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JoeWolfe86
07-20-2012, 02:13 PM
Newbe Question: Having not built any boats yet I am wondering what values or habits will help. Not just to build a good boat but to help myself as well. What do you think?

I have always valued neatness. I was a programmer for 30 years and I always want neat program code. If it is sloppy where it doesn't count it will be also where it does count. Same for a boat.

I also value consistency. It helps to do things the same way every time in a program. If you do something once correctly then it is easier to do it ten more times correctly using the same method.

Correctness is also an issue. In a program everything has to be correct or it won't work. There is no room for errors. Each board in a boat should be correctly cut, fitted, fastened, and sealed to the board next to it.

Perserverance is a must in programming. There is also frustration, stress, attention to detail, concentration, precision, following directions, planning, large quantity of work, helpful work environment, ...

What do you think?

wizbang 13
07-20-2012, 02:33 PM
perfection is an unreasonable goal

seedy
07-20-2012, 02:33 PM
Use intuition and accept imperfections and let your hands teach your brain. You've been doing things on a screen in a controlled environment, this is not that same.

Gib Etheridge
07-20-2012, 02:56 PM
Don't be in a hurry. As soon as you are not only will you make more mistakes ("the faster I go the longer it takes") the less fun you'll have. So long as you're having fun what does it matter if it takes a bit longer? That works for me anyway, The Wiz can work at lightning speed, have fun and get a good job all at the same time. ;) (Hi Wiz)

esingleman
07-20-2012, 03:46 PM
Learn as much as you can from this forum, books, etc. and come up with a plan of action. Try to work precisely and most of all don't be afraid to make a mistake. When you do make a mistake (and we all do) half the fun is coming up with creative ways to overcome them.

Remember to be careful as you remove stock and get close to the desired shape, as it is difficult to add stock back to a piece of wood and have it look good, especially if it's one that will get varnished instead of painted.

hokiefan
07-20-2012, 04:06 PM
Measure twice, cut once.

Measure with a tape or ruler as seldom as possible. Use tick sticks or mark the piece directly where it fits every chance you get.

When you get tired quit. Can't tell you how often pushing through one more task at the end of the day caused 3 hours of rework the next day.

Pay attention so that you keep all of your blood inside your skin.

Have fun - the most important aspect.

Cheers,

Bobby

mcdenny
07-20-2012, 04:53 PM
When the epoxy starts to thicken throw it out. If you have taken too long to get it applied it will start to harden in the pot. It is expensive so there is a real temptation to get it applied quickly so it is not wasted. Big mistake, you will end up sanding off most of that epoxy you didn't waste.

Also, boat building is supposed to be fun. It's more fun if you are working with nice wood if you can afford it. I'd avoid fir plywood.

Denny Wolfe

GaryK
07-20-2012, 09:17 PM
Keep your wits about you when using power tools. (I still have all my fingers.)

and

Handmade means imperfections, its not like computer code.

Tom M.
07-20-2012, 09:48 PM
perfection is an unreasonable goal

Perfection MUST be the goal! But live with what you can get. Always reach for the ideal. That's how you get better. That's how you do the best you can in the moment.

Peter Malcolm Jardine
07-20-2012, 09:57 PM
Understand your own limitations.
Make friends with people who have higher skill levels than you do.
Avoid buying cheap tools.
Avoid buying cheap materials, but shop hard.
Allow yourself do overs. They happen.
Include your family in the build.
Remember that quality is not a relative fashion.

