doing more than roughing out work. Not real expensive ones but I've rescued a couple of nice planes and some large 'paring' chisels from junque stores and the like; and learning to sharpen and substituting a hock blade or two where they'd fit; make longer chisel handles. So I think I'm destined to investigate scrapers a bit more ;-)