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View Full Version : Let's discuss Cloud computing, personal privacy and control of our digital assets



Ted Hoppe
06-18-2012, 02:24 PM
Cloud Computing represents one of the most significant shifts in information technology many of us arelikely to see in our lifetimes. Reaching the point where computing functions as a utility has great potential, promising innovations we cannot yet imagine. yet there are some seriously dark implications to our own access and privacy due to these changes

the corporations that traditionally have controlled our data have shown very little concern about our personal data management, the migration to accessible long term storage and even our privacy in the cyber world. they report via paid researchers who are determined to fire up investors that the customers are both excited and just a little nervous at the prospects of Cloud Computing. These corporations are excited by the opportunities to reduce capital costs while farming increased service fees from thier customers. They are also excited for a chance to divest themselves of infrastructure management, and focus on core competencies of short term profitability. Most of all, they are excited by the agility offered by the on-demand provisioning of computing and the ability to align information technology with business strategies and needs more readily - these rarely have bode well for the consumer in the past in other data migrations. Interestingly enough, the customers in the know themselves have downplay about the risks of Cloud Computing not being properly secured, and the loss of direct control over thier own data, and the cost associated for a third party to store these things indefinitely.. And if by chance lose your data in this migration, how can a corporation put value on your children's lost photographs, a family video, a meaningful college paper or even tax returns stored in cyberspace for save keeping? serious question to which there is no good answer.

computers are changing as we use more tablets and smart phones instead. apple has decided that the optical disk is being removed from most new machines next year to move you to pay 99 dollars a year in fees. although portable hard drives are still available for the time being by 2014 most everyone on this forum will have migrated to a cloud computing world. things will be different. One thing for sure, there will be many more who will have access to review your data and as many will have the power to corrupt and delete it to.

Kaa
06-18-2012, 02:27 PM
Cloud Computing represents one of the most significant shifts in information technology many of us arelikely to see in our lifetimes.

I have strong doubts about that :-D


...by 2014 most everyone on this forum will have migrated to a cloud computing world.

I have very strong doubts about that, too.

Kaa

mikefrommontana
06-18-2012, 02:38 PM
From a national security perspective, I qualify cloud computing as one of the most foolish ideas to come along in a long time. What sort of backup protocols are there for all this data--none? All it takes is one bombing of a server farm or a out of control Stuxnet or Flame virus to wreak incredible amounts of damage, while individuals and corporations rapidly scrap out backup technologies in favor of profit.

Control your data... control your life!

Kaa
06-18-2012, 02:42 PM
What sort of backup protocols are there for all this data--none?

Business-standard backup protocols generally involve three backup copies, at least one of those at a physically remote location (preferably a couple of thousand miles away).

Kaa

Paul Pless
06-18-2012, 02:52 PM
Business-standard backup protocols generally involve three backup copies, at least one of those at a physically remote location (preferably a couple of thousand miles away).

Kaa

Most of my clients contractually require me to follow the above standard: Three backups with either daily or weekly updates to both my own back up system as well as to them. Most clients also require this to be documented. Everybody seems to be on the same page.

Tom Montgomery
06-18-2012, 05:05 PM
.
Steve Jobs discussing cloud computing for the rest of us 15 years ago. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Or7zaUaP-J8&feature=youtube_gdata_player)

elf
06-18-2012, 05:37 PM
No thanks. Just wait 'til the day when the power is on erratically or only 6 hours a day.

ccmanuals
06-18-2012, 05:49 PM
Cloud computing is here to stay and will become more prevalent. NASA just migrated all their storage requirements to cloud computing to include all space images. One can only image the vast amounts of storage required by them. Rackspace which is headquartered in San Antonio is adding business clients every day. This is especially significant for small business because with cloud computing they don't have to worry about security, patching, licensing, hardware, software, administration and backup for their storage needs.

Tom Montgomery
06-18-2012, 05:55 PM
No thanks. Just wait 'til the day when the power is on erratically or only 6 hours a day.

Hmmm....

Do you think someone is going to pre-empt us?

Tom Montgomery
06-18-2012, 05:58 PM
I uploaded my entire music library to the Apple cloud a month ago. That frees up a LOT of space on my iPhone and iPad for other things. ;)

Glen Longino
06-18-2012, 06:37 PM
Are you people crazy?
I have a long juniper stick with notches cut in it that records All my data!
Call me Archaic!;)

skuthorp
06-18-2012, 08:21 PM
Huh, my music archive is mostly on LP's in the 'shop!
As I've said before, a prospective police state would not need a secret police, all the information they'll ever need has been volunteered already.

purri
06-19-2012, 02:35 AM
Zackery. I'm certainly not about to embrace the concept if there are ANY alternatives. FWIW I don't even do EFT of any form from my system.

John Smith
06-19-2012, 06:32 AM
I'm not sure that 'cloud computing' is really anything more than an extension of what corporations have been able to do, via the net, for a long time. Sure, more personal information will end up on servers where it is possible that corporation will be 'mining' more aggressively than they have before.... but by and large, the ones inclined to do this are already doing this, with varying degrees of success.

For example, Amazon's Kindle results in Amazon knowing a great deal about your tastes and interests. So far, the execution hasn't been as impressive as the data-gathering. For example, I downloaded one WWII avaition history book... and ever since then, Amazon has been touting me on additional aviation history books, even though I'm not especially likely to download any more. If I downloaded a cookbook, I'd be deluged with touts for cookbooks.... and so on.

Eventually, the market gets overloaded or saturated, the pitches become less and less effective, and the intensity wanes.

In other words, I'm not especially worried.

I'm not sure that is necessarily a bad thing. If I'm going to get ads anyway, its a good thing they are about products I'm interested in.