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Scotty McDonald
08-01-2012, 12:50 PM
I'm building a 10' dinghy (Oughtred's design) for my first boat project. Anyone have suggestions on what type of wood to use for the stem? White oak is seeming impossible to find right now, at least in the Seattle area where I live. I've wondered whether ash might be suitable, but since I'm planning on bending a single piece rather than laminating, I'd like to know whether others have had any success with it.

Gib Etheridge
08-01-2012, 01:50 PM
Yellow cedar bends well when steamed, is very rot resistant, it glues very well, is great for laminating and is readily available.

TerryLL
08-01-2012, 02:22 PM
What design? Puffin?
What are the dimensions of the stem?
Why are you not laminating?
What do the plans call for?

ARW123
08-01-2012, 02:26 PM
I was always lead to believe that although it bends well, Ash is not the most durable of woods. Using such for a fundamental part of the boat might be a regret a few years down the line?

Peerie Maa
08-01-2012, 02:49 PM
If the boat is dry sailed ash will be OK, it has been used for steamed timbers for centuries.

Soundman67
08-01-2012, 03:59 PM
besides yellow cedar you have access to some of the best Doug Fir anywhere. tight grained old growth is still available and was used for frames and stems and keels on a lot of boats in the past.
Its a little stronger than yellow cedar but sligthly less rot resistant.

Sayla
08-02-2012, 02:48 AM
I'm building a 10' dinghy (Oughtred's design) for my first boat project. Anyone have suggestions on what type of wood to use for the stem? White oak is seeming impossible to find right now, at least in the Seattle area where I live. I've wondered whether ash might be suitable, but since I'm planning on bending a single piece rather than laminating, I'd like to know whether others have had any success with it.

Unless it's a work-boat, Oak seems excessive. I actually used laminated Western Red Cedar for the stem for a 10' Oughtred Acorn to keep the weight right down for car topping (and it worked fine), and then mahogany for the cutwater. Next time (I plan to build the same boat as 9' for a tender), I intend to use Celery Top pine to be a bit tougher, which I think is similar to your Yellow Cedar. I think hardwood is unnecessary unless you plan on dropping it a bit - even then it mightn't help.

sayla

Mrleft8
08-02-2012, 06:37 AM
Ash will rot while you watch.
It can't be a very big piece of wood that you're looking for. If it's something that could be sent UPS I'll send you a piece of White Oak.

willin woodworks
08-02-2012, 07:24 AM
What Lefty said. Ash looks real pretty in a canoe, not a great wood for a member like the stem. If I was me I'd use Doug Fir. I wish we had access to the DF that seems to grow like a weed in the PNW.

What does Oughtred reccomend? Isnt he pretty specific about materials?

Gerarddm
08-02-2012, 09:34 AM
I'm using Doug Fir for the stem on my 15' wherry.

TerryLL
08-02-2012, 09:40 AM
I'm still waiting to hear from Scotty about the design he's building and why he's going with a solid stem rather than laminating.

Scotty, calling Scotty.....
Come in Scotty.....