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View Full Version : Small Boats 2013 in the HOWSE!



callsign222
11-11-2012, 08:54 PM
Oh yeah, I'm reading it right now. Not waiting. Slobberslobberdrooldrool

Discuss.

BBSebens
11-11-2012, 10:51 PM
Shouldn't that be "In The Hawse"?

A real annual favorite.

callsign222
11-13-2012, 06:17 PM
Well, since conversation is sparse I will add some thoughts.

I am of the opinion that the cover is cheaply done, the "montage" is a break from tradition, though I expect getting 4-5 boats together at the same time on a nice day in Brooklin is a logistical nightmare, so I completely understand, but I reserve the right to lightly grouse.

There is a nice selection of boats inside, from easy to build to "I will never build that" to something in between. I like that mix, since it shows boats to buy AND build, but not necessarily both. I have every issue but the elusive 2008 issue, and I find that they age like a fine wine, revisiting these magazines in future years always pays in double dividends, and that delicate balance of boats rings true, every year. As my interests fluctuate, I can always find an example somewhere in a Small Boats issue.

This year, the Phoenix III is profiled which is a major stoke factor for me since my Maine Island Trail camping/adventuring partner built and sails a flawless example of this salty little lapstrake boat. Now all we need is a Goat some year. I will volunteer my stories and writing services for a Goat Island Skiff profile in the future.

Keep up the good work, WB.

John How
11-13-2012, 08:11 PM
I notice that Flames McMullen has an essay in this issue. I haven't received mine yet but look forward to it.

TomF
11-13-2012, 09:17 PM
Damn. Looked for it on the newsstand tonight, but it isn't here yet.

It's my favourite issue - I've got 2 back-issues on my nightstand as it is.

CWSmith
11-25-2012, 09:19 PM
I hate to say it, but I'm a little disappointed as well. One thing did catch my eye - that small boat transom on page 24. It's called "Candy Dancer". What is it? It looks light weight, but large enough to carry a big guy like me and probably capable of riding the waves along the northeast coast. Does anyone recognize the design?

orbb
11-25-2012, 10:25 PM
I liked the downsized, 14 foot catboat done in strip plank. From the article, it doesn't look like a set of idiot-proof plans are forthcoming. Shame - that boat really caught my eye.

andykane
11-25-2012, 11:03 PM
I marked the 27th of November in my calendar since according to Woodenboat.com that is the release date but I found it for sale on Friday. The cover image is definitely a bit amateur compared to previous editions but the content as good as ever (if not better than last year). As time goes on and more of the more common/popular small boats get profiled it's interested to see what new stuff pops up. I was impressed at the variety of boats profiled and quite liked the cruising ground information. I would definitely be interested in reading more about areas outside the US (NZ definitely looks appealing) but it's definitely understandable that they'd concentrate on areas most relevant to subscribers (I assume the majority of readers are in the US).

skuthorp
11-26-2012, 06:10 PM
Won't get mine till mid december.

Yeadon
12-01-2012, 01:04 AM
I bought a copy the other day. Love the water trails concept. Also, if you look closely, Big Food made a photo in the magazine. She's in there!

For some reason, I really love Harry Bryan's Rambler 18. I cannot explain it.

Woxbox
12-01-2012, 10:05 AM
Does that stand-up paddle board thing stick out like a sore thumb in this magazine to anyone else? I seriously like kayaks, but what's with those things?

I liked the best places feature, too. Hope that becomes a regular item.

Yeadon
12-01-2012, 10:21 AM
Is a paddleboard a boat? A small craft? What about a surfboard? Windsurfing? Kite surfing?

I think so. They'll get you on the water in a very specific way.

Oldad
12-01-2012, 11:42 AM
Does that stand-up paddle board thing stick out like a sore thumb in this magazine to anyone else? I seriously like kayaks, but what's with those things?

I liked the best places feature, too. Hope that becomes a regular item.