Capt Zatarra
07-21-2012, 01:37 AM
Joe your post really cought my attention. After reading your post twice through I thought I would whip out my 2 cents and toss them on the table. Mind ya don't have to take anything I say too seriously becuase I am as Phil Y says, one of those "mad buggers in crazy places doing genuine wooden boat stuff". So first of all there are several different types of wooden boat builders. All of them have some nessasary values in common.
1- independent, just about all of us work on our boat alone. Even if you are lucky enough to have friends and family that that are supportive it will be you alone, in your garage, workshop, backyard, or boatyard, most often cutting, sanding, screwing, and glueing all by your lonesome.
2- Your "Perserverance" will pay off here, I am sure that there are untold numbers of half built canoes, rowboats, day sailors, and coastal cruisers spread across the globe started by people with high hopes and dreams but that did not survive the ravages of time, money, and in most cases a long honey do list. I like to think of it more as 'Tenacious'. Think of yourself as the that little scrappy dog that has of hold of the piece of rope and even when he is lifted off the ground he is still growling and hanging on no matter how much someone tries to shake him off.
3- my third and final "Value" is, for lack of a better word, 'hands on'. Your down in the trenches. It's all you. It's put up or shut up. There is a fair number of people in this world who can derive suffencent enjoyment from just talking about their project or even someone elses project that they never actually accomplish anything. Society calls most of these people 'Critics'. These people should be avoided. They are the opposite of a boatbuilder, and can suck the life and light out of craftsman's eyes like the cold, dark reaches of outer space from a breached hull of a star fighter.

Now what I about to say is in reference several of your "values" that sort of jumped off the page at me.
The first is neatness. I get the sense that you are referencing the boat not the workspace. There are boatbuilder on this forum who will build "Down and Dirty" boats in ONE afternoon. Most of the time a little longer. These guys are done and in the water having more fun then a telephone booth full of clowns while the neat and tidy crowd are still holding push pins in the corner of their mouth while trying to square up their list of scantling on the wall of their shop. Neatness falls somewhere between choice and obsession for boatbuilders, and the stitch and glue guys will sometimes trade the neat and tidy for speed. Not a bad thing, just a choice.

Consistency. This may be an asset in the world of computers where doing the same thing overtime is an asset. But in boatbuilding? Consistently safe, absolutely! Consistently striving for your personal best, fundamental! Consistently looking cool, just ask James McMullen! BUT consistency of method as you imply will limit you in ways you may not be able to imagine before your first build. Boatbuilding is an indevor that has sprung from many cultures over many hundreds of years, with many different methods for doing the same jobs. Beware of limiting yourself.

Correctness. "Each board in a boat should be correctly cut, fitted, fastened, and sealed to the board next to it." that sounds an awful lot like 'Perfection' and that is the bar that every one strives for but since no two boards are ever the same, something to do with snowflakes and fingerprints, the grain of a board, quarter sawn, flat sawn, north side or south side of the tree, ring count per inch, fiddleback, straight grain, forest grown, second planting, old growth, Doug fir VS hemlock, all this and so much more will conspire to make no two boards to ever act the same when being cut, fitted, fastened and sealed to the board next to it. As woodworkers, we do the best we can, to get as close as we can, in as reasonable amount of time as we can, to make things as perfect as we can. On more then one occasion my wife has looked over my shoulder as I am shaving and sanding a board to fit in it designated place, only to say "No one will ever see that you know" and I always reply "I will". The problem is, I see every flaw and mistake. I would still be on my first project if I had to have everything correct. You get it as close as you can to make it fit and then hit it with a big fricken mallet and move on to the next piece. That is if you ever want to get on the water.

I encourage you to start soon on your first project. Every boat I have built or repaired, or rebuilt, has tought me a lot about boatbuilding and a lot about myself. Leave yourself open to discover the type of boatbuilder you are. Capt. Z.

beernd
07-21-2012, 05:32 AM
Perserverance, indeed, you will detect errors in your offset table, you correct them. Then you find out that the errors don't occur in all the station moulds.
So there you go again.
This is what happened to me, anyway. I have wrestled for over a week with 1/5 scale drawings of the station moulds.
Trust your eyes and your batten, in the end a measurement in an offset table is just a number, that can be very wrong.

Also on a side note, the considerable flair in the bow section of the boat, although very pretty, was making the planking and fairing of the hull a real PITA.
So in my lonesome I decided that I was going to build strait. Maybe take a peak on my thread :

http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?147302-First-build-from-DN-Goodchild-plan

I am by profession a metal lathe worker, no carpenter at all.
Building is a challenge, it will give you moments of utter frustration.
But overall it is a fantastic expierience. |:)

Cheers

Even when I had all my station moulds up and started building the chine logs, I had to make corrections.

