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John Smith
10-16-2012, 06:16 AM
Anyone here remember how the first Bush used the media in the first Gulf War when he had this group of ships amassing as a decoy. Was that an acceptable lie?

I'm making some very broad assumptions here just for the sake of the question. If our embassy is hit by an organized attack of Al Qaeda or similar and we believe we have a better chance of catching the appropriate people if they think we think it was a riot of the public, is it okay to put out the false story?

We see this type of thing from time to time on tv shows where a statement is given to the press designed to flush the bad guy out. Is it proper?

I am not saying this is what happened, but it looms as a possibility.

We need to wait until we have more facts before drawing conclusions: look at Martin/Zimmerman

skuthorp
10-16-2012, 06:23 AM
Like when the headline, designed to sell the story, has virtually nothing to do with the actual content?.
Been going on for years, after all selling the advertising medium is more important than any truth.

Ian McColgin
10-16-2012, 06:29 AM
Truth is so precious she must be protected by a bodyguard of lies. Of course legerdemain and misdirection are important tactics in almost all forms of human conflict, from poker to romance to war to commerce to peace. However, there are times when secrecy, like almost all wartime secrecy, is really a cover to keep us from knowing our blunders rather than to keep the enemy from knowing how smart we are. And there are times when secrecy becomes a cover for an ex post facto cover up. In this case, I see no reason to not take things at face value: Our top administration officials too quickly bought the view that it was a spontaneous riot. After all Cairo and Benghazi are actually near each other, like cities in Texas and even Reuters didn't cotton to organized attack or at least well trained folk taking advantage of an opportunity for a week or so. The good news is that unlike all too many in the political world, they have admitted that they were wrong.

Paul Pless
10-16-2012, 07:21 AM
when a lie might be good

when the question is


Do these pants make my butt look big?

Kevin T
10-16-2012, 07:26 AM
when the question is

"Do these pants make my butt look big?"

I'd add to that regarding any question that starts out with these five little words: "what do you think about. . .
:rolleyes:
Disclaimer: Just kidding honey, if you happen to be reading this now or at any time in the future.

Phillip Allen
10-16-2012, 09:59 AM
I rarely take the media at face value and also don't take political talk at face value... not so, many here in the bilge

Phillip Allen
10-16-2012, 10:00 AM
"Do these pants make my butt look big?"

I'd add to that regarding any question that starts out with these five little words: "what do you think about. . .
:rolleyes:
Disclaimer: Just kidding honey, if you happen to be reading this now or at any time in the future.

this is one of those places where 'just kidding' will do you no good at all :)

John Smith
10-16-2012, 10:13 AM
All of this is a nice dodge, and I agree truth in advertising and politics would be nice, but I'm talking/asking outside that framework.

In WWII deceit was part of fighting the war. Was stretching the truth a good thing then? Immediately coming to mind is the fake spy we had the Germans find.

Today we have a different world. Do the ends ever justify the means?

This is a pretty specific question that has nothing to do with advertising. If it helps us catch the people who attack us is it a bad thing to put out a press release with false information?

Case by case? Never? If the bad guys let their guard down because they don't think we're looking for them, was it worth the false information?

That's not quite the same category as getting unemployment numbers correct or saying you didn't say something you did say for political reasons.