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Ando
06-18-2012, 03:33 PM
Hi All,

I've recently started building John Gardner's 16ft Swampscott Dory - the revised, widened version taken from his "More Building Classic Small Craft". I started lofting and planning other little things (like finding a shed to build in, sourcing wood, etc.) sometime around Easter this year, and over the past week I've started gluing up White Oak frames. I'm really looking forward to sharing my build with you all, and learning plenty from you in doing so. I'll keep you posted.

Cheers,
Andy.


https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/282312_3770882362028_2121766968_n.jpg
A little hard to see, but there's the frames view.


https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/580104_3770949203699_157822997_n.jpg
Gluing up the first (and beamiest) frame. These are five-piece frames, partly due to the narrow stock I picked up on the cheap, but I reckon it's worked out pretty well.


https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/282312_3770882402029_1297605624_n.jpg
And some wood for further down the track. From left to right, sitting on the lofting boards there's some old Huon Pine panels taken from within a really old place in Hobart (I'll use these for floorboards); two 4x2s of Celery Top (stem, tiller etc.); a few 8to10" wide boards of King Billy Pine (for thwarts, possibly transom); and on the the right, underneath that lump of oregon, two 12" wide boards of Celery Top.

johngsandusky
06-18-2012, 04:43 PM
Cool! Love dories.

TerryLL
06-18-2012, 06:16 PM
Back in the 70s I built the original version of that boat as it is drawn in BCSC. The widened version looks sweet.

Will you be building traditional dory-lap or glued clinker?

timo4352
06-18-2012, 06:19 PM
I'm very interested to see this one come together. I've been thinking about that one for a while now.
Good choice IMO
Tim

Ando
06-18-2012, 06:34 PM
Back in the 70s I built the original version of that boat as it is drawn in BCSC. The widened version looks sweet.

Will you be building traditional dory-lap or glued clinker?

Ah wow. Did you build traditionally? Most, if not all, of the dories Gardner documented/designed are pretty nice-looking boats hey.

I'll be building in glued clinker for this one, but down the track I'd love to build boats the real way.

TerryLL
06-18-2012, 07:53 PM
Ah wow. Did you build traditionally? Most, if not all, of the dories Gardner documented/designed are pretty nice-looking boats hey.

I'll be building in glued clinker for this one, but down the track I'd love to build boats the real way.

I built it batten-seam. Fir ply over doug fir frames with fir battens and the exterior fully fiberglassed. It was my first build and I made about every error I could on the construction, starting with the decision to go with batten-seam. Back then clinker ply was not the popular method it is today, but that's the method I'd use on that dory if I had to do it again.

almeyer
06-18-2012, 09:22 PM
Fair warning, I'll be lurking on this thread, as I've also thought the widened version looked nice. If this is the same one I'm thinking of, it was modified slightly for better sailing. Will you be building a sail rig for it?
Al

Ando
06-19-2012, 03:06 AM
Yep, this'll have a sprit rig, as per the plans, and if need be later on, I can play around with different rigs - Leg O Mutton for example.

Glued up the final frame today, and have made some progress with the stem.

jim_cricket
06-20-2012, 05:29 PM
Hi Ando,
I like this boat, too. 10 or 11 years ago, I started fooling with some ideas for an alternate rig, and a kickup rudder. I would imagine the 72' sprit to be a little small for the boat. The widened vers. has a good deal more bearing, particularly aft, and could handle more area. I think the centerboard arrangement in this boat is a good deal better than that in most trad. dories. Should solve the weather helm problem. The arrangement I drew has sealed tanks in the ends like the Oughtred boats. I'm glad to see someone building this boat! FWIW, here is the drawing I made several years ago.

http://jimluton.com/images/daturaplan_web.jpg

TerryLL
06-20-2012, 05:45 PM
I put a 120sf gaff main and a 30sf jib on my dory. The main had two deep reef bands and I used both on many occasions. The boat had terrible weather helm but was a real performer in light winds. Only dumped it once when I was caught in an accidental jibe. Back then I was sailing the same grounds as McMullen and his home boys do today.

Ando
06-20-2012, 07:19 PM
Hi Ando,
I like this boat, too. 10 or 11 years ago, I started fooling with some ideas for an alternate rig, and a kickup rudder. I would imagine the 72' sprit to be a little small for the boat. The widened vers. has a good deal more bearing, particularly aft, and could handle more area. I think the centerboard arrangement in this boat is a good deal better than that in most trad. dories. Should solve the weather helm problem. The arrangement I drew has sealed tanks in the ends like the Oughtred boats. I'm glad to see someone building this boat! FWIW, here is the drawing I made several years ago.