JoeWolfe86
07-21-2012, 05:46 AM
Thanks to everyone. I enjoyed reading your responses and I made notes to ponder.

Thanks. Joe.

Lewisboater
07-21-2012, 09:14 AM
A hull has two sides...when building it, what is done to one side must be done to the other before moving on...otherwise things get out of symmetry quickly and sometimes not noticed until it is too late. Also...don't forget to step back and look at things between steps... being too focused can cause you to lose track of the big picture and things go wonky...(first hand knowledge on this one).

OOOPS!!

http://www.angelfire.com/ego/lewisboatworks/Stuff/Peerosail/ODL-Screwup1.jpg

Lastly...building boats is like eating chips...one is never enough and the whole bag is just enough to satisfy for a little while. You are usually reaching for the next one before you finish crunching the last one. Personally I have fifteen or so under my belt...and at least another dozen in me before my whiskey plank gets nailed.

Steamboat
07-21-2012, 10:44 AM
Relax - you are not in the world of code & syntax.
1) Common sense is invaluable.
2) Learn what a fair curve is and apply it to your work.
3) Build to 1/16" tolerance.
4) Refresh your practical geometry, you will use the skill. Not so much a protractor but straight edge, bevel gage & compass.
5) Measure twice & cut once. You do not need to measure 5X and calculate a valid standard deviation.

Bert Langley
07-21-2012, 11:38 AM
All of the above, plus I practice this: If I get to the point with something and say to myself "that is good enough". I stop for the day right then. "Good enough" seldom is, and for me that is usually a sign I am tired or just not interested enough. This is supposed to be fun and if it is not then walk away and start fresh some other time.

pipefitter
07-21-2012, 01:06 PM
And don't let anyone catch you counting 16ths on a rule with a pencil.

Boats can be built too perfectly and to the point of a seeming, machine made sterility IMO. There is something ultimately pleasing with objects that look handmade and this is especially true with wood. It's harder to do with composite materials for being so uniform to start with. Some people can't do it. Their stuff comes out looking like it was cut out with a computer guided laser or like perfectly pressed creases in a pair of Levis.

Use the force.

Pericles
07-21-2012, 01:20 PM
Boats are tools for getting afloat and doing things. A youngster's raft will give him or her, a huge amount of fun. Decide how long you and your loved ones are prepared to wait to cast off and have fun. Then build accordingly.

OTOH, there are boatbuilders here who seem to prefer the building process. Whatever floats your boat is best.

E.Johnson
07-30-2012, 05:36 PM
My $0.02:

+ Measure twice, cut never, until you come back the next day and check your measurements (if working alone) or until a second pair of eyes can check your work. I thought I had my measurements standing at attention (and drew them with marker (!) on the wood) only to discover AFTER cutting that I was off. And not "off a little", a lot. I am only suggesting this for n00b boatbuilders like me.

+ There's "what the plans specify" and then there's "reality". Be prepared to make on-the-fly adjustments for reality.

+ Think of the most annoying song you've ever heard on the radio. Not too hard... I don't want anyone getting earworms! The point is, somebody took the time to write that annoying song and get signed to a record deal (or whatever the kool kids do these days) while the next Mozart is toiling away over a harpsichord somewhere, writing "...songs that voices never share." This is NOT an endorsement for mediocrity or even doing incredibly awful work. It is to say that at some point, decide where the line for "good enough" exists and move on. Look, I've made art, I've written over 80 "songs that voices never share" and I'm a master at noting where all of the flaws are. Everyone else? They're impressed that I could draw or play the guitar. So it may be with your home-made boat. Protip: Really gouge up the bottom of the hull and therefore only you and the fish will see the imperfections.

+ My brother's advice: Just build the [durned] thing.

+ But most of all... HAVE FUN!

