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View Full Version : Halliburtonís Lost Rod Found



Ian McColgin
10-09-2012, 07:11 PM
10.09.12 - 4:06 PM
by Abby Zimet, Common Dreams

Good news, nation: After an almost-month-long search by the National Guard, local police and health officials, an oilfield worker found a radioactive rod that the ever-reliable Hallliburton had lost on a 130-mile trip between fracking sites in the Texas desert. The worker found the seven-inch rod, which contains* americium-241/beryllium - a potential ingredient in a dirty bomb and termed a "category 3" source of radiation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) - lying along the highway near Pecos. The FBI determined that there was "no criminal activity" involved with the loss. We feel so much better.

ďApparently we take our nuclear waste, throw it in the back of a pick-up truck and drive around until the wind blows it away or it falls off on the side of the road...We don't need terrorism - we have Halliburton." - Gordon Duff, senior editor of Veterans Today.

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LeeG
10-09-2012, 07:49 PM
Stuff happens

Peter Malcolm Jardine
10-09-2012, 07:50 PM
You just can't make this shiit up.

Kevin T
10-09-2012, 08:50 PM
I love that the FBI said that there was no criminal activity involved, sad that they didn't mention the criminal STUPIDITY that was involved.

Paul Pless
10-09-2012, 08:53 PM
What does a fracking crew need radioactive material for?

ccmanuals
10-09-2012, 08:53 PM
was wondering the same thing

Glen Longino
10-09-2012, 09:04 PM
Lucky it was Pecos and not Houston.
Houston is full of people.
Only four people around Pecos in 400 years!;)

Waddie
10-09-2012, 10:32 PM
That's just one incident we heard about..... How much sh*t happens all over that never sees the light of day? Of course, it being Halliburton and all makes it so much worse.....

regards,
Waddie

BrianW
10-09-2012, 10:53 PM
What does a fracking crew need radioactive material for?

I recall when working on the North Slope that radioactive material was added to the drill string, down near the bit, and sensors positioned elsewhere could triangulate it's exact position. It's one way of knowing exactly where the bit is, when going directional.

BrianW
10-09-2012, 10:55 PM
Of course, it being Halliburton and all makes it so much worse.....

regards,
Waddie

Not really.

jsjpd1
10-09-2012, 10:58 PM
That's interesting Brian. At least they had reason for driving around with it in the back of the pickup.

PeterSibley
10-09-2012, 10:58 PM
I recall when working on the North Slope that radioactive material was added to the drill string, down near the bit, and sensors positioned elsewhere could triangulate it's exact position. It's one way of knowing exactly where the bit is, when going directional.

It also improves any drinking water it gets into .... well maybe not.:D:(

BrianW
10-09-2012, 11:03 PM
It doesn't stay down there. It gets tripped out with the rest of the pipe.

PeterSibley
10-10-2012, 12:24 AM
It doesn't stay down there. It gets tripped out with the rest of the pipe.

So it's always inside a pipe, not in the drill slurry ?

BrianW
10-10-2012, 12:55 AM
Correct.

Check out this Schlumberger page...

http://www.slb.com/services/completions/perforating/tubing_conveyed_perforating/accessories/radioactive_marker_sub.aspx

BrianW
10-10-2012, 12:58 AM
The slurry is referred to as 'mud' around here.

hokiefan
10-10-2012, 01:32 AM
Radioactive stuff is used in many industries everyday. We use nuclear level transmitters in several applications, works great for hot, sticky, gooey stuff under vacuum. The radioactive source shines the beam through the vessel, no penetrations necessary. A receiver on the other side reads the beam, material in the vessel absorbs the radiation changing the strength of the beam depending on how much stuff is in the tank. You can use similar technology to get a picture of whats going on inside a distillation column. Its all a bit spendy, but sometimes its the best approach.

All of this stuff can potentially be used for something dastardly, but that doesn't it would be easy to accomplish.

Cheers,

Bobby

Bob Adams
10-10-2012, 04:49 AM
BTW, Americium 241 is in most US homes...in the smoke detector.

DanSkorupka
10-10-2012, 04:28 PM
If there is really enough in there for an effective dirty bomb these things be in a locked clearly labeled metal box transported in something more secure than a pickup bed with three or more officers (and I mean real police with both guns and tazers not rent-a-cops with pepper spray and a stick) with prior experience in highway patrol and police escorts with it through the entire journey with their dash cam on non stop from before departure to after arrival.