Thanks for all that info, Jim! Great drawing as well - I was actually planning on having some buoyancy chambers in there as well. My current boat, a Jimmy Skiff that I built last year, has a chamber at either end - really good for storage and peace of mind.

On to the stem today...

jim_cricket
06-20-2012, 08:30 PM
I put a 120sf gaff main and a 30sf jib on my dory. The main had two deep reef bands and I used both on many occasions. The boat had terrible weather helm but was a real performer in light winds. Only dumped it once when I was caught in an accidental jibe. Back then I was sailing the same grounds as McMullen and his home boys do today.

Wow Terry, that's double the area. I do like a healthy rig, and deep reefs, though. The rig I was fooling with has about 86 feet in the standing lug main, and 23 in the jib. My crab skiff Cricket has an 85 foot bermudan una rig, and it gets a reef (when I'm solo) at about 13 or 14. We'll carry on to 15 with two crew. Anyway, here's the prelim. sketch of the dory rig. I didn't take the idea very far before getting sidetracked onto something else, but the intent is there.

http://jimluton.com/images/daturasail_web.jpg
Cricket

johngsandusky
06-22-2012, 09:02 AM
I think my big dory (18'8" x 6'6") has 106sqft. A little low for light winds, wants shortening around 20kts.

MDWatts
06-22-2012, 10:05 AM
This thread has enticed my initial entry to the forum. I'm currently building my shop and plane to build this same boat. I'll be watching with great interest. Thanks for sharing your build.

Ando
06-24-2012, 07:33 AM
Just a little update...

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/545512_3796895092330_404950503_n.jpg
Gluing up the Celery Top stem.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/545512_3796895012328_1852043690_n.jpg

Andy

James Corduan
06-24-2012, 08:37 AM
Andy, what kind of glue are you using on the stem and frames?

Ando
06-24-2012, 03:30 PM
Hi James, I'm using Bote-Cote epoxy - and Australian epoxy - with their high-strength thickening powder mixed in. Am I doing things right?

TerryLL
06-24-2012, 04:03 PM
Andy, I'm a little confused by your stem construction. Typically in a dory this size the stem is cut from a single plank and the foot of the stem mounts right to the bottom.

Also, going back to your frame construction photo, do you plan on using plywood gussets over the glued joints?

WX
06-24-2012, 04:34 PM
Hi James, I'm using Bote-Cote epoxy - and Australian epoxy - with their high-strength thickening powder mixed in. Am I doing things right?
You're doing fine, it won't let go.:)
Wood flour is cheaper though.

James Corduan
06-24-2012, 09:02 PM
Looking good Andy, didn't know you were down under. I just picked up a copy of The Dory Book, so I will be lurking around your thread watching things progress.

Ando
06-24-2012, 11:53 PM
Andy, I'm a little confused by your stem construction. Typically in a dory this size the stem is cut from a single plank and the foot of the stem mounts right to the bottom.

Also, going back to your frame construction photo, do you plan on using plywood gussets over the glued joints?

Hi Terry, the reason I scarphed in that extra piece was to cover the part of the stem that had quite a bit of curve in it - enough that the single scarph joint wasn't going to be enough for the stem. The stem's made up from a 4x2. There won't be any plywood gussets on here either.

TerryLL
06-25-2012, 08:11 AM
Hi Terry, the reason I scarphed in that extra piece was to cover the part of the stem that had quite a bit of curve in it - enough that the single scarph joint wasn't going to be enough for the stem. The stem's made up from a 4x2. There won't be any plywood gussets on here either.

OK.
My reason for asking about the plywood gussets on the frames is because a glue joint on the end grain is usually somewhat weak. On several of his dories Gardner shows the frame connections as mitered joints with gussets.

Ando
07-15-2012, 08:06 AM
Alrighty, the frames and stem are now faired and looking pretty good. Next will be the transom. Photos will come over the next little while.