I'll be keeping an eye out for your "new build" thread.

Jay Greer
07-30-2012, 06:16 PM
Joe, In my humble opinion, you are off to a good start. This forum is, most likely, the greatest source of practical boat building knowledge in the world. I sincerely wish that something like this was available when I first started some seventy years ago.

Here is some advice I gave my son when he first went to work with me.
Never be in a hurry! Patience will get you further down the road of correct boat building will than speed will. Speed comes with the assurance that is the result of practice.
Above all, one who listens to too much good advice ends up making other people's mistakes!
In other words; Trust in your own instincts!
Jay

kenjamin
07-30-2012, 06:28 PM
I met a guy at a boat show one time that was showing a skiff that was so perfect that his wife wouldn't let him put it in the water. Perfection has its price.

hokiefan
07-30-2012, 09:04 PM
Joe, In my humble opinion, you are off to a good start. This forum is, most likely, the greatest source of practical boat building knowledge in the world. I sincerely wish that something like this was available when I first started some seventy years ago.

Here is some advice I gave my son when he first went to work with me.
Never be in a hurry! Patience will get you further down the road of correct boat building will than speed will. Speed comes with the assurance that is the result of practice.
Above all, one who listens to too much good advice ends up making other people's mistakes!
In other words; Trust in your own instincts!
Jay

This is sage advice from a man who has built more boats than most of the rest of us combined. Never, ever get in a hurry.

I make my living in the chemical industry, mistakes can be dangerous. The first thing I tell new hire operators is to NEVER get in a hurry. Work steadily, move from one task to the next as you can. Nothing good will come from getting in a hurry. Its also the last thing I remind old timers before we start a shutdown. You will get to the end faster by working methodically and thoughtfully.

And you'll be more likely to have all of your pieces attached.

Cheers,

Bobby

Y Bar Ranch
07-30-2012, 10:00 PM
Newbe Question: Having not built any boats yet I am wondering what values or habits will help. Not just to build a good boat but to help myself as well. What do you think?

I have always valued neatness. I was a programmer for 30 years and I always want neat program code. If it is sloppy where it doesn't count it will be also where it does count. Same for a boat.

I also value consistency. It helps to do things the same way every time in a program. If you do something once correctly then it is easier to do it ten more times correctly using the same method.

Correctness is also an issue. In a program everything has to be correct or it won't work. There is no room for errors. Each board in a boat should be correctly cut, fitted, fastened, and sealed to the board next to it.

Perserverance is a must in programming. There is also frustration, stress, attention to detail, concentration, precision, following directions, planning, large quantity of work, helpful work environment, ...

What do you think?

There is not really an analogy to the build, test, build cycle of software program. You compile your boat once, so it involves a different dynamic as far as commitment to your decisions go.

Like so many other things in life, with the finishing of my first boat I proclaimed, "now I am ready to do this."

Best just to have at it. Enjoy!

E.Johnson
07-30-2012, 10:41 PM
You compile your boat once, so it involves a different dynamic as far as commitment to your decisions go.

And failing that, you can compost it. :p

Larks
07-30-2012, 11:41 PM
I can't believe these guys have left out the two most important habits that any bloke who wants to build a boat must employ and practice as often as could be considered humanly possible:
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Wash the dishes and be nice to your missus!!!!

P.L.Lenihan
07-31-2012, 12:38 AM
I can't believe these guys have left out the two most important habits that any bloke who wants to build a boat must employ and practice as often as could be considered humanly possible:

Wash the dishes and be nice to your missus!!!!



Wise words these are and I've got the dish-pan hands and empty bank account to prove it too!:D

By now you may have noticed the word "fun" is a common recommendation in many of the suggestions already offered. Unless you are begining a carreer in boatbuilding and desperately need to feed the family on this sole sourch of income, it is just a hobby.Sure, there will be times when the hobby may seem back-breaking,tedious and alot like work,but do not be fooled by this.You should always be in a postion to make and have fun with it. If you can't have fun with yourself and your hobby project, ask your spouse what needs fixin' around the house.........



