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Rum_Pirate
05-08-2012, 02:48 PM
Anyone know what and where this aircraft is, and if it is still airworthy?


http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd80/Rum_Pirate/2SwordfishApril2012.jpg

Paul Pless
05-08-2012, 03:11 PM
no torpedo?

John B
05-08-2012, 03:19 PM
That'll leave a (bis) mark.

Rum_Pirate
05-08-2012, 03:20 PM
no torpedo?

Apparently it's being serviced.

But where is it and is it still airworthy?

A further hint for others

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http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd80/Rum_Pirate/1SwordfishApril2012.jpg

Hwyl
05-08-2012, 03:43 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairey_Swordfish#Surviving_Aircraft

switters
05-08-2012, 03:57 PM
It is in the hangar and it is not air worthy right now but will be when they are done servicing it.

What did I win?

Rum_Pirate
05-08-2012, 04:00 PM
I had a great time last month at the Royal Naval Air Station at Yeovilton, aka HMS Heron.

I was privileged to be shown around the hanger (not open to the public) and see and tough this magnificent aircraft and others being serviced there in preparation for taking part (yes fling) in an Air show.

In my younger days, (before the dope addicts started using the glue for getting high) I built several Fairey Swordfish "Stringbag' from Airfix kits.
http://www.kitkrazy.com/images/items/a50133-3d.jpg

In the background, of the first picture in this thread, is a Sea Fury.
The engine has just been rebuilt and was on the ground about to be refitted and then be re-certified.

Cuyahoga Chuck
05-08-2012, 04:07 PM
Fairy Swordfish. Very important to British capabilities in WWII. I'm certain the Brits have one or two still servicable but I have no idea about the one in the pic.

Rum_Pirate
05-08-2012, 04:15 PM
The one in the picture is airworthy and does fly in airshows.

I was told the the pilots all land with huge grins after flying them.

I'd live to have a flight in one.

Paul Pless
05-08-2012, 04:22 PM
I'd live to have a flight in one.My most memorable flight ever was in a friend's open cockpit Waco with a big radial engine. The light aerobatics were cool, but the best part was flying low and slow down a river valley as the sun was setting.

Cuyahoga Chuck
05-08-2012, 04:41 PM
One of the most outstanding Swordfish pilots was a reserve officer named Charles Lamb. Very late in his life he wrote a memior called "To War in a Stringbag". He claims to have developed a defensive manuever that allowed him to bring down three opponents without using gunfire. Unfortuately one was a shipmate in a mock dogfight. Later in North Africa he did it again when he was attacked simultaneously by two Fiat CR 42 fighterplanes. The enemies overshot him and collided. Because he had not fired his machinegun he couldn't claim a kill.

Paul Pless
05-08-2012, 04:46 PM
Against the Bismark they flew so low and so slow that the Bismark's anti aircraft guns were unable to depress low enough to engage them.

Rum_Pirate
05-08-2012, 04:54 PM
Against the Bismark they flew so low and so slow that the Bismark's anti aircraft guns were unable to depress low enough to engage them.


Interesting read here
http://www.bismarck-class.dk/bismarck/history/bisfataltorpedohit.html

Ron Williamson
05-08-2012, 07:53 PM
Against the Bismark they flew so low and so slow that the Bismark's anti aircraft guns were unable to depress low enough to engage them.

IIRC,the gunners also led them a bit too much because of the slow speed.

I second the recommendation of To War in a Stringbag.I can see my copy from here.
R

Nicholas Scheuer
05-08-2012, 08:44 PM
I've seen the "Stringbag" suspended from the ceiling at the museum at Santa Momica. from a position on the balcony the aircrat is right in front of the viewer.

The Bigfella
05-08-2012, 09:30 PM
One of the most outstanding Swordfish pilots was a reserve officer named Charles Lamb. Very late in his life he wrote a memior called "To War in a Stringbag". He claims to have developed a defensive manuever that allowed him to bring down three opponents without using gunfire. Unfortuately one was a shipmate in a mock dogfight. Later in North Africa he did it again when he was attacked simultaneously by two Fiat CR 42 fighterplanes. The enemies overshot him and collided. Because he had not fired his machinegun he couldn't claim a kill.

I was a guest at a Rotary dinner 10-12 years ago and when the planned speaker didn't show, one of the members, a former Luftwaffe pilot from the Eastern front gave an impromtu talk on his experiences. His plane had just been serviced and he took it up over the field for a very quick check flight. He was bounced by two Russians - but his guns weren't armed, so he headed into the clouds. The Russians chased him, collided and both went down.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
05-09-2012, 03:46 AM
http://www.fleetairarmarchive.net/aircraft/preserved/swordfish.html