Cheers,
Andy

James McMullen
07-15-2012, 08:51 AM
I had one of these for a while. An older boat that just needed a little fixing up. But I ended up giving it away since none of us ever really used it much.

http://inlinethumb07.webshots.com/49926/2953601050105767272S600x600Q85.jpg (http://sports.webshots.com/photo/2953601050105767272PPuyEp)

http://inlinethumb41.webshots.com/49960/2211512110105767272S600x600Q85.jpg (http://sports.webshots.com/photo/2211512110105767272DDcRGu)

http://inlinethumb19.webshots.com/46098/2245609790105767272S600x600Q85.jpg (http://sports.webshots.com/photo/2245609790105767272kojmck)

Ando you really, really, really need either some gussets or at least some through-bolts or big-ass screws to reinforce your frame joints. Relying on end-grain glue joints in white oak to hold up long term is an exercise in futility. I would fasten those suckers together as if the glue was merely bedding and the entire strength of the joint was reliant on the fasteners--because guess what? That's exactly how some of those are going to be after a few years of the wetting/drying cycle. Those gussets on Gardner's plans are probably the easiest way to improve your strength there. .

Here's some more pics of a genuine, working dory, a relic of more than a hundred years old from the halibut fishery of the Schooner Wawona. This boat was worked hard, patched and re-patched, and never once babied in her life until she came to our shop to get a fitted cradle for her new life as a museum artifact. Note the frame gussets--a few are grown crooks, but most are plywood:

http://inlinethumb20.webshots.com/50003/2465220040105767272S600x600Q85.jpg (http://news.webshots.com/photo/2465220040105767272FCYYTW)

http://inlinethumb19.webshots.com/48786/2579487860105767272S600x600Q85.jpg (http://news.webshots.com/photo/2579487860105767272tUSUdw)

http://inlinethumb21.webshots.com/45908/2123928990105767272S600x600Q85.jpg (http://news.webshots.com/photo/2123928990105767272xPVjlU)

Outlaw
07-15-2012, 10:22 AM
I think ya should listen. get some gussets on that and all your frames. just my $.01 worth.
will be a nice boat. now get back to buildin.

Outlaw

Ando
07-17-2012, 04:35 AM
Thanks for the photos and advice, James, I'll do something about the frames. Now, why is it that in Oughtred's clinker ply book he shows dory frames without any gussets or fastenings. Is it because he used a more rot-resistant, more stable wood for his frames? I know, I know, Gardner knew dories better than anyone, but I just want to know why Oughtred goes without.

Andy

James McMullen
07-17-2012, 08:24 AM
Oughtred's frames are glued-up laminations of multiple thin strips to conform to the curves that are then sawn out to make the frames, if I remember correctly. A different sort of beast entirely, much more like a natural-grown crook than a pieced frame like you're using.

keyhavenpotterer
07-17-2012, 08:29 AM
'scuse my ingnorance, but can someone tell me why dories have a small transom rather than finish it off double ended? I understand they were designed to be built quick and stacked etc...but was it 'cos they were working off the back and needed a bit more buoyancy there or some other reason...did they work in pairs: one on the oars and another sat at the stern or was it just net and line weight sat aft then run out over the transom? Gardener's Dory book is one of the few I don't have...anyone fill me in on that aspect? Why did they choose that? Its seems almost vestigial, but they did it, must of been needed for its use or production rather than run the planks another few inches out to a straight stern stem?

Ed

TerryLL
07-17-2012, 09:05 AM
'scuse my ingnorance, but can someone tell me why dories have a small transom rather than finish it off double ended? I understand they were designed to be built quick and stacked etc...but was it 'cos they were working off the back and needed a bit more buoyancy there or some other reason...did they work in pairs: one on the oars and another sat at the stern or was it just net and line weight sat aft then run out over the transom? Gardener's Dory book is one of the few I don't have...anyone fill me in on that aspect? Why did they choose that? Its seems almost vestigial, but they did it, must of been needed for its use or production rather than run the planks another few inches out to a straight stern stem?

Ed


I don't know why the traditional dory transom is shaped as it is, but I can tell you that the sharply-raked tombstone transom is a great asset when running downwind in big following seas. The double-ended dories might perform just as well, and would be easier to build.

keyhavenpotterer
07-17-2012, 09:38 AM
I think transoms are more work than stems, which is why I wondered, as they had to be built quick and fast, why go the trouble of the all those angles? Maybe that small transom's just a real nice line holder. Much easier running a line aft than over the stem of a double ender. They were mainly running lines out with multiple hooks on weren't they then pulling them in?

TerryLL
07-17-2012, 10:09 AM
Thanks for the photos and advice, James, I'll do something about the frames. Now, why is it that in Oughtred's clinker ply book he shows dory frames without any gussets or fastenings. Is it because he used a more rot-resistant, more stable wood for his frames? I know, I know, Gardner knew dories better than anyone, but I just want to know why Oughtred goes without.