Cheers!


Peter

Bram V
07-31-2012, 10:40 AM
When you go building, have something to drink close, just a bottle of lemonade (with cap if you don't like consuming your boat).
Prepare for your workspace to be filled a long time.
Have music you like in your workshop, I myself like classical music as it puts me in the mood to lovingly caress the wood with sandpaper.
Check whether you prefer hand tools or power tools, I like hand tools, it makes the build more fun, if a lot slower, to me.
Be absolutely sure you want the boat in the plans, choosing the boat needs as much perfection as building it (for the less perfectionist: a lot more. If you can, touch one, or better yet, sail with one before you are absolutely sure. Don't start the build if, upon inspecting the plans, you are no longer sure.
Check your design brief with the boat you are building. You probably had customers who said "No, wait, I want that as well" which was impossible in your design. Don't be that guy to yourself.

So: you should devolop Patience, Perseverance and Preparedness.

Crazer
07-31-2012, 12:35 PM
The only thing I have to add to the vast pool of wisdom in this thread is "build a boat you love." Anything else will suffer from loss of interest and as a result, loss of quality. Also, "a" boat you love does not need to be "the" boat you love. Your first boat shouldn't be a boat for the ages. :)

Bob Cleek
07-31-2012, 01:54 PM
Hard to add much to all this sage advice, but here's a few that might help someday. They apply to craftsmanship of any type, not just building boats.

1. DEVELOP A "GOOD EYE" AND TRUST IT. As the old saying goes, "House carpenters build to the nearest quarter inch. Finish carpenters build to the nearest sixteenth inch. Cabinetmakers build to the nearest thirty-second inch. And boatbuilders build to the nearest boat." A "perfect fit" is the result of your eyes and your hands, not a tape measure or a saw fence. Remember, power tools, especially the stationary ones, were designed for repetitive production work where a premium is put on cutting the same size piece over and over again. That's fine in a factory, but you are only building one boat at a time. Generally, it is a lot quicker and easier to use hand tools on one-off jobs when the set-up time for a power tool is considered. This is the difference between craftsmanship and production. "Cut wide of the line and sneak up on it."

2. BRING A CLEAR MIND TO THE TASK AT HAND. Don't indulge in intoxicants when buidling a boat. There are some routine tasks, such as driving a car or barbequeing ribs, that can be adequately performed after banging back a few belts or taking a few tokes on a doob (given enough practice), but boatbuilding isn't one of them. Absolute sobriety while building a boat is a must. Even a beer or two can, and will eventually, result in a costly mistake at some point. Indeed, when working with power tools, even a painful mistake! The same goes for distractions of any sort. You shouldn't attempt to work with little kids playing at your feet in the shop. If you must attend to parenting obligations, use the time to sweep the floor rather than run the table saw. The ability to concentrate all your senses on what you are doing is essential.

3. LOVE YOUR TOOLS. Every minute spent caring for your tools saves ten using them. Sharpen edges often. Keep tools clean. Most importantly, keep your tools organized and orderly... a place for everything and everything in its place. This will save you untold hours otherwise spent looking for a particularly sized wrench, socket or whatever among a mass of stuff floating around in the bottom of a drawer or toolbox. Clean tools as necessary after each use. NEVER, EVER, LOAN A TOOL YOU WOULDN'T SIMPLY GIVE AWAY. (And the correlary: If somebody loans you a tool, return it promptly, clean and sharp and in better condition that you received it... together with an appropriate gratuity. A fifth of Jack is always appreciated.)

