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Petertheking
08-17-2012, 03:33 PM
Hello All
After restoring a few fiberglass boats i have decided to take the plunge and restore a classic victory class keel boat (circa 1935). Clinker with elm planking and frames, 20.9ft loa, 5.10ft beam, 2.6ft draft, 240sqft jib and main. After reading through a few of the posts you all seem a friendly bunch and i figured you might like to hear the process (and offer advice!).

She has been ashore for about 4 years, the previous owner has installed new keel bolts and secured the laps on the bow.
My plan is to:-
move it to a boat yard,
build a tent around it,
strip all paint work,
replace any rotted / dodgy frames and planks,
make new blocks for bow and stern end of keel
secure rear planks to transom,
install new rudder tube and rudder,
add new rubbing rail
add goop to bow and stern,
sink for few weeks and check for leaks,
dry out,
fix leaks (tighten / replace rivets),
paint,
attach hardware,
get mast and sails,
go sailing!

So the main thing i am unsure of at the moment is if i have the order of restoration right, like do you add goop after the wood has been in the water and swollen or before? and should it be natural wood or painted before testing for sinking for few weeks?? i have added a few photos below of the boat and areas of concern....http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/s720x720/542521_10151175392708980_1728275291_n.jpghttp://a2.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/s720x720/422505_10151175392573980_844760515_n.jpghttp://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/s720x720/579865_10151175391548980_201453474_n.jpghttp://a2.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/s720x720/264838_10151175391658980_1827085518_n.jpghttp://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/s720x720/418381_10151175392343980_603896964_n.jpghttp://a6.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/s720x720/582772_10151175392473980_1954196502_n.jpg
Anway thanks for looking and any advice you can give, will promise to add more photos as progress is made!
Peter

Petertheking
08-17-2012, 03:35 PM
some photos of the keel
http://a1.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/s720x720/378288_10151175391988980_1566269711_n.jpghttp://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/s720x720/195977_10151175392063980_1325498586_n.jpghttp://a5.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/s720x720/431046_10151175392153980_880281620_n.jpghttp://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/s720x720/551097_10151175392253980_53800834_n.jpg
cheers

ahp
08-17-2012, 04:14 PM
Wow, have you got courage!

This is of no help to you you at all, but there was another Victory class, a raised deck sloop about 30 feet LOA. About 20 of these were built near Long Island Sound in 1919 to 1920. Where are you?

John Meachen
08-17-2012, 04:48 PM
I would guess that the boat is in the Portsmouth area and I would echo the remark about courage.

Crazer
08-17-2012, 10:18 PM
You'll need a lot of patience, yes, but it will be worth it in the end. That's a very pretty boat. All I can say is ask a lot of questions. Never take the easy way out as that's how boats end up in these situations in the first place. Take your time, do it right and be sure to keep us updated.

Petertheking
08-18-2012, 10:56 AM
thanks for your encouragement, i think i need it! it is located in portsmouth uk, my aim is to enter cowes week in 2 years time! so before xmas strip all paintwork, after replace wood and any others bits, next summer paint, then next winter sort out the hardware, mast sails and rigging. not to much! cheers peter

Larks
08-18-2012, 08:24 PM
Welcome to the forum Peter.

What do you mean by "goop"? Are you talking epoxy, a mastic, traditional caulking methods, a combination of both? If you haven't already, I'd read up on up the various caulking methods, there are quite a few good books on the subject as well as discussions here on the forum.

On my 28' strip planked hull, I've used cotton caulking in my Garboard with Fixtech FixSeal MSP190 over that, in lieu of traditional putty. There are similar modern compounds that will suit but I steered away from Sikaflex because it seems to harden more quickly than the likes of the Fixtech product, and fall out of the seams. No matter what you use though, you will need to prep' the seams well before use in line with the product spec's. In my case it was a very very very good clean, Fixtech primer or Everdure (I used Everdure) along the seam edges then the cotton and MSP190.

Others may have different advise for this type of hull in regard to the seam caulking, but for what it's worth I soaked my keel and lower part of the hull (in a bath) before caulking them to close them up to close to what they'd be when in the drink and have kept them moist after caulking while I finish the rest of the restoration. This suited me better in the sequence of what I'm doing, though you may find it more beneficial to leave the caulking until just before you launch. One of those things that you just need to work out yourself in order of the work you have to do, where you can keep her, how well you can keep her moist and so on. ie how long after caulking will you launch? And if it's a year or so can you keep the area moist to maintain what you've done?

Duncan Gibbs
08-18-2012, 10:39 PM
Good on you and go for it Peter!

Make sure you stay in touch with these guys as well: http://victoryclass.org.uk/

They may have a fair bit of historical info as well as measuring requirements that need to be followed.