Andy

I built the Oughtred John Dory a while back and If I recall, the plans showed butted frames with a small knee where the floor and futtock met. Clint Chase uses the same connection on his new dory design.

I went with plywood gussets as shown in Gardner just to be on the safe side. If the thwarts are solidly connected and reinforced with knees, there's little chance that there will be any flexing at the bottom/garboard joint, so extra reinforcement at that joint is probably not needed. But plywood gussets do provide a substantial peace of mind function.

Gib Etheridge
07-17-2012, 10:29 AM
I asked that same question on another thread and never got a reply. I think a tombstone transom is easier to build than a curved stem, but I wouldn't want a transom forward. That's the best I can come up with. I don't remember there being any explanation in any of Gardner's books.

James McMullen
07-17-2012, 02:33 PM
The top of the narrow transom does provide room fora handy sculling notch. But yes, for all intents and purposes, a dory with a narrow raking tombstone is essentially a double-ender in practice.

My pet theory is that it's there mostly to make sure those disreputable cod fishermen would have to put 'em all facing the same way when they stack 'em like dixie cups on the deck of a Banks Schooner. And then it just got retained in the more sophisticated vessels descended from those quick and dirty, expendable boats as a vestigial organ, like our appendix or nipples on men. :D

Breakaway
07-17-2012, 08:52 PM
I wont comment on easier to build( transom or stem). But remember these boats were built in production style, not one-off. They were constructed on jigs and there was probably always a stack of transoms pre-beveled and assembled ready for final fitting.

You wouldn't set a trawl line or over the stern. You'd haul over the side. You might set a trawl over the transom, but more likely you's drop the trawl anchor, stream the line over the quarter and row out to to til the bouy got tossed over.( perhaps just belaying the trawl to the dory itself instead of a bouy and waiting awhile before hauling back the line).

That's how I'da dood it :)

Kevin

Gib Etheridge
07-17-2012, 09:06 PM
Quote....."That's how I'da dood it".

That's how I'da did it.

FTFY Dude.

Ando
08-05-2012, 01:22 AM
Thanks for your thoughts on gussets and everything else dory related. Here's where I'm up to now. And I think I'll add gussets if the need arises down the track (based on the experience of a boatbuilder friend of mine). Enjoy.

Ando

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/s720x720/527114_3982283646928_272071458_n.jpg
Looking forward.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/s720x720/527114_3982283686929_1563504509_n.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/s720x720/527114_3982283726930_444224869_n.jpg
Where the stem will be. Still working out how best to attach it to the ladder frame.

TerryLL
08-05-2012, 08:48 AM
...Here's where I'm up to now. And I think I'll add gussets if the need arises down the track....

I think those frames as built are a real problem. I doubt the epoxy will let go, but the wood will likely split off at the thin end grain. I would definitely add gussets on both sides of those joints before the frames are beveled. The gussets on the aft side of the forward frames, and the gussets on the forward side of the aft frames should be cut a bit oversize so when beveled they meet the hull planking.

Gib Etheridge
08-05-2012, 11:55 AM
It's true, you need to reinforce those joints in the framing. Big screws form the inside and outside would help, glued and screwed gussets would be better. It will be much easier to add the gussets now, and impossible to add the outside screws once it's planked. Once the joints have failed you will have an awful time pulling them tight in order to add gussets.

Here's how I attached my stems to the ladder frame. The head of the stem is clamped to a block and the heel is set into pocket at the top of a braced post. Frame number 1 is then braced to the post as well. It works perfectly.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7131/7718309418_b5c93d5a34_z.jpg

TerryLL
08-05-2012, 01:15 PM
Another connection option for mounting the stem on the frame:

http://i325.photobucket.com/albums/k365/TerryLava/2010%20CY%20Build/Forestem1.jpg?t=1293587517


http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?124371-New-Build-Caledonia-Yawl&highlight=

Ando
09-03-2012, 05:48 AM
Hi again, It's been a while since I last posted, and some photos will come in the coming days. Gib, I ended up going with a support for the stem kinda similar to yours, but thanks Terry for the suggestion as well. Up to this point, the frames, stem and transom (and it's obviously built now) are pretty close to fully faired (what a process with those frames of mine!). 3/8" Gaboon ply was delivered today - some scarphing to come next, then on goes the bottom!