wizbang 13
07-31-2012, 02:01 PM
" Don't indulge in intoxicants when buidling a boat"
aw gawd

willin woodworks
07-31-2012, 02:28 PM
lots of good advice..
My two cents:
Buy a good coffee pot
Have a comfortable chair or stool to sit on when it comes time to ponder. Mine is next to the coffee pot and close to my pipe and tobacco tin.
Good tunes
Good dust masks
ALWAYS keep edge tools sharp. One morning on a regular basis is devoted to sharpening everything before work gets started. Send out your saws regularly. Change planer and jointer blades before they get dull and start to chew up your good teak.
Have at least two of every circular saw blade so one is in the saw and one is off getting filed. Dull saws eat wood and fingers.
Good lighting
Stop when you're tired
Comfortable, substantial boots.
Use the same tape and the same ruler all the time. No two are the same.
Buy an electric pencil sharpener and use it a lot. Pencils are cheap. Mahogany is expensive.
Sharp pocket knife is a must.
The plans are a guide and they can be wrong. Trust your eyes and your gut and dont be afraid to ask somebody you trust "Does this look right?"
A mentor of mine once told me: If you are rushing you are doing one of two things. Making a mistake or trying to fix it before I see it." Take your time.
Never open a beer until you've closed your tool box.
It's gonna take twice as long as you think to build and it's gonna cost three times as much. Count on it.
Cheap tools cost more than good tools.
One of the best tips I've ever gotten was from an old timer on this forum who has sadly passed; Dave Fleming advised turning your back to the layout, bending over and looking at it through your legs. Honest to God it is a great way to check your work especially curves. Try it before you laugh.
First and foremost have a good time and when you're not enjoying what you're doing take a break. Sit on the comfortable stool, listen to the good tunes and have a cup of coffee.....

MoMan
07-31-2012, 02:30 PM
I only have one boat under my belt, but I would add visualize: Try to visualize how the step you are working on now will integrate with the next two or three steps. If your build starts upside down, visualize how things will look when it comes time to flip the hull rightside up. Visualize using the boat and enjoying it on the water when you finish it. If you are confused about something in the plans (or when you make a mistake that needs correcting), take some pictures and post a question here before you proceed. Take lots of pictures and start another entertaining build thread here so we can all have fun with your build vicariously.

HarryH
07-31-2012, 03:03 PM
Well, having done several decades or so of computing (networks and some coding), I think perseverance is a great thing, and I hope it proves a great tool for you, Joe. The other attributes you mention, applied to building my boat I find, not so much. Flexibility, an open mind and the willingness to learn (this sometimes shows up as humility) serve well. Quality work, fair lines, tight joints are always the goal, but I have learned the hard way that I can overwork a good fit to the point of wishing I'd stopped earlier.

Most of all, it is far more important to me to enjoy the process than suffer toward a goal; quite the opposite of my youth. Nevertheless, perseverance shows up: everyday I work on my boat, even if it is just organizing tools/materials.

I'm with Pipefitter when he speaks of the hand crafted look (that bespeaks quality). I see it as one of the things that make wooden objects appealing, be they rocking chairs, or boats. Doug Hylan, a boat builder whose work I admire, talks about the draw of hand worked railings and fiddles for instance, instead of the appearance of perfectly symmetrical pieces knocked out completely by a router, etc.

Strive for the best one can do, but not to the point of unhappiness.

One definition of a Perfectionist: One who takes great pains, and.........Gives Them to Everyone Else.

gondolier88
07-31-2012, 04:16 PM
Having only being involved with wooden boat restoration in the last two years I won't preach on the finer points of wood butchery, but I am a time served heating engineer and keen artist since I was knee-high to a grasshopper, some observations on projects that I have undertaken;

- If you feel comfortable before a task, you will feel comfortable during and after a task- if you feel uncomfortable it's because you are unsure, at this point STOP. Sit down, have a break, have a drink (again, wholeheartedly NOT alcohol- just plain old watter does fine), read one of those books you have on the subject of whatever the task is, just do something that relaxes you- I usually need at least 10mins, when you go back I guarantee you will feel comfortable with the task, if you don't...

- Never be scared to pack up your tools, tidy up, give your project a goodnight pat and go home- if you are not feeling it for whatever reason you will make a mistake. My best projects have all had periods of a couple of days, weeks and even months, in some cases, where nothing at all has been done on them- a luxury that we as hobby boat nuts have over boat builders who charge per hour- you will begin to miss working on it, and at that point you will have got the passion that you had at the beginning and your ready to start work again- hopefully if you have done the above, you will come back to a tidy workplace...

