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Hugh Conway
06-14-2012, 08:08 PM
So here's a build report for building an Atkinson Traveler Canoe in Wood Canvas. I'm about to Canvas it so up until that point will be relatively quick. Pictures are of varying quality.

First step: Build the mold. Not many pictures for that. Plywood composite beam to lay things out on, Plywood stations. Planking on the mold is 18mm good quality Baltic Birch plywood ripped to 3/4" wide. Attached with drywall nails, fair mold with a longboard to templates drawn from offsets. Cover mold with thinned linseed oil. Next mark out and add 2.5" wide galvanized steel bands (very helpful to have the source chop with a brake, my supplier charge $20 to cut a 4'x10' sheet). Attach bands with #6 stainless 3/4" FH screws. Installed inwale backers of steam bent oak. Wrap mold in Saran Wrap to prep for rib bending

Hugh Conway
06-14-2012, 09:54 PM
Here's the mold and strongback (a 2*6 planned flat and jointed)
http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u415/thehughconway/IMG_0319.jpg
(note the pile of ribs in the background. ribstock's Alaskan Yellow Cedar)
Stems are steam bent rift sawn white oak - steamer and mold shown. Took a days+ soaking to get a high enough moisture content for successful bending.
http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u415/thehughconway/IMG_0301.jpg
Inwales are bent Sitka Spruce; no steaming.

Slowly ribbing the boat (again, ribs are soaked, stock was quite dry). The secondary strongbacks keep things snugged:
http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u415/thehughconway/IMG_0327.jpg

Hugh Conway
06-14-2012, 10:03 PM
more ribs:
http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u415/thehughconway/IMG_0332.jpg

faired ribs with planking stock (western red cedar). Found 20' pieces of clear WRC so a number of the planks are single, continuous, for the length of the canoe.
http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u415/thehughconway/IMG_0335.jpg

canoe mostly planked
http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u415/thehughconway/IMG_0336.jpg

canoe off mold with decks installed (sorry, few pics in between). Decks are 8/4 gen mahogany cut down to 4/4 with a crest. Inlay is Holly.
http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u415/thehughconway/IMG_0372.jpg

half ribs were added (pictures of half ribs will be added). Then everything was clenched and the planking wetted to remove the dents. Plastic sheet to reduce evaporation
http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u415/thehughconway/IMG_0429.jpg

Fitz
06-15-2012, 08:19 AM
Very nice. Thanks for sharing!

Fitz

DDan
04-11-2013, 08:45 AM
Nice post. I just bought plans - hope to get started in next few months.

skaraborgcraft
04-11-2013, 10:53 AM
Please excuse my absolute ignorance of this method, but why are you covering it with canvas? Are the planks you fitted not there for the purpose of keeping the water out? I built an old Percy Blandford double kayak that was canvas covered, that had stringers bent around plywood frames. Is this canoe going to be treated to such a rough life (rapids maybe) that it needs all that framing , timber skin AND canvas?? Lovely craft.

Cuyahoga Chuck
04-11-2013, 12:19 PM
Please excuse my absolute ignorance of this method, but why are you covering it with canvas? Are the planks you fitted not there for the purpose of keeping the water out? I built an old Percy Blandford double kayak that was canvas covered, that had stringers bent around plywood frames. Is this canoe going to be treated to such a rough life (rapids maybe) that it needs all that framing , timber skin AND canvas?? Lovely craft.

As you see the wood-canvas canoe is built in layers. The hull gives shape and rigidity but is not tight against water penetration. The canvas which is treated with a filler compound (they used to use white lead to fill the weave) and paint becomes the water barrier.
The wood-canvas has numerous advantages. Because of all the steps required it can be built using assembly-line methods. Altho' that approach is long gone. You don't need long pristeen lengths of the most desirable lumber. And they can be repaired/revitalized over and over.
The disadvantage is you have to have a mold. The mold has to be precise and it has to be sturdy because it suffers from thousands of hammer blows when the planks are nailed to the ribs. Each mold only makes one design and it is one hell of a lot of work to build one if you only desire a single hull. Nonetheless I appluad those that do it.
But a newly built wood-canvas certainly is pretty and they maintain their charm well if cared for.
Thanks for mentioning Percy Blandford. He deserves more mention than he gets. His designs were not sexy by our standards but were well engineered and sturdy. They are still selling those plans.

