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neilm
08-09-2012, 06:49 PM
Would it be possible to make one of these from wood? If so, what kind of wood is best? Would it hold up to use?

http://www.austinkayak.com/images/productShots/large/269.jpg

http://www.bartonmarine.com/images/featured-products/featured-k-clam-cleats.jpg

cybuilder
08-09-2012, 07:33 PM
Anything is possible, but good old-fashion wooden jam cleats (the lopsided horn-cleat variety) would be way, way easier to make. Google "wood jam cleat" and you will find lots of info including instructions. If you really want to replicate the more complex plastic varieties in wood (how ironic is that), you have some very fine, intricate millwork ahead of you. A winter Dremel project? Choose a strong hardwood with uniform density (e.g., black locust, oak, etc). Consider buying the plastic versions to use as patterns, although you might beef up wall thickness a bit on the upright clam-cleats. Look for cam-cleats you can take apart so you can cannibalize the internal metal parts (springs, etc). Good luck, Neil.

Arizona Bay
08-09-2012, 07:37 PM
I've made a different style of jam cleat, it works very well. I used a piece of black locust from a tree on the property. Probably any dense hard wood would do.

Mike (who is on the forum) makes the same kind.
http://www.woodenboatfittings.com.au/cleats.htm

JimConlin
08-09-2012, 09:19 PM
I think that those deigns demand stronger and more wear resistant materials than any wood I know.
There are cam cleats in tufnol (linen-phenolic composite) that might meet your needs.
https://encrypted-tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTx7TDqDsvBad_IYhlR__huAhDJmtVry GEjn-rLQhoXe_iBVQs9

They're in the Davey catalog (http://rwrope.com/pdf/davey/davey_2011_catalog.pdf).

Available from R&W Rope.
I've forgotten who was the Davey distributor in PNW.

Thorne
08-09-2012, 09:31 PM
Would it be possible to make one of these from wood? If so, what kind of wood is best? Would it hold up to use?

http://www.austinkayak.com/images/productShots/large/269.jpg

http://www.bartonmarine.com/images/featured-products/featured-k-clam-cleats.jpg

I've wondered that myself, and have a nylon jam cleat like your first image on my dory skiff that I'd like to replace with wood. For smaller boats and low loading, I imagine that a decent hardwood would work well depending on grain. Cam cleats like your second pic would be much harder to make, and fail faster.

Capt Zatarra
08-09-2012, 10:57 PM
I would avoid oak as it has a tendency to fail on the growth ring on some species if cut too thin or small. I would choose Ipe or brazillian cherry or masquite. These are incredibly dense and hold up to uv degradation. Where as, in my experience, purple heart only last a couple of years before splitting on the grain lines when used on the deck of my old ketch. Capt. Z.

I forgot to write....., the first single piece jam cleat, I would make in two pieces. Cut the face (jam) grooves on the 5" side of a piece of wood about 1"x5"x12" with the table saw, with the blade tilted to 45 degrees, and lowered till the blade is only a 1/4 inch above the table. Set the miter gauge at 90 degrees. Make the first cut so that it runs 5 inches from one side to the other. Move the fence just enough to allow the second cut to form the first ridge of the face/jam grooves. Keep moving the fence and cutting till the entire surface is covered in grooves. Now set the miter gauge to 45 degrees and the saw blade back to 90 degrees and the fence to one inch. This will allow you to cut the 1"x5"x12" piece in to two 2 1/2" long pieces, two 4 1/2" long pieces, and five 6" long pieces. (These lengths are after you cut the ends square.) I would cut the 6" long pieces in half to make two 3" pieces. Now drill two holes for attaching to the deck or mast or where ever you desire. Then bevel the out side edge to your preference sand and varnish. Mount the two pieces with the end away from the load just ever so much wider then the end near the load. hope that helps. Capt. Z.

tdem
08-09-2012, 11:20 PM
Butler cleats are nice for quick release wooden cleats, see for example here (http://www.thecheappages.com/boat/matl/cleats.html#Butler) and here (http://www.unlikelyboatbuilder.com/2012/06/cleat-for-every-line.html).

Capt Zatarra
08-10-2012, 12:02 AM
Butler cleats are nice for quick release wooden cleats, see for example here (http://www.thecheappages.com/boat/matl/cleats.html#Butler) and here (http://www.unlikelyboatbuilder.com/2012/06/cleat-for-every-line.html).

I have used those before and love them. But I did not know what they were called. Thank you for the info. Capt. Z.

Wooden Boat Fittings
08-10-2012, 07:31 PM
The Butler cleats are simplest to make, but they rely for their jamming on the surface to which they're fastened (deck, boom, or whatever). This means that the line being belayed is constantly being scraped across that surface, and thus subject to wear (usually in the one spot, although end-for-ending it can help it last longer.) The type Arizona Bay mentions (http://www.woodenboatfittings.com.au/jamcleat.jpg) stands proud of the surface and thus avoids this problem. On the other hand, it needs a little more care in manufacture to get the taper correct for the size of line to be used.

Mike

neilm
08-11-2012, 12:05 PM
Thanks everyone! I'll make the Butler cleat first and see how it works. Since I'm curious I may also make a replica of the others too.

Neil

Ben Fuller
08-12-2012, 07:24 PM
And don't forget a pin sticking down for a doryman's hitch.

neilm
08-13-2012, 12:23 AM
http://neilmoomey.com/boats/wood_cleat-6672.jpg

OK, I made these prototypes out of some scrap wood. I was amazed how well they worked. The top one is Purple Heart and the others are just pallet wood. I may clean up the top one and mount it somewhere.

Ben, Thanks for the idea. I'll look it up.

Neil