Photos to come.

Andy

Gib Etheridge
09-03-2012, 11:34 AM
Looking forward to the photos Ando. That's going to be a pretty boat. Now that you've got the bevels done it would be a good time to add screws to those glued frame joints. Don't forget the limbers! :ycool:

Ando
09-04-2012, 03:20 AM
Here we go:

Transom, made up from two different boards, with the outer two pieces being cut from the same original board, get me?
https://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/200503_4105673211590_1022733490_n.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/395196_4105673771604_814636885_n.jpg

Celery top stem.
https://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/548247_4105677691702_1387963460_n.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/429948_4105679251741_639000205_n.jpg

King Billy Pine for the transom, Celery Top for the knee.
https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/383185_4105680331768_502766889_n.jpg

Ando
10-08-2012, 10:42 PM
Hi all,

just thought I'd add a few more photos to show where I'm currently up to. And I've struck a bit of a problem with trying to get the first garboard on - it's really hard to bend the aft end of the plank against the transom. I don't know if it's an issue with the positioning of the fourth frame (too far aft), or if the design just turned out this way; on that note, does anyone know of this boat being built before? The garboard fits pretty sweet along the rest of the boat, including the stem. Got any ideas?

https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/564061_4261552948486_343832644_n.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/r90/560569_4261556628578_1229001010_n.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/543429_4261555668554_881855686_n.jpg
I'm pushing down pretty hard on that, and it still doesn't touch. Do I take off more on that frame in front of the transom?

https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/r90/485852_4261554148516_1760270559_n.jpg
That's how the planks lies without any force on it.


Thanks,
Andy

TerryLL
10-08-2012, 11:47 PM
I can't tell if there is a problem here or not. If the last frame is in the right position, and if the transom is mounted at the right angle, and if the bevels are all cut so a batten lies fair upon them, and if the GBD lies down without a hump (albeit with force required), then you are likely good to go. The GBD does have twist at the ends and will resist to some degee, but that's normal. Don't expect the GBD to lie down flat on the transom without being coerced. It's not unusual for GBD ends to require steaming to get them to behave.

Is that 9mm meranti you're using on the GBD?

Gib Etheridge
10-09-2012, 12:44 AM
Looks good to me too. Keep the pictures coming. Your joinery is impressive.

andrewpatrol
10-09-2012, 01:53 AM
Hi Ando, try some towels and boiling water on that ply. They are often difficult and feel like the're gonna break.

Ando
10-09-2012, 02:13 AM
Terry, thanks for the reassurance and advice, much appreciated. It is 9mm (3/8") gaboon - The rest of the planking will be the same, as per Gardner's suggestion.

Thanks Gib, will do!

Andrew, I'll give it shot, and test it on some scrap ply first, thanks for the tip.


I'll report back with how it all goes. Thanks fellas.

Gib Etheridge
10-09-2012, 02:48 AM
Here's an idea for you.

Get a friend to help hold it in nice and snug. If you can hold it as well as you did in the photo with just one hand 2 people shoud have no trouble getting it all the way in.

If you like the fit and if it's fair over the last frame drill pilot screw holes for the grbrd to transom joint. Then take it off and clamp a vertical batten over the screw holes and drill through the batten from the inside, using the screw holes as guides. When you glue the grbrd on use longer temporary screws and go through the batten. This will disperse any point loads until the glue cures. If you put the screws through the batten and grbrd so that they are just flush on the inner face of the plank they will hold the batten in place while you pull it in.

Ando
10-09-2012, 05:22 AM
That makes a lot of sense, thanks Gib. I'm a lot more hopeful about this plank after the last few posts, thanks! I'm really hoping to get the boat planked by the end of the year, but we'll see how it all goes. I'm commencing an apprenticeship as a shipwright in about a month, so I'll be a little shorter on time than I am at the moment, but I can't really complain about that now can I?!

mdh
10-09-2012, 05:39 AM
Looks good, you swapped the solid bottom for plywood? Will there be a double or wear strips?

TerryLL
10-09-2012, 08:03 AM
Andy,

If getting that GBD down requires really a lot of force, then it might be a good idea to do both GBDs at the same time, in order to distribute the stress evenly from both sides.

You might try clamping a board onto the aft section of the GBD, between the last frame and the transom, say about 4-6 feet long, and sticking out the back of the boat. Then use this as a long lever arm to pull the mating surfaces together where the plank meets the transom.