- Planning your project down to the tiniest detail- this works for me, I know others prefer to work to a general schedule. I like to write down how many feet of wood of each size, how many nails, screws, tins of paint etc. I then link a schedule of work with my materials list and come up with generous estimates of hours per task. I can then work through as a tick list, adding smaller tasks to it as I find them- being able to tick something off a list, no matter how small, is a massive boost- this is especially true on tasks that are overly tedious.

Best of luck with your project, look forward to seeing a new build thread...

Greg

E.Johnson
07-31-2012, 04:28 PM
(Meanwhile the OP quit the forum and has taken up basket weaving or something.) ;)

Hope not, but lots of good suggestions anyway! Especially the ones about drinking *after* working. I know there's divergent opinions about that if the various build threads are any indication, but personally, I'd rather save the grown-up beverages as a reward rather than utter the famous last words, "hold my beer and watch THIS!"

@Gondolier88: Yes, a project plan would probably be a fantastic idea, especially as the complexity of the boat build rises. I was "winging it" with my inaugural build and finally made a quickie project plan on my cell phone so I'd at least have a handy guide to what steps are yet to be done. If I wanted to I could go completely bananas and whip up something in MS Project (or equivalent), which the OP might want to consider doing.

Phil Y
07-31-2012, 05:57 PM
I'm with Greg-happy wife, happy life.

And other than that, its not the mistakes that matter, its how you cover them up. In that respect building a boat is nothing like writing code.

Bob Cleek
07-31-2012, 10:21 PM
" Don't indulge in intoxicants when buidling a boat"
aw gawd

No, really. I'm serious. I bang 'em back with the best of 'em. I'm speaking from experience. It screws up your concentration. Things happen like laying a pattern on the wrong side of the wood or intently cutting on the wrong side of the line. Once I spent a fair amount of time setting up my router so the bit was exactly the right depth for a rabet in a very expensive hunk of Corian, but I'd failed to pass on the opportunity when somebody passed me (deleted to prevent self-incrimination.) I forgot to tighten the set screw on the router depth adjustment. When I began the cut, completely conscious, or so I thought, the bit dropped and ruined the rabet cut. Thank God for epoxy!

You've got to keep your wits about you if you want to do accurate detail work.

E.Johnson
07-31-2012, 10:28 PM
Yeah, and boatbuilding only involves, you know, tools that can sever limbs and stuff. I know a person's home workshop is his or her castle and all that, but would a boat building (or any trade) company let their workers drink on the job? Save it for after work.

johnw
07-31-2012, 10:39 PM
" Don't indulge in intoxicants when buidling a boat"
aw gawd

It's called the whiskey plank because you drink the whiskey after you hang it.

johnw
07-31-2012, 10:40 PM
I would suggest you keep the scale of your first project at a level you can complete in a reasonable time. There are too many lifetime builds in the world already.

Draketail
08-01-2012, 04:44 AM
Agreed. Drink alcohol only after closing the tool box and shutting off the machines. Machines are carnivorous!

Bram V
08-01-2012, 04:57 AM
I agree and disagree on the alcohol part. When using powertools such as routers and band saws, it is hazardous to boat and body. When sanding with paper or painting, having a nice beer with the cap back on is nice, when looking through the papers/instructions without doing anything permanent it won't hurt as well.
One, however, is a nice amount, a good porter or IPA is a drink for over an hour, especially with a bottle of water next to it. Whatever you eat and drink, have it in enclosed containers, you'll want to build your boat, not ingest it.

Make your boatbuilding activity the same as why other people paint or make models, a nice way to relax and make something beautiful, if you can't relax without good progress, you'll probably have to use more powertools and accept a lower amount of finish, and you'll be "That guy with a boat" soon(ish). If you smile at every curve and surface being just right before even thinking of a paintbrush, you'll be "that guy building a boat" for a few years. It all depends on the guy you wish to be.