Last summer we passed a fellow on a paddle board as we were leaving he inner bay, slowed down and asked him if he ever wished he could sit down, "All the time, was his answer

Ben Fuller
12-01-2012, 12:08 PM
Any one want more detailed dope on the Maine Island Trail, holler or PM. Might even be able to find a boat for people from away..... which brings me to a whole nother area. If I wanted to camp cruise say in the Pacific Northwest and did not want to put 6000 miles on the trailer how would that happen?

andykane
12-01-2012, 12:13 PM
When I first saw them I thought they were ridiculous but I've come to appreciate what they offer. I've never used one, but if so many people are getting out on the water and closer to nature so simply and inexpensively and getting fit doing it then I'm all for that. I definitely think I'd still prefer a canoe or kayak, but I'm all for people having choices and if they choose a SUP and use it sensibly and safely then I'm fully supportive. I found the small boats article fit in just fine. In a magazine all about easy and simple ways to get on the water is there really any simpler way? (granted a canoe is probably just as easy and a whole lot more versatile, but 1 SUP in the what, 100 boats featured in small boats magazines so far is totally fine by me).

TR
12-01-2012, 01:45 PM
One thing did catch my eye - that small boat transom on page 24. It's called "Candy Dancer". What is it? It looks light weight, but large enough to carry a big guy like me and probably capable of riding the waves along the northeast coast. Does anyone recognize the design?

It's called Gandy Dancer, slang term for railroad track builders. The design is Reuel Parker's Dory 12, plans from him.

photocurio
12-01-2012, 05:06 PM
Is this about an article in the WoodenBoat? Which issue?

Woxbox
12-01-2012, 05:09 PM
The current "Small Boats" 2013 annual edition. Out a couple of weeks now. Available at fine bookstores everywhere. (OK, I tried two Barnes & Nobles before I found a copy.)

Old Dryfoot
12-01-2012, 06:23 PM
This is good news, I had thought I'd missed it over the summer. It would be nice to have the option to include it with one's WB subscription.

CWSmith
12-01-2012, 09:19 PM
Thanks, TR. You have a good eye. I'm still looking for a good size boat for recreational rowing along the coast. If it's long enough, that design may Thanks again.

Ben Fuller
12-02-2012, 07:41 AM
Being of the Portsmouth Maine persuasion, you might hunt up the Piscataqua River wherry from which boats like the Monument River wherry have descended. The slipperiest of the Swampscott style I think, although there is one really light gunning dory that I'd like to see built.

Paul Pless
12-02-2012, 09:41 AM
For some reason, I really love Harry Bryan's Rambler 18. I cannot explain it.you're just saying that to make mcmullen's head explode. . .

Yeadon
12-02-2012, 11:12 AM
It just looks so useful.

James McMullen
12-02-2012, 11:31 AM
No, no, the Rambler would make a fine little crabbing and fishing platform. Not a substitute for a real boat, mind you.

Ben Fuller
12-02-2012, 12:39 PM
The Rambler is kind of a civilian version of my favorite useful boat, a LCVP.

stromborg
12-02-2012, 01:48 PM
My favorite has got to be the Elson Perry on page 102.

Though finding a picture of my boat under construction (the Clint Chase Boat Builder ad on page 110) was pretty cool. I was up at the Northwest Maritime Center buying some copper nails and had to run back into the shop to show the 3 guys working in there I really wasn't just another looky-loo/gadfly. Side note: There is a beautiful 1930-something spitsgatter getting recaulked and an Eun Mara well under way up there right now, worth a visit.

Steve

WI-Tom
12-02-2012, 02:16 PM
Any one want more detailed dope on the Maine Island Trail, holler or PM. Might even be able to find a boat for people from away..... which brings me to a whole nother area. If I wanted to camp cruise say in the Pacific Northwest and did not want to put 6000 miles on the trailer how would that happen?

Ben,

of course if you're heading to the PNW, then the Great Lakes are right on your way. And in the Great Lakes I could probably manage to wrangle up a boat to use for someone who seems competent. (Somehow I get the feeling you'd pass my test...)

I may take you up on asking for some Maine information in the next year or so.

Tom

CWSmith
12-04-2012, 08:26 PM
Being of the Portsmouth Maine persuasion, you might hunt up the Piscataqua River wherry from which boats like the Monument River wherry have descended. The slipperiest of the Swampscott style I think, although there is one really light gunning dory that I'd like to see built.

I see from a google search that the Piscataqua River wherry is one of the designs you "lust after". You have good taste. There may be plans at Mystic. Any other leads? Thanks for the idea.

Ben Fuller
12-04-2012, 08:32 PM
Mystic does have plans and a number of serious rowers have adapted same to maybe a little lighter construction. John Aborn and Monument River Wherry comes to mind. He did pretty well in Blackburns with it. The PRW that I used to row had the seats adjusted a little for balance. I'd need to measure things, but we had a pair of seats in it for doubles then put in a removable seat aft of the forward seat for single rowing.

