PDA

View Full Version : saucepans



Minnesnowtan
07-09-2012, 02:47 PM
Picking up a new induction range this week. I cook with cast iron, however, I do not have cast iron sauce pans. I need a good set of sauce pans with lids that are induction friendly. Any suggestions?

Figment
07-09-2012, 02:51 PM
Maybe. What exactly makes an object "induction friendly"?

David W Pratt
07-09-2012, 03:03 PM
Easily hypnotized?

Tom Montgomery
07-09-2012, 03:04 PM
Picking up a new induction range this week. I cook with cast iron, however, I do not have cast iron sauce pans. I need a good set of sauce pans with lids that are induction friendly. Any suggestions?

OK... here is something from Walmart that actually is a fantastic value: Tramontina Stainless Steel Try-Ply Clad cookware. It is available through Walmart ONLY online. This cookware is NOT available in Walmart stores. It is certified NSF.

I purchased the 10-piece set which consists of:
12 qt covered stock pot
2 qt covered saucepan
4 qt covered sauce pan
10 inch frypan
12 inch frypan
5 qt covered dutch oven

Additional pieces are also available. 1 qt, 1.5 qt, 3 qt. and 4 qt. Saucepans w/lids are available separately.

I own All-Clad 1 & 1.5 qt covered saucepans and an All-Clad 4 qt saute pan. My Tramontina Try-Ply Clad cookware is just as good at a fraction of the price.

Tom Montgomery
07-09-2012, 03:04 PM
Maybe. What exactly makes an object "induction friendly"?

Steel. Or Aluminum/copper/etc. clad in stainless steel.

The key is magnetism.

An aluminum pan is not induction friendly (it won't heat at all).

Paul Pless
07-09-2012, 03:11 PM
Curious why you chose an induction range top?

Tom Montgomery
07-09-2012, 03:15 PM
About NSF certification: In most cases, if you are not a food service professional, NSF certified products are not an issue. For the home or amateur chef, product performance and quality are of higher importance than the guarantee of product safety since almost all major brands of cookware and kitchen equipment self-regulate and maintain at least the minimum level of safety standards in their choice of materials and manufacturing processes.

For the professional kitchen, NSF certification is very important. For many restaurants, the use of NSF certified products is a necessity to show the company has done their job in protecting their customers by selecting products known and tested to be safe. Supermarkets butcher their meats with NSF certified equipment and fast food chains cook with tools bearing the NSF mark to protect themselves as much as their customers.

Minnesnowtan
07-09-2012, 03:25 PM
Basically for efficiency, and ease of clean up. I have cooked on gas and electric and well, I hate cleaning the drip pans, and using my grandmother's glass smooth electric cook top, I know I want to go induction as the glass was still hot on standard electric and burned on everything. So mainly it is ease of clean up and the fact that the majority of my cookware is already cast iron except for sauce pans.

Kaa
07-09-2012, 03:38 PM
Lodge sells at least one cast-iron sauce pan.

Kaa

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
07-09-2012, 03:45 PM
Le Creuset

katey
07-09-2012, 03:49 PM
I believe Costco sells the Tramontina set as well.

Stainless steel is not particularly magnetic. I'm surprised that the clad pans work at all.

David W Pratt
07-09-2012, 03:54 PM
re #7
If non NSF certified cooking was that dangerous, we'd all be dead

Minnesnowtan
07-09-2012, 04:00 PM
I don't know about a cast iron sauce pan, as generally with liquids involved, it would easily dissolve the seasoning on such a pot.

Kaa
07-09-2012, 04:06 PM
I don't know about a cast iron sauce pan, as generally with liquids involved, it would easily dissolve the seasoning on such a pot.

Why would you need seasoning on a *sauce* pan? Raw cast iron should be good enough unless your liquids are very acidic in which case you'd want a le creuset-type enameled pan...

Kaa

Tom Montgomery
07-09-2012, 04:09 PM
Le Creuset
Oh yeah! If price is no object. ;)

I own one Le Creuset piece: a 9 qt stock pot that I purchased at a deep discount in a going-out-of-business sale (the owner was on her way to prison for the arson of her first store). I love it!

I also have a 6-qt Lodge enameled cast-iron pot that I purchased for 1/3 the price. I love it as well. :D

Minnesnowtan
07-09-2012, 04:15 PM
Why would you need seasoning on a *sauce* pan? Raw cast iron should be good enough unless your liquids are very acidic in which case you'd want a le creuset-type enameled pan...

Kaa


I have a 14yr old and a 8yr old who are learning how to cook, I would own stock in brillo with the rougher surface of cast iron, and one arm would be twice the size of the other from all the scrubbing.

Kaa
07-09-2012, 04:31 PM
I have a 14yr old and a 8yr old who are learning how to cook, I would own stock in brillo with the rougher surface of cast iron, and one arm would be twice the size of the other from all the scrubbing.

:-)

http://www.greatnecktools.com/upload/products_images/CBC2.jpg

But otherwise I'm a bit confused -- do you want non-stick sauce pans? Or just stainless?

Kaa

Peter Malcolm Jardine
07-09-2012, 09:08 PM
I have a set of Canadian Paderno, but they won't work with induction. Great pots though.

mikefrommontana
07-09-2012, 11:51 PM
I have a bunch of Revere Ware pots and a couple of cast iron skillets. Good cookware should last a lifetime, though many get caught up in trying to keep their kitchen fashionable and throw out perfectly good pots and pans.

Of course there's also a lot of crap out there too though.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
07-10-2012, 03:46 PM
Oh yeah! If price is no object. ;)

I own one Le Creuset piece: a 9 qt stock pot that I purchased at a deep discount in a going-out-of-business sale (the owner was on her way to prison for the arson of her first store). I love it!.....

For good quality pans the price is soon enough forgotten - I've had a Le Creuset omelette pan for over thirty years and a set of Cuisinox Elysee saucepans for twenty five - and I think they'll see me out.

http://www.salamandercookshop.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=4160 < recommended.

Enamelled cast iron casserole dishes make VERY handy saucepans - and the vitreous enamel means that the acidity of a tomato based sauce is a non-issue.
http://www.lakeland.co.uk/16112/Cast-Iron-24cm-Casserole