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View Full Version : Where's Waldo? (I mean where's the sapwood line?)



chuckt
07-02-2012, 09:19 AM
Your looking at one of my white oak timbers. This one is intended for the sternpost. I'm confused by the coloration changes. Is the sapwood line at the 7 inch mark or the 2 and 1/2 inch mark? 7 inches of sapwood seems like a lot and if that is it, this piece is not big enough for my sternpost.

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss151/cmeke0870/3601dbd5.jpg

Mrleft8
07-02-2012, 09:29 AM
@ 2.75"

Mrleft8
07-02-2012, 09:32 AM
.... And BTW..... "Waldo" is our puppy Aldo's invisible evil twin brother..... You do NOT want to find Waldo.... :D

chuckt
07-02-2012, 10:09 AM
Good news. I thought it must be at 2.5 but the dinstinct coloration change at 7 was making me scratch my head.

I take it that Waldo lives in the same body and emerges occaisonally? I wish I had an invisible twin to blame things on.

Mrleft8
07-02-2012, 10:25 AM
The color change at 7" looks more like a blue mold stain, which may, or may not disappear as you plane more wood off the surface. Sometimes it will commute straight through a board (Like with Maple, or Sycamore), and sometimes it's merely a surface discoloration.

David G
07-02-2012, 10:28 AM
Lefty could well be right. I'd want to get a good view of the end of that stick before I came to a conclusion.

Mrleft8
07-02-2012, 10:32 AM
7" of sapwood in a White Oak log would be exceptional.....

chuckt
07-02-2012, 10:33 AM
It is indeed a blue mold-like stain. If you look close you will see the wood is darker (and redder) inside the stain. I've read that can come from a reaction to the iron in the saw blade? Iv'e read the blue mold stain is in sapwood as it is the critters eating the sap?

Mrleft8
07-02-2012, 11:00 AM
It's different. Blue stain is caused by a reaction of the acids to iron.... Which can come from saw blades, or other sources.... Even your hands.
Blue mold is an organic fungal thing which I really can't explain, but I'm sure that Bob Smalser, or one of the other wood cutting types can....
Or I could be entirely confused, and wrong on both accounts.... In any case, It won't affect the integrity of your plank.

David G
07-02-2012, 12:31 PM
7" of sapwood in a White Oak log would be exceptional.....

Agreed. Any yet, we don't know where in the bole this slab is from. Is it the second cut in - which, from the curvature of the wane, it could be? If so, we could be seeing the very first nibble at the heartwood, which would be wider on the opposite face, and even wider on the subsequent slab.

As I said, I'd want to see a shot of the endgrain before I came to a firm conclusion.

chuckt
07-02-2012, 01:01 PM
I'll cut the end to expose the grain. It is gooped with Anchor seal right now so you can;t see the grain without getting a new clean cut.

Mrleft8
07-02-2012, 02:56 PM
I'll cut the end to expose the grain. It is gooped with Anchor seal right now so you can;t see the grain without getting a new clean cut.
WAIT!!!!!

Agreed. Any yet, we don't know where in the bole this slab is from. Is it the second cut in - which, from the curvature of the wane, it could be? If so, we could be seeing the very first nibble at the heartwood, which would be wider on the opposite face, and even wider on the subsequent slab.

As I said, I'd want to see a shot of the endgrain before I came to a firm conclusion.
C'mon tuff guy!..... Wanna bet!? :D ;)

David G
07-02-2012, 04:35 PM
WAIT!!!!!

C'mon tuff guy!..... Wanna bet!? :D ;)

No..... that's what I was saying.

Mrleft8
07-02-2012, 05:12 PM
Hmmmpppffftttt!!!!!..... Yer no fun ......;)....... OK Chuck...... Let's see the end grain.....

Gib Etheridge
07-02-2012, 05:44 PM
I would say that from the high number of rings per inch and what might be the pith center at 9" that it was cut from very near the center of a 24" log. The angle of the bark and the fact that rings get wider below the 9" mark indicate that it could be from a much bigger log, the pith may be on the other side and not showing. Either way, 2 1/2" of sapwood, my opinion. The end grain should show it better.

chuckt
07-02-2012, 08:56 PM
I almost forgot! Here ya go:

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss151/cmeke0870/Concordia/242699e3.jpg


http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss151/cmeke0870/Concordia/947d40c3.jpg

David G
07-02-2012, 09:09 PM
Looks to me like Lefty had it nailed all along (screwed, stapled, epoxied, riveted?)

Gib Etheridge
07-02-2012, 09:18 PM
Looks like the sapwood is about 3 times the thickness of the bark at the upper right corner.

The way the black stain crosses the rings I would guess that there was some steel down lower in that log, not fungus.

chuckt
07-02-2012, 09:56 PM
I don't like the look of those checks.

One of the other pieces might be a better candidate for the sternpost. It looks like the next cut up but it may not be wide enough.

Mrleft8
07-03-2012, 08:58 AM
Looks like the sapwood is about 3 times the thickness of the bark at the upper right corner.

The way the black stain crosses the rings I would guess that there was some steel down lower in that log, not fungus.
I think that these black stains are from the saw blade....
I'd be thinking hard about sawing this into square baulks, and flipping them to orient the grain in a manner that would keep the assembly the most stable, and bolting the whole sandwich together.... A "butcherblock" of White Oak will be much better than a solid chunk of shakey timber....

chuckt
07-03-2012, 10:04 AM
Hmmm. You think that is okay to do for a sternpost? It makes sense to me. Any reason not to do it? Other than expense (which shouldn't be bad)? The prop shaft does go through this piece if that matters.

I think I need a pattern of the sternpost so I can visualize how to orient the piece within the timber.

chuckt
07-03-2012, 10:38 AM
This is the piece I like better for the stern post. I think it is wide enough. Of course, if I do as you suggest Lefty, it does not matter.

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss151/cmeke0870/Concordia/a91bf239.jpg

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss151/cmeke0870/Concordia/a91bf239.jpghttp://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss151/cmeke0870/Concordia/a91bf239.jpg