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bobbys
04-26-2012, 12:47 AM
I only made fried chicken once.

I followed Martha Stewards recipe to a T ..

This was before she took on a fake English accent.

Used a cast iron pan and i pulled it off..

Next time i did shortcuts and ruined it

I have a hankering for fried chicken.

Its not that easy.

My Mom never made it fried although she had 50 ways to cook chicken.

My wife does not cook.

http://www.marthastewart.com/339742/buttermilk-fried-chicken.

Any tips?

seanz
04-26-2012, 01:20 AM
Any tips?

Don't wear you're frilly apron.

skipper68
04-26-2012, 02:40 AM
I have Martha Stewart table on the aft deck. It was an issue to make him cut it for the curve. "And that's all I'm saying about that"....Not. be back with a recipe, for all..

pipefitter
04-26-2012, 03:10 AM
I have gotten away from much in the way of fried food, which is a challenge living in the South. But this is by far the best way I have found to cook boneless/skinless chicken breasts. I add different seasonings to the flour such as garlic/onion powder, some seasonall or Adobo or poultry seasoning or all of the above or some basil perhaps. It comes out as advertised.

http://www.thekitchn.com/super-kitchen-m-36891

skipper68
04-26-2012, 03:19 AM
Soak your favorite chicky in Blue Cheese dressing,(Fat free or real) baste it in wing dip, while cooking. Dip in the CLEAN unused condiments. Yummy..KFC always wins. :(

leikec
04-26-2012, 03:36 AM
Brine the chicken. Use peanut oil. Make sure the flour is seasoned properly. Make sure the oil isn't too hot--you'll ended up with burned skin outside, raw chicken on the inside.

If you pan fry, be careful not to overload the pan with chicken all at once--the oil temperature will drop too much and the chicken will be greasy.

Most supermarkets sell packs of chicken legs. They are perfect for learning to fry chicken as they will cook evenly, and I don't know a lot of people who don't like chicken legs.

If you brine the chicken legs, you can cook them until the skin shrinks up on the leg without fear of overcooking--the brine will keep the meat moist.

You can also soak the chicken in buttermilk before cooking...I'm not a fan, and I also don't care for double-dredged chicken; it is hard to cook properly, and I don't like the heavy crust formed by double-dredging.

Jeff C

skipper68
04-26-2012, 03:56 AM
It's a chicken. I have a built in rotisserie. Buy the whole Chicken COOKED cheaper per pound, than raw... NO. WTH??

David W Pratt
04-26-2012, 09:59 AM
I use a fryalator our son liberated from a junk room at college. All the markings are worn off and you need to use a bar clamp to hold the element in.
Drench the chicken in milk, dredge in 1/2 and 1/2 flour and cornmeal, fry till crispy then put in 160 degree oven to cook through with out burning.
While last batch is finishing up make onion rings.
Make cream gravy, serve with mashed potatoes and green beans.
Foreigners are blown away by it.

Mrleft8
04-26-2012, 10:28 AM
The first problem was following Martha Steward's recipe..... That's like buying a "ROLECKS" watch in Times square, and expecting it to keep proper time....
The trick to fried chicken is in the oil, and the salt. Yer oil needs to be able to get hot w/o smoking. I like corn oil, but peanut oil is even better. Do not brine yer chicken. If you do brine it for some reason, you'll need to completely dry it with paper towels.... Don't miss that bit where the skin is loose....
Now dredge yer chicken in flour seasoned with coarse salt, black pepper and Bell's poultry seasoning..... Put a gob of paprika in there too..... I like the flour to look like the dust you'll find under the edge of a rug....
Set yer chicken parts on a wire rack, and throw a handful of cracker meal or corn meal into the leftover flour mix, and dredge yer chicken parts again. Put them in the hot oil and cover them. Reduce the heat to medium low immediately. After about 10 minutes flip the parts and leave uncovered for another 10 minutes. Flip them babies again until both sides are golden and crispy.
Taste. Good? Good! Not so good? Try adding a little more salt next time.

