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Jlaup
06-03-2012, 06:41 PM
I want to put oar locks on my Alden Indian. The coamings are lowish and the side decks about 8 inches. So the oar locks need to look like the ones Wm. Garden designed on his Eel. Any idea if there is a commercial supplier, or do I have to custom fabricate?

Jamie Orr
06-03-2012, 07:14 PM
Bristol Bronze makes some. Shaw and Tenney might, or you could ask Port Townsend Foundry - they'd custom cast a pair, I'm sure, but it would probably cost a lot.

Jamie

PS I'm sure someone will suggest casting your own but that's out of my league.

Ben Fuller
06-03-2012, 07:17 PM
Nicest ones out there are the ones by Walt Simmons. Ducktrap Maine.

Or you can DIY. 1/2 inside diameter pipe, with locks dropped in them.

Ben

Jlaup
06-03-2012, 07:34 PM
Lordy, those Ducktrap ones are spendy! Also have a 3/4" shank. Makes sense why they need to be beefy, though. I'd have to put an oak pad on the outside of the coamings and under the side decks. Then sink a 3/4" i.d. pipe though the pad, deck, and blocking. Make sense? And, no I'm not Jim Ledger and not going into amateur bronze casting.

Gib Etheridge
06-03-2012, 08:07 PM
Could you laminate up some outriggers that come up from the inner face of the coaming, maybe something along these lines? This picture is from an old forum thread.

http://www.luckhardt.com/oar-outrigger1.jpg

Ben Fuller
06-04-2012, 05:15 AM
Lordy, those Ducktrap ones are spendy! Also have a 3/4" shank. Makes sense why they need to be beefy, though. I'd have to put an oak pad on the outside of the coamings and under the side decks. Then sink a 3/4" i.d. pipe though the pad, deck, and blocking. Make sense? And, no I'm not Jim Ledger and not going into amateur bronze casting.

Yeah, they are expensive, but think about it as a percent of boat investment. I think Rushton used to charge 5 dollars for a set of bronze outriggers for a 100 dollar boat. That boat is now 7 or 8k, the outriggers are not up by the same percentage. The locks will be around long after you and I are gone.The pipe approach is just right. Given the weight of the Indian, and the leverage on the locks, you will want the beef.

skuthorp
06-04-2012, 07:09 AM
I just use spacers to raise the long shank oarlocks from a normal flush fitting to clear the cockpit combing. Brass or copper tube with a bit of thread on one end, a plumbing fitting and a rubber grommet. Cheap and easily replaceable.

johnw
06-04-2012, 01:07 PM
Could you build high enough wooden supports for the oarlocks?

The Bristol Bay gillnetter at the Center for Wooden Boats has the oarlocks in wooden pieces that raise them six inches.

Jlaup
06-04-2012, 02:44 PM
Could you build high enough wooden supports for the oarlocks?

The Bristol Bay gillnetter at the Center for Wooden Boats has the oarlocks in wooden pieces that raise them six inches.

Are wooden pieces removable? If not, seems like they would foul sheets. If removable, I'd want them outside the coaming so I wouldn't lean back on the brackets. Then I need to figure out how to keep the water out of the bilge and not pooling.

johnw
06-04-2012, 03:18 PM
They are outside the coaming, they drain outside the coaming and above the deck, and they have a rounded shape, sort of like you'd make for a knee. Sort of like a taller and bulkier version of this:

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4065/4541004222_c6efbd4ed8.jpg

Jlaup
06-04-2012, 03:42 PM
This the actual scene of the application:

http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6044/6228005830_017129d372.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083746@N02/6228005830/) Side view w/coaming (http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083746@N02/6228005830/) by jlaupheimer (http://www.flickr.com/people/22083746@N02/), on Flickr

I need to lean against the inside of the coaming while sailing and also not have anything permanent that sits too high and fouls the mainsheet.

Gold Rock
06-04-2012, 04:36 PM
I can tell you for a fact that Port Townsend Foundry can do 'em for you. I made patterns for a couple of different sizes when I worked there once upon a time.

Bob Smalser
06-04-2012, 05:58 PM
http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3075025/381607364.jpg

Blocks for winch and oarlock.

Just insure the blocks are connected downward to the deck framing by drifts for strength.

johnw
06-04-2012, 07:33 PM
This the actual scene of the application:

http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6044/6228005830_017129d372.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083746@N02/6228005830/) Side view w/coaming (http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083746@N02/6228005830/) by jlaupheimer (http://www.flickr.com/people/22083746@N02/), on Flickr

I need to lean against the inside of the coaming while sailing and also not have anything permanent that sits too high and fouls the mainsheet.

So, if the wooden block for mounting the oarlock is high enough, drains above the deck and is outside the coaming, it should work. That's actually not so different from the Bristol Bay boat.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/14165560@N07/1765135691/lightbox/

dredbob
06-04-2012, 07:58 PM
Look up some pictures of old sneakboxes and duck hunting skiffs. They were low sided and also had a high coaming set well inboard of the deck edge, so they used folding wooden risers that lay flat on the deck until needed, but then folded up to give the locks the height and spread that was needed for efficient rowing.

I believe that there may be illustrations in Chapelle, but I'm not sure, but they are common on that style of gunning boat.

Bob

Gold Rock
06-04-2012, 09:01 PM
Hmm, let me qualify: the oarlocks I refered to are merely raised or extended ones such as you would drop into a conventional socket. I pulled out my copy of Garden's designs and the image I see of an oarlock on Eel looks like it's supported by a triangulated brace of some arrangement on the outside of the coming. PT foundry does not have patterns to produce such a thing exactly that I'm aware of. All can be had for a price however, natch.

Dave Diefenderfer
06-05-2012, 08:53 AM
Here is what I installed on my sneakbox:
https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/31309_1469280178263_7563460_n.jpg

2" mahogany, bottom shapped to match pitch of the side decks, so they stand perpendicular to horizon. A pr of SS lag bolts installed from below, and thickened epoxy hold them very secure. I use them as a hand hold getting into and out of the boat in waders.

The fold down style are less rigid, though more traditional. I have not sailed my sneakbox with these oar locks yet, but don't think they will be in the way with my simple sprit rig running the main halyard off the tiller head.

Dave

Dave Diefenderfer
06-05-2012, 09:06 AM
How about these?

Shaw and Tenny
http://www.shawandtenney.com/images/outrigger-oarlock-lg.jpg

Dave Diefenderfer
06-05-2012, 09:27 AM
Another option is a neat design I saw at the Tuckerton Seaport Museum. It used a lock similar to what I build, but it was set up with a dovetail on the bottom that slide into a set of dovetail rails that were also tapered to capture it. They were placed so that rowing pressure forced the lock into the taper making it tighter. I played around with this design in some scrap wood, but decided to go fixed as I use the oar locks as a mounting location for my decoy boards on the rear deck too. This would minimize your above deck obstructions for sailing, but you could install the locks when you wanted to row.

Dave

Gerarddm
06-05-2012, 09:39 AM
Dave, those pads look sorta architectural. And permanent.

If the budget is not there for the Ducktrap oar locks, then cobble up some home brewed ones, it shouldn't be that hard.

JOBBER
06-08-2012, 06:58 PM
Not fancy but... http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/12/projects/ecpdr4/index2.html
Rather than the galvanized conduit, 1/2" or 3/4" Sch10 316ss pipe would probably be stronger and less susceptible to salt water corrosion. Stainless also work hardens easily. The bending would do the overall piece, and rowing would locally harden at the hole.