JoeWolfe86
08-01-2012, 06:23 AM
Thanks to everyone. I enjoyed reading your responses and I made notes to ponder.

Thanks. Joe.

johnw
08-01-2012, 01:06 PM
I agree and disagree on the alcohol part. When using powertools such as routers and band saws, it is hazardous to boat and body. When sanding with paper or painting, having a nice beer with the cap back on is nice, when looking through the papers/instructions without doing anything permanent it won't hurt as well.
One, however, is a nice amount, a good porter or IPA is a drink for over an hour, especially with a bottle of water next to it. Whatever you eat and drink, have it in enclosed containers, you'll want to build your boat, not ingest it.

Make your boatbuilding activity the same as why other people paint or make models, a nice way to relax and make something beautiful, if you can't relax without good progress, you'll probably have to use more powertools and accept a lower amount of finish, and you'll be "That guy with a boat" soon(ish). If you smile at every curve and surface being just right before even thinking of a paintbrush, you'll be "that guy building a boat" for a few years. It all depends on the guy you wish to be.

I've actually made small, crude models of my boats before I tackle the full-sized one. But if I'm going to make one worth looking at, why shouldn't I be able to get in it and go sailing?

Bram V
08-02-2012, 03:31 AM
Beauty of a boat is not only aesthetics, it is also how it works. I worded it poorly, sorry, better would be "something you can be proud of". I was merely stating that you'll have to like the activity of boatbuilding, especially if you wish to strive for perfection.

Bill R
08-02-2012, 03:03 PM
Lot of good advice here.

Don't let perfection be the enemy of the good.

Don't hurry, and don't work tired. Not heeding that advice recently cost me the tip of my thumb, a bunch of stitches, a couple weeks out of the shop and ruined workpiece. Don't be afraid to put the tools away. The work will be there in the morning.

Most importantly- HAVE FUN. Savor the experience.

rvanvoris
08-05-2012, 07:13 AM
"men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds, wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act on their dreams with open eyes, to make them possible." T. E. Laurance

In my shop my watchword is " Don't let perfection get in the way of done"

Oldad
08-05-2012, 09:07 AM
If you are using epoxy, scrape away (with a well sharpened scraper) any runs or ridges while it is still green. Much easier and less damage to surrounding wood than doing when fully cured.

willin woodworks
08-06-2012, 09:37 AM
Build the boat in your head. Over and over and over again. Visualize the next task at hand and go over it in your head, step by step. you quite literally cannot do this enough times.

Redeye
08-24-2012, 04:05 PM
Build the boat in your head. Over and over and over again. Visualize the next task at hand and go over it in your head, step by step. you quite literally cannot do this enough times.


This is quite possibly the biggest part of the whole planning and execution of a larger (or any) boat. I'm planning a bigger build soon (ish...) and I've built and rebuilt the boat hundreds of times already in my head. From determining exactly how I will fasten each joint, to the layout of scarf joints. From positions of limber holes and how to avoid notching the outside edge of the stringer to how I will run the few wires I'll need for Nav lights and where I will route the bilge pump exit piping. Even how I will cut my stringers from the filch using a skillsaw and how I'll cut the perfect radiuses with a router used like a compass. Think everything through.

stormpetrel
08-24-2012, 05:31 PM
...unless, of course, the aspiring boatbuilder IS the "missus"! stormpetrel

Bram V
08-24-2012, 06:00 PM
If so, you either have exactly the same things to keep in mind, or a very happy partner.

Kiaora
10-29-2012, 11:25 AM
Mr. Hammond, I've tried a couple of posts to catch you and ask you a few "Pogo" questions. I'm the new owner of the fiberglass hulled POGO that was the subject of some exchanges between you and JamieT (previous owner). Thank you. Tom

esdren
10-29-2012, 12:20 PM
something my father always told me.....When using a tape and you need precise measurements burn an inch. Dont just assume the tip is sliding back and forth correctly.