Paul Pless
04-26-2012, 10:34 AM
Try adding a little more salt next time.or maybe fry in lard instead of corn oil. . .

Shang
04-26-2012, 11:05 AM
Become vegetarian.

Paul Pless
04-26-2012, 11:08 AM
Become vegetarian.

why

switters
04-26-2012, 11:47 AM
When faced with similar situations, I typically try to find a wife who can cook. Another option would be going to the Speckled Buttered Bean in Brooksville, Florida. Flying to Florida is obviously the least expensive option, and you know you are going to get some good fried chicken.

YMMV.

Minnesnowtan
04-26-2012, 01:37 PM
I have to agree with the salt comment. Most people when they fry chicken have underseasoned chicken. Before dredging the chicken, taste your flour mixture. Keep adjusting until you get it right. I just do it by guess and golly now via taste because it depends on who is here how much dredge I need to make. I do not have a set recipe other than flour, salt, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder. Once in a while I will grind up some rosemary and thyme with the mortar and pestel and add that too.

Nicholas Carey
04-26-2012, 03:11 PM
This is a really good recipe.

Southern Pan-Fried Chicken

From The Gift of Southern Cooking: Recipes and Revelations from Two Great American Cooks (http://www.amazon.com/The-Gift-Southern-Cooking-Revelations/dp/0375400354), by Edna Lewis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edna_Lewis) and Scott Peacock (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott_Peacock)

We have blended our best chicken frying tips from Virginia and Alabama in this recipe: it requires a bit of extra effort, but the results are absolutely outstanding. The chicken gets two long soaks, Alabama-style, first in brine and then in buttermilk. The frying fat is a special mix -- Virginia-style -- of lard and sweet butter, flavored with a slice of country ham, which makes the chicken extra crispy and rich tasting. The cornstarch in the dredge adds to the crispness too. Carefully cooked, fried chicken will absorb a minimal amount of fat. Be sure to pat off all excess dredge; fry evenly at the proper temperature; and drain the chicken well on crumpled-up -- not flat -- paper towels or a wire rack.

One 3-pound chicken, cut into 8 pieces
kosher or coarse sea salt, for brining
1 quart buttermilk
1 pound lard
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter
1/2 cup country-ham pieces, or 1 thick slice country ham cut into 1/2 inch strips
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons corn starch
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

To prepare the chicken for frying:

1. Make a brine in the ratio of 1/4 c. salt to 1 quart water, enough to completely cover the chicken. Cover the bowl and refrigerate for for 8-12 hours. Drain the brined chicken and rinse out the bowl in which it was brined.

2. Return the chicken to the bowl and pour the buttermilk over it. Cover and refrigerate for 8-12 hours. Drain the chicken on a wire rack, discarding the buttermilk.

Meanwhile, prepare for frying...

1. Put the lard, butter and country ham in a [cast-iron] skillet or shallow dutch oven. Cook over low heat for 30-45 minutes, skimming as needed, until the butter ceases to throw off foam and the country ham has browned.

2. Use a slotted spoon to carefully remove the ham from the fat. Save the ham, though: you can make smoked pork stock from it.)
Just before frying, increase the temperature to medium-high and heat the fat to 335 degrees Fahrenheit. You’ll need to monitor the temperature carefully (use a deep frying thermometer).

3. Prepare the dredge: blend together the flour, cornstarch, salt and pepper in a shallow bowl or on wax paper. [Myself, I like a paper bag. It simplifies things].

4. Dredge the drained chicken pieces thoroughly in the flour mixture, then pat well to remove all excess flour.

5. Slip some of the chicken pieces, skin side down, into the heated fat. Do not overcrowd the pan. Fry in batches, if necessary. [If the pan is overcrowded, the chicken will more steam than fry]. Cook for 8-10 minutes on each side, until the chicken is golden brown and cooked through. The juices should run clear. Check the temperature with an instant-read thermometer, especially near the bone: you’re looking for 165 degrees Fahrenheit, internal.