They aren't terrorists for this alone (overall is a whole other bucket of snakes many of them acid-addled cobras) but I would call this a textbook perfect example of criminally negligent endangerment.
Free some potheads to make room and toss whoever's brilliant idea this was in with the mother stabbers, father rapers, and other mean/nasty/ugly/horrible things and send the key away with the radwaste. The "leaders" who want to see blood and gore and guts and veins and things in their teeth can join him.

BTW, how many people here have heard the whole studio version of Alice's Restaurant?

BrianW
10-10-2012, 07:13 PM
If there is really enough in there for an effective dirty bomb,...

That's a big "if".


...but I would call this a textbook perfect example of criminally negligent endangerment.

Based on your "if" assumption?

Vince Brennan
10-10-2012, 07:26 PM
And nothing against Brian's post which raises an eyebrow at Dan's rather florid use of terminology, but:

While we have nothing to show either way if the "keepers of the rod" were merely stupid and careless OR "criminally Negligent", the automatic gainsaying of the severity of the incident is somewhat worrying coming from someone who should be more than familiar with the concept of "Threat Assessments".

One does not necessarily react based on the ACTUALITY of the threat, but on the POSSIBILITY of the threat. It may be a bit paranoid, but just because....(etc.)

In certain disciplines, NOT acting on the possible threat can quite easily have you in a body-bag.

Let Halli-screw-up show it was not a danger to all and sundry and we can than take the "criminally negligent" terminology off the table. Until then, it's just another in a long line of Cheny-esque incidents in which the welfare of the common citizen is far less important that the corporate profits of an already-proven-to-be-criminal multinational.

"A big if"? Not given the last fifteen years.

Phillip Allen
10-10-2012, 07:29 PM
What does a fracking crew need radioactive material for?

I suggest it is used to measure the extent of fracking or the density of the substrait... just like an X ray machine

BrianW
10-10-2012, 07:32 PM
Well sir, the FBI was right there. I don't think they were just rummaging through trash cans. They may have considered the criminal neglect aspect.

Phillip Allen
10-10-2012, 07:35 PM
Vince, if possibility is all that's needed to act then anyone with a smoke detector is a risk and certainly factory shipments to distribution centers!

Paul Pless
10-10-2012, 07:41 PM
google the radioactive boy scout. . .

PhaseLockedLoop
10-10-2012, 08:17 PM
BTW, Americium 241 is in most US homes...in the smoke detector.

Yeah, yeah. The FBI doesn't show up at everybody's home, though, do they?

Joe Dupere
10-10-2012, 08:50 PM
BTW, how many people here have heard the whole studio version of Alice's Restaurant?

Alice doesn't live in the restaraunt, she lives in a church near by the restaurant, in the bell tower with her husband Ray and Fasha the dog. And livin' in the bell tower like that, they got a lot of room downstairs room where the pews used to be. And havin' all that room, seein' as how they took out all the pews, they decided that they didn't have to take out their garbage for a long time.

I used to know the whole song by heart. Now I can still sing along with most of it...

Ross M
10-10-2012, 09:54 PM
google the radioactive boy scout. . .

I read that article when originally published in Harper's. I remain astounded.

Ron Williamson
10-11-2012, 06:32 AM
I recall when working on the North Slope that radioactive material was added to the drill string, down near the bit, and sensors positioned elsewhere could triangulate it's exact position. It's one way of knowing exactly where the bit is, when going directional.

I would have suspected that this property would make the lost rod much easier to find.
R

Phillip Allen
10-11-2012, 07:28 AM
I would have suspected that this property would make the lost rod much easier to find.
R

wouldn't it be in a shielded container?

Concordia 33
10-11-2012, 08:28 AM
10.09.12 - 4:06 PM
by Abby Zimet, Common Dreams

Good news, nation: After an almost-month-long search by the National Guard, local police and health officials, an oilfield worker found a radioactive rod that the ever-reliable Hallliburton had lost on a 130-mile trip between fracking sites in the Texas desert. The worker found the seven-inch rod, which contains* americium-241/beryllium - a potential ingredient in a dirty bomb and termed a "category 3" source of radiation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) - lying along the highway near Pecos. The FBI determined that there was "no criminal activity" involved with the loss. We feel so much better.

“Apparently we take our nuclear waste, throw it in the back of a pick-up truck and drive around until the wind blows it away or it falls off on the side of the road...We don't need terrorism - we have Halliburton." - Gordon Duff, senior editor of Veterans Today.

# # #

This has been my largest complaint of the civilian and military nuclear industry. There is no true disposal of nuclear waste. It is contained somewhere until we figure out a good way to dispose of it. Since very few places want this stuff sitting around, legal sites are few and far between thus requiring excessive transportation which is one more place for the system to fail.