I'm looking forward to seeing you progress. I need as much inspiration as possible for my own resto!

chuckt
08-19-2012, 06:51 AM
Cool boat. Best of luck.

Petertheking
08-19-2012, 06:54 AM
i have been on the victory website and downlaoded the class handbook and sent them an email. the class is quite strict on what you can and cant do on the boats, but fortunately the hand book is very comprehensive (even states what types of wood and fittings to us which is handy).
the 'goop' is a bit of a question mark at the mooment. its clinker (lapstrake) so none needed on the planks (but may have to tighten a few rivets), its where the planks join the stem and transom where i will need some but thats a few months away yet! exaclty what point to sink it is some thing i am also unsure of, was thinking of after i replaced any rotten wood and sealed the bow and transom, but painting it after its soaked in the water and the wood has swollen up
(but how dry should i let it get again before painting?). anyway thanks again.

Peerie Maa
08-19-2012, 07:05 AM
i have been on the victory website and downlaoded the class handbook and sent them an email. the class is quite strict on what you can and cant do on the boats, but fortunately the hand book is very comprehensive (even states what types of wood and fittings to us which is handy).
the 'goop' is a bit of a question mark at the mooment. its clinker (lapstrake) so none needed on the planks (but may have to tighten a few rivets), its where the planks join the stem and transom where i will need some but thats a few months away yet! exaclty what point to sink it is some thing i am also unsure of, was thinking of after i replaced any rotten wood and sealed the bow and transom, but painting it after its soaked in the water and the wood has swollen up
(but how dry should i let it get again before painting?). anyway thanks again.
Please give up the concept of goop when discussing boat building. Boats require strong mechanical fastenings to stop them working and thereby make them work. Goop = shortcut = worse problems in the near future. Whilst it was common practice to sink clinker work boats it is not good practice to sink a ballasted keel boat. Make as good a job as you can on fitting everything back together. Paint her and then see if the yard will allow her to hang in the slings whilst you see whether she is leaking. Then decide whether a portable salvage pump is required to keep her afloat whilst she takes up.
As you are launching into salt water you can knife household soap into any gappy seams. It will squeeze out as she takes up but will not dissolve in salt water.

Larks
08-19-2012, 07:17 AM
the 'goop' is a bit of a question mark at the mooment. its clinker (lapstrake) so none needed on the planks (but may have to tighten a few rivets), its where the planks join the stem and transom where i will need some but thats a few months away yet! exaclty what point to sink it is some thing i am also unsure of, was thinking of after i replaced any rotten wood and sealed the bow and transom, but painting it after its soaked in the water and the wood has swollen up
(but how dry should i let it get again before painting?). anyway thanks again.

When you recaulk the bow you'll more than likely also need to recaulk the whole garboard seam, so in terms of "goop" do start reading up on caulking and choose which option best suits you. The reason I chose a modern sealant over traditional putty, was because it was recommended by Larry Pardy in his book and because my boat isn't really a traditionally built hull, being glued strip plank.

A lot of these decisions are really going to hinge on what you find when you get it cleaned up and get some paint off and see what you have in the way of rot and so on. That stern area does look very dodgy but hopefully someone will be along who knows a bit more about sealing the clinker plank joint around the transom to help you make some decisions there.

Duncan Gibbs
08-19-2012, 07:43 AM
I would assume on a boat like this putty and red lead would be used to bed the hood ends of the planks whilst cotton caulking would be driven into the seams between the plank ends/garboard and the rabbet.

If your boat is C 1935 it's an original so I'd be paying very careful attention to to how these boats were built to begin with as it would be part of the original Bembridge fleet. Restoration is the key word here.

Interestingly I cannot find out who designed class. Do the Redwings share a common architect?

Petertheking
08-19-2012, 03:17 PM
Hello. So definitely more research needed on what to do about the planks ends (was hoping for a quick answer but I had a feeling this might take a bit of advice and research), seems that im going to have to get it stripped then have a pro have a look (fortunately the chap who used to build the victory's still works in Portsmouth and should be able to let me know how they where originally sealed on the plank ends). Had a look at one today that had been completely renovated by another local guy and it felt like squishy stuff between the planks and transom (but thats not to say its right) but he had left before i had a chance to ask him what he used. Apparently he replaced about 70% of the wood and is now on the market for 7000.

I work at a boatyard so getting hoist time will not be a problem, handy tip about the soap.

The Bembridge one design fleet where a different design which the victory's where based on, being adapted by Alfred Westmacott. the chap who gave me mine said it was number 7 and the next oldest afloat was number 6, and it still wins races!

cheers, PK