BrianM
10-09-2012, 12:06 PM
'scuse my ingnorance, but can someone tell me why dories have a small transom rather than finish it off double ended? I understand they were designed to be built quick and stacked etc...but was it 'cos they were working off the back and needed a bit more buoyancy there or some other reason...did they work in pairs: one on the oars and another sat at the stern or was it just net and line weight sat aft then run out over the transom? Gardener's Dory book is one of the few I don't have...anyone fill me in on that aspect? Why did they choose that? Its seems almost vestigial, but they did it, must of been needed for its use or production rather than run the planks another few inches out to a straight stern stem?

Ed

Everything about (Bank)dories is simple, inexpensive, functional, and for a purpose.

The tombstone transom (Vs building a double-ender) is very easy to build, gives the boat a Bow and Stern, and more importantly, is easy as pie to cut a notch in to receive the critical sweep oar (used when sailing or in surf).

Double enders with Sweep oars need a reinforced rail and an oarlock and socket.

Ando
10-09-2012, 04:38 PM
mdh - Yeah I went with the plywood bottom, it was easier for me. I've seen another plywood dory (around 13ft, built a lot lighter) with a batten running down the CL with a brass half oval on top of that, so maybe that might be the way I go with it.

Ando
10-09-2012, 04:42 PM
Terry, you're a genius. I was looking for that sort of leverage, and you've provided the answer for me! Thanks mate, I'll definitely have a go at that.

JayInOz
10-09-2012, 05:47 PM
Keep the pictures coming Andy! And congrats on the apprenticeship mate- people here will be asking you for advice in a year or three:) JayInOz

Ando
10-16-2012, 08:15 PM
Well, with the advice you all gave me, I got that garboard on with no problems at all. I used a board for leverage, and then some shores from the roof, just as drawn in The Dory Book. Here's a few photos. Enjoy

https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/426349_4294281126670_963361527_n.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/580740_4294283086719_1428820259_n.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/431730_4294288086844_2097150552_n.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/481064_4294289926890_1728023825_n.jpg

Andy

skaraborgcraft
10-17-2012, 03:29 AM
I do notice despite all the advice suggesting it, you have not put any gussets on your frames. Are you going to fit them after planking or run the risk of going without? Nice design, look forward to progress.

Ando
10-17-2012, 06:04 AM
I'm going to risk it. Glued epoxy planking really should act as the biggest gusset I think. If the frames do ever split or come apart, I'll tend to the problem with gussets at that point. And yes, it's a lovely design to my eye as well.

Ando
11-01-2012, 01:44 AM
Both garboards are on! Glad to finally be able to say that! Enjoy.

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Andy

andrewpatrol
11-01-2012, 02:41 AM
Gday Ando, Good to see a corry shed, love em. A minor point that may help, when you put shores from the roof put another opposing one so the hull doesnt get pushed outta shape. Also put some plastic between those blocks for the clamps and frames otherwise you'll stick em fast. Glad you got the Gboards on I'm slowly working up the courage for mine. Well done
Andrew

Ando
11-01-2012, 06:09 AM
Their downside is that they get real cold in the winter, and super hot in the summer - it's been in the 30s this week in Sydney, but scorching in my shed! Maybe I just need to man up. The epoxy goes off pretty quick in that heat too.

Thanks for the shoring idea, I hadn't really thought of it. I'll be sure to do it for the rest of the planks. Ah yes, I checked and made sure that there wasn't any epoxy touching the clamps, but thanks for the reminder. I also find greaseproof paper to be really good for that sort of thing. I use it when I'm doing scarph joints. It takes a bit to make the plunge and get them on, I know what you mean. I fiddled for a couple of days with each of these garboards, doing dry fits, but that meant that when it came to gluing the garbd, they both went on pretty sweet. Go for it!

Andy

Ando
02-11-2013, 05:01 AM
Hello! Updates and progress have been slow, and they might continue to be, but I thought I'd just drop you a line as to where I'm currently at.

There are now two planks on either side, with the third ones nearly ready to go. I think I'll start work on spars, rudder and anything else I can get on with after work.

Andy

Ando
03-24-2013, 01:03 AM
This is where I've been up to for a while now, but I'm having trouble fitting the next planks. I think that some of the frames are a touch under (small, that is), which is causing an unfair curve in the plank when I clamp them on. I might glue a packer piece and refair certain frames. I can't think of how else to do it!

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johngsandusky
03-25-2013, 09:09 AM
Thanks for the update.