Hugh Conway
04-11-2013, 08:32 PM
Nice post. I just bought plans - hope to get started in next few months.

In retrospect the plans would have been a good purchase. Ended up with the suite of Stelmok books (Building the Maine Guide Canoe, Wood Canvas Canoes, Seliga Canoes) his Wooden Boat articles and hybridized between them. Plans would have saved time. Best of luck! For supplies the form was birch plywood; a single 4'*10' sheet of sheet metal was enough to produce the strips to cover the mold, the sheet metal shop used a press brake for an extra $20 to turn it into strips. money well spent. For canoe stuff DB Gurney sells canoe tacks; Canvas was purchased en bulk from an online tenting supply shop; filler can be made yourself; Marshall's Cover white primer and gloss paint; Northwoods Canoe company for various bolts, tacks, stembands, clinching iron. etc.

skaraborgcraft - Cuyahoga Chuck covered it well. By production total man hours for an old town as far as I can tell from build sheets was less a we ek maybe? They turned them out quick. This shops slower but canoe #2 (ribbed on the form) is much quicker than #1. The planking isn't watertight - WCBG standards are <1/16" gap between planks so definitely not watertight.

Adding some more to this build:
http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u415/thehughconway/979e2d11-06d6-4f53-9c02-a8480d9b8df8.jpg
rough tools for stretching canvas - canvas clamps (made from HD doug fir), flat pliers (locking would have saved the wrists), staple gun (the stock arrow didn't penetrate enough - changed up to a powered Stanley model).

http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u415/thehughconway/936492b2-74c4-46a6-9ba6-e37d048cda06.jpg
used a basketball backboard and a car to anchor the two clamps and stretch it upside down on saw horses. Worked well; be careful of rocking saw horses and it's probably more fiddly, but more flexible

http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u415/thehughconway/photo3.jpg
lightly singed canvas

http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u415/thehughconway/photo4.jpg
filled canoe. Used the WCHA filler recipe. No cuprinol used (the books recommend clear cuprinol, no longer available, testing of cut cuprinol substitute bleed out on the canvas; didn't like the cuprinol cut in the filler)

DDan
02-19-2014, 03:47 PM
How did your canoe turn out?

I am just now building my form. Question: How did you attach the strongback to the form? The plans show a form constructed with just a 2x8 laid flat at the bottom of the form (top of the canoe), without the 2x _ on edge at the top of the form that some forms have. The latter makes it easier to attach the strongback. I can imagine running thread-rod all the way down to the flat 2x8 (7 1/2" x 4" plywood box, in my case), bridging some of the molds with 2x4s along the center line, or using plates on the underside of the stealer planks to spread the load out a bit. I took a class at the WoodenBoat School with Jerry Stelmok some years ago, I just don't remember how much force is on that strongback once you have the ribs in place.

Peerie Maa
02-19-2014, 04:44 PM
Please excuse my absolute ignorance of this method, but why are you covering it with canvas? Are the planks you fitted not there for the purpose of keeping the water out? I built an old Percy Blandford double kayak that was canvas covered, that had stringers bent around plywood frames. Is this canoe going to be treated to such a rough life (rapids maybe) that it needs all that framing , timber skin AND canvas?? Lovely craft.

As I see it it is a way to build a birch bark canoe when you can't find good birch bark and spruce roots. ;)

Hugh Conway
02-19-2014, 04:46 PM
It's a roughly 8"*8" square beam from a sheet of 3/4" plywood(as shown in "Building Outrigger Canoes") that's just long enough for the two end stations to be directly connected to the ends. The other stations are notched and glued and screwed to 2" or so wood blocks which are glued and screwed to the beam. The top vertical strongback beam is let into each station, then diagonally braced against each station with chopped 2*6". glued and screwed. Maybe it's overkill, dunno. not that much strain, I don't think, especially with a slow build pace like mine, but the planks are nailed to ribs and clenched by the metal bands it so there's a fair bit of jostling . Had to inlet a little into the beam at the ends to fit the inwale backer (oak) and I should have better designed the stations to fit the bottom retaining ledges (which I made of birch scraps). C-clamps to attach the inwale to the inwale backer worked fine enough; cockamamie scheme to do it differently didn't work as well.


:) well, churn out birchbarks by the thousands ;)

Peerie Maa
02-19-2014, 06:22 PM
^ I certainly do admire the detail of the decks.