James McMullen
12-04-2012, 09:09 PM
Any one want more detailed dope on the Maine Island Trail, holler or PM. Might even be able to find a boat for people from away..... which brings me to a whole nother area. If I wanted to camp cruise say in the Pacific Northwest and did not want to put 6000 miles on the trailer how would that happen?


My dear Mr. Fuller, perhaps some things could be arranged. . .for example, Tim currently has both Big Food and Dragonfly in his driveway, and he can't sail them both at the same time. There's certainly plenty of other boats that are underutilized for camp-cruising around here too, like a few of the Hvalsoes at the CWB. Give us a little lead time and we'll make some inquiries.

Peter Gottlund
12-05-2012, 08:03 AM
Ben, perhaps this topic needs its own thread, but anyway.... I've been wondering myself about how to get my boat to some far away places like PNW, Bahamas, Nova Scotia, etc.
With proper cradles, stacking and care, how many boats could we get into a shipping container? What might it cost to cross the country? SRR's all,over the place!

Woxbox
12-05-2012, 09:34 AM
Another option is moving companies. If it's a lighter sail & oar (or paddle) craft, you pack all of your gear inside and strap a cover over it, and most moving companies will treat it like a big piece of furniture and deliver it wherever you want. You'd probably need a boatyard at the destination to take delivery for you and put it in the water.

switters
12-05-2012, 04:00 PM
Love Portland, got my copy at the airport newsstand.

Ben Fuller
12-05-2012, 07:11 PM
Ben, perhaps this topic needs its own thread, but anyway.... I've been wondering myself about how to get my boat to some far away places like PNW, Bahamas, Nova Scotia, etc.
With proper cradles, stacking and care, how many boats could we get into a shipping container? What might it cost to cross the country? SRR's all,over the place!

Probably does need a separate thread. I have some experience shipping container loads of decked sailing canoes to regattas as far away as down under, very event focussed and a goodly amount of lead time as well as thinking about packing.

What interests me is setting up some kind of system maybe like house swapping in vacation areas, or small scale chartering mostly for insurance issues.

Appreciate the various offers; I need to quit the day job. This years possibilities already are the Everglades challenge, taking the Vernon south to Mystic, to Nova Scotia, doing an end for end under paddle for the Maine Island Trail and of course the Small Reach regatta.

Peter Gottlund
12-05-2012, 07:33 PM
Woxbox, I like your idea. A few boats could be timed for delivery to coincide with owners arrival. WBF Van Lines!
Ben, I would swap boats, but I am a couple of hours from boating. You need equally matched swapees!
Please move this to an appropriate post if necessary.

Hunky Dory
12-06-2012, 01:45 AM
My favorite has got to be the Elson Perry on page 102.

Though finding a picture of my boat under construction (the Clint Chase Boat Builder ad on page 110) was pretty cool. I was up at the Northwest Maritime Center buying some copper nails and had to run back into the shop to show the 3 guys working in there I really wasn't just another looky-loo/gadfly. Side note: There is a beautiful 1930-something spitsgatter getting recaulked and an Eun Mara well under way up there right now, worth a visit.

Steve

I Like the Rambler too but would never be able to sell my wife on an 8 knot powerboat, she thinks her 30 hp.dory skiff is underpowered. She has expressed interest in the stand up paddle boards but i'm not building her one till she tries one out. Steve I noticed you new boat right away but it looks naked after seeing it done.
The Elson Perry is nice but doesn't sound like an easy single handed boat.
I was happy to see my Flapjack skiff in the Wooden Boat Show add.

Mad Scientist
12-06-2012, 07:16 PM
...The Elson Perry is nice but doesn't sound like an easy single handed boat...

The Elson Perry might rival Nelson Zimmer's 18'8" Mackinaw Boat for the coveted title of 'world champion ofr number of feet of line per foot of boat'. That was a comment by Doug Hylan in Small Boats 2008, about the Mackinaw Boat.
But, it looks ideal for its intended role of small-boat sail training.
She happens to be in this picture I took a few years ago, along with that damned hawser:mad:
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8067/8251365060_d59d7a0d26.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/tommy61/8251365060/)

The hawser is the waterfront equivalent of those evil telephone poles and trees that are invisible thru the viewfinder but show up plainly in the photo!

Tom