6. Drain thoroughly on a wire rack or on crumpled paper towels and serve.

Fried chicken is delicious eaten hot, warm, at room temperature or cold. [But you knew that].

Shang
04-26-2012, 03:24 PM
Become vegetarian.


why

If I went into details it would spoil everybody's lunch.

Paul Pless
04-26-2012, 03:29 PM
The frying fat is a special mix -- Virginia-style -- of lard and sweet butter, flavored with a slice of country ham

Now that's what I'm talking about!

Mrleft8
04-26-2012, 03:40 PM
Now that's what I'm talking about!

And this helps explain your 32" waist line, and light as a feather gait....

Paul Pless
04-26-2012, 03:40 PM
I'm just big boned; although will admit that its a damn good thing that I'm relatively tall. . .

Mrleft8
04-26-2012, 03:42 PM
I'm just big boned; although will admit that its a damn good thing that I'm relatively tall. . .
I wasn't aware that bones had all that much to do with double chins....

Paul Pless
04-26-2012, 03:44 PM
man you are cutthroat

Mrleft8
04-26-2012, 03:45 PM
man you are cutthroat

Yes........ Yes I am! :D

Steve McMahon
04-26-2012, 04:03 PM
When faced with similar situations, I typically try to find a wife who can cook. Another option would be going to the Speckled Buttered Bean in Brooksville, Florida. Flying to Florida is obviously the least expensive option, and you know you are going to get some good fried chicken.

YMMV.

OK, it took me a minute and I had to read it twice. Thankfully I had swallowed my coffee when I figured it out. :d

bobbys
04-26-2012, 04:06 PM
I wasn't aware that bones had all that much to do with double chins.....

Please stay on topic!

bobbys
04-26-2012, 04:07 PM
OK, it took me a minute and I had to read it twice. Thankfully I had swallowed my coffee when I figured it out. :d,

Sure it was funny but this thread is about Chicken not him being Rodney Dangerfield!

bobbys
04-26-2012, 04:08 PM
This is a really good recipe.

Southern Pan-Fried Chicken

From The Gift of Southern Cooking: Recipes and Revelations from Two Great American Cooks (http://www.amazon.com/The-Gift-Southern-Cooking-Revelations/dp/0375400354), by Edna Lewis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edna_Lewis) and Scott Peacock (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott_Peacock)

We have blended our best chicken frying tips from Virginia and Alabama in this recipe: it requires a bit of extra effort, but the results are absolutely outstanding. The chicken gets two long soaks, Alabama-style, first in brine and then in buttermilk. The frying fat is a special mix -- Virginia-style -- of lard and sweet butter, flavored with a slice of country ham, which makes the chicken extra crispy and rich tasting. The cornstarch in the dredge adds to the crispness too. Carefully cooked, fried chicken will absorb a minimal amount of fat. Be sure to pat off all excess dredge; fry evenly at the proper temperature; and drain the chicken well on crumpled-up -- not flat -- paper towels or a wire rack.

One 3-pound chicken, cut into 8 pieces
kosher or coarse sea salt, for brining
1 quart buttermilk
1 pound lard
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter
1/2 cup country-ham pieces, or 1 thick slice country ham cut into 1/2 inch strips
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons corn starch
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

To prepare the chicken for frying:

1. Make a brine in the ratio of 1/4 c. salt to 1 quart water, enough to completely cover the chicken. Cover the bowl and refrigerate for for 8-12 hours. Drain the brined chicken and rinse out the bowl in which it was brined.

2. Return the chicken to the bowl and pour the buttermilk over it. Cover and refrigerate for 8-12 hours. Drain the chicken on a wire rack, discarding the buttermilk.

Meanwhile, prepare for frying...

1. Put the lard, butter and country ham in a [cast-iron] skillet or shallow dutch oven. Cook over low heat for 30-45 minutes, skimming as needed, until the butter ceases to throw off foam and the country ham has browned.

2. Use a slotted spoon to carefully remove the ham from the fat. Save the ham, though: you can make smoked pork stock from it.)
Just before frying, increase the temperature to medium-high and heat the fat to 335 degrees Fahrenheit. You’ll need to monitor the temperature carefully (use a deep frying thermometer).

3. Prepare the dredge: blend together the flour, cornstarch, salt and pepper in a shallow bowl or on wax paper. [Myself, I like a paper bag. It simplifies things].

4. Dredge the drained chicken pieces thoroughly in the flour mixture, then pat well to remove all excess flour.

5. Slip some of the chicken pieces, skin side down, into the heated fat. Do not overcrowd the pan. Fry in batches, if necessary. [If the pan is overcrowded, the chicken will more steam than fry]. Cook for 8-10 minutes on each side, until the chicken is golden brown and cooked through. The juices should run clear. Check the temperature with an instant-read thermometer, especially near the bone: you’re looking for 165 degrees Fahrenheit, internal.

6. Drain thoroughly on a wire rack or on crumpled paper towels and serve.

Fried chicken is delicious eaten hot, warm, at room temperature or cold. [But you knew that]..

Bookmarked!

bobbys
04-26-2012, 04:09 PM
Become vegetarian..

Hey i don't go ruining your threads.

OK well sometimes..

bobbys
04-26-2012, 04:09 PM
Brine the chicken. Use peanut oil. Make sure the flour is seasoned properly. Make sure the oil isn't too hot--you'll ended up with burned skin outside, raw chicken on the inside.

If you pan fry, be careful not to overload the pan with chicken all at once--the oil temperature will drop too much and the chicken will be greasy.

Most supermarkets sell packs of chicken legs. They are perfect for learning to fry chicken as they will cook evenly, and I don't know a lot of people who don't like chicken legs.

If you brine the chicken legs, you can cook them until the skin shrinks up on the leg without fear of overcooking--the brine will keep the meat moist.

You can also soak the chicken in buttermilk before cooking...I'm not a fan, and I also don't care for double-dredged chicken; it is hard to cook properly, and I don't like the heavy crust formed by double-dredging.

Jeff C.

Chicken legs?.

Great idea!

bobbys
04-26-2012, 04:10 PM
The first problem was following Martha Steward's recipe..... That's like buying a "ROLECKS" watch in Times square, and expecting it to keep proper time....
The trick to fried chicken is in the oil, and the salt. Yer oil needs to be able to get hot w/o smoking. I like corn oil, but peanut oil is even better. Do not brine yer chicken. If you do brine it for some reason, you'll need to completely dry it with paper towels.... Don't miss that bit where the skin is loose....
Now dredge yer chicken in flour seasoned with coarse salt, black pepper and Bell's poultry seasoning..... Put a gob of paprika in there too..... I like the flour to look like the dust you'll find under the edge of a rug....
Set yer chicken parts on a wire rack, and throw a handful of cracker meal or corn meal into the leftover flour mix, and dredge yer chicken parts again. Put them in the hot oil and cover them. Reduce the heat to medium low immediately. After about 10 minutes flip the parts and leave uncovered for another 10 minutes. Flip them babies again until both sides are golden and crispy.
Taste. Good? Good! Not so good? Try adding a little more salt next time..

I like it but spect your wife wrote it!

Donn
04-26-2012, 04:27 PM
Smack. Smack. Now I've got a taste for fried chicken.

Unfortunately, SWMBO won't make any tonight. Her fried chicken is excellent.

Fortunately, I've trained my palate to tolerate and even enjoy ready-made fried chicken. There's a place, not too far away, called Zorns, which makes great fried chicken. If she won't go there on the way home from the RR station, maybe she'll stop at KFC...which I've also been known to enjoy.

Mrleft8
04-26-2012, 04:31 PM
.

I like it but spect your wife wrote it!

I spect not.... Her mother makes extraordinary fried chicken though, and rumor has it that her aunt Myrtle made the absolute best fried chicken ever..... But she died of fat poisoning before I married into the recip..... Er..... family.....

bobbys
04-26-2012, 04:32 PM
Smack. Smack. Now I've got a taste for fried chicken.

Unfortunately, SWMBO won't make any tonight. Her fried chicken is excellent.

Fortunately, I've trained my palate to tolerate and even enjoy ready-made fried chicken. There's a place, not too far away, called Zorns, which makes great fried chicken. If she won't go there on the way home from the RR station, maybe she'll stop at KFC...which I've also been known to enjoy..

I was thinking about KFC sept there was a article about the manager here being fired for not serving 3 week old chicken..

Cannot think of any fried chicken places around here its all clam chowder out of a can with added flour.

bobbys
04-26-2012, 04:36 PM
I spect not.... Her mother makes extraordinary fried chicken though, and rumor has it that her aunt Myrtle made the absolute best fried chicken ever..... But she died of fat poisoning before I married into the recip..... Er..... family......

OK well i had no idea you knew fried chicken which poses a Dial emma for me now i HAVE to take you off my Commie pinko yellow rat basstart list !.

Darn, i hate that when it happens!.

Still have DavidG and glenn on though!

Mrleft8
04-26-2012, 04:43 PM
And please do NOT explain what a "Dial enema" is...

Minnesnowtan
04-26-2012, 06:48 PM
OK, I am currently making my fried chicken:

1 cup flour
1 heaping tablespoon of garlic powder
1 heaping tablespoon of onion powder.
1 rounded tablespoon of black pepper.
1/2 teaspoon lowrys season salt.
Normal salt until tasting the flour mixture tastes a tad bit salty.

Dip in milk run through dredge, dip in milk, run through dredge, place in cast iron skillet 1/4 full of lard and butter in equal parts. Once you have a light browning going on all sides reduce heat to medium and slowly pan fry until done.

David G
04-26-2012, 07:32 PM
.

OK well i had no idea you knew fried chicken which poses a Dial emma for me now i HAVE to take you off my Commie pinko yellow rat basstart list !.

Darn, i hate that when it happens!.

Still have DavidG and glenn on though!

You just have us on FAKE ignore!

Let us know if you succeed at making consistently good fried chicken. Maybe you'll tempt me into visiting Gear-hearkansaw after all!

McMike
04-26-2012, 07:34 PM
I wasn't aware that bones had all that much to do with double chins....



Wow . . . just wow . . . :d

LeeG
04-26-2012, 07:50 PM
Any tips?

pressure cooker fryer, works for the restaurants.

LeeG
04-26-2012, 07:52 PM
Brine the chicken. Use peanut oil. Make sure the flour is seasoned properly. Make sure the oil isn't too hot--you'll ended up with burned skin outside, raw chicken on the inside.

If you pan fry, be careful not to overload the pan with chicken all at once--the oil temperature will drop too much and the chicken will be greasy.

Most supermarkets sell packs of chicken legs. They are perfect for learning to fry chicken as they will cook evenly, and I don't know a lot of people who don't like chicken legs.

If you brine the chicken legs, you can cook them until the skin shrinks up on the leg without fear of overcooking--the brine will keep the meat moist.

You can also soak the chicken in buttermilk before cooking...I'm not a fan, and I also don't care for double-dredged chicken; it is hard to cook properly, and I don't like the heavy crust formed by double-dredging.

Jeff C

thx, those are good directions

Donn
04-26-2012, 07:54 PM
pressure cooker fryer, works for the restaurants.

That's what Harlan changed to...in order to save time.

bobbys
04-26-2012, 07:56 PM
Wonder how many have a hankering for fried Chicken after reading this thread.

Just imagine biting into the perfect crust and the meat being soft and juicy..

Washed down with a cold beer!.

Potato salad on the side.

In fact the next morn grab a cold leg out of the fridge for breakfast.

Or make a midnight snack of cold fried chicken.


UUUMMM wow awful good!.

Don't you wish you had some right now?.

The house smells like fried Chicken!.

Wish i had some right now.

It would be good!

LeeG
04-26-2012, 07:57 PM
oh hell, I'm going to Safeway tonight.

McMike
04-26-2012, 08:06 PM
Wonder how many have a hankering for fried Chicken after reading this thread.

Just imagine biting into the perfect crust and the meat being soft and juicy..

Washed down with a cold beer!.

Potato salad on the side.

In fact the next morn grab a cold leg out of the fridge for breakfast.

Or make a midnight snack of cold fried chicken.


UUUMMM wow awful good!.

Don't you wish you had some right now?.

The house smells like fried Chicken!.

Wish i had some right now.

It would be good!

How much is the fried chicken lobby paying you? :d

bobbys
04-26-2012, 08:14 PM
Fried chicken porn.

http://images4.fanpop.com/image/photos/24100000/fried-chicken-meat-24188053-1122-1121.jpg

brad9798
04-26-2012, 10:27 PM
I have been using a FChicken recipe that was developed over 170 years ago ... AND it works perfectly, even for a dope like me!!!

IRON skillet? CHECK!

Milk? CHECK!

Flour? CHECK!

Other stuff, that I am sworn to not share? CHECK!

bobbys
04-27-2012, 11:09 AM
No fried chicken yet.

Maybe tonight.

Sure sounds good.

switters
04-30-2012, 04:50 PM
Got Chicken?

Mrleft8
04-30-2012, 04:57 PM
I have found, despite the doubts of certain someones, that the weather does indeed have an effect on the crispiness of fried chicken. If it's seriously humid, or pouring rain, it's very difficult to get crispy pan fried chicken..... It's also very difficult to make mayonnaise in those conditions.

bobbys
04-30-2012, 04:58 PM
No Fried Chicken as of yet but My wife went to Safe way and i gave detailed orders for day old under the lights fried chicken, 2 legs, 2 breasts.

With any luck she will not pick out the dried up pieces but i will not count on it.

There is a talent for picking out the Freshest Corn dawgs and Chicken.

leikec
04-30-2012, 05:12 PM
No Fried Chicken as of yet but My wife went to Safe way and i gave detailed orders for day old under the lights fried chicken, 2 legs, 2 breasts.

With any luck she will not pick out the dried up pieces but i will not count on it.

There is a talent for picking out the Freshest Corn dawgs and Chicken.


Can she pick chicken as well as she picks roofers?? :D:D:D:D

Sorry, couldn't resist.

Jeff C

bobbys
04-30-2012, 05:23 PM
Can she pick chicken as well as she picks roofers?? :D:D:D:D

Sorry, couldn't resist.

Jeff C.

LOL that reminds me i need to fix the roof.

But if you really want to know how we met you being nosy and all.

I lied and told her i was rich.

She lied and told me she was rich.

leikec
04-30-2012, 05:31 PM
.

LOL that reminds me i need to fix the roof.

But if you really want to know how we met you being nosy and all.

I lied and told her i was rich.

She lied and told me she was rich.


That's rich.

Jeff C

Mrleft8
04-30-2012, 05:33 PM
I bet she can pick banjo while she's pickin' her tooth with an ice pick and picklin' peppers while the chickens are peckin' the peppers and pickin' up ticks, while Bobbys' tarring their feathers and peppering the back yard with pot shots from his pick-up with a pick axe.

ccmanuals
04-30-2012, 09:28 PM
Paul Dean has a simple receipe that is great!Ingredients

3 eggs
1/3 cup water
About 1 cup hot red pepper (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/red-pepper/index.html) sauce (recommended: Texas Pete)
2 cups self-rising flour (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/self-rising-flour/index.html)
1 teaspoon pepper
House seasoning, recipe follows
1 (1 to 2 1/2-pound) chicken, cut into pieces
Oil, for frying, preferably peanut oil (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/peanut-oil/index.html)

Directions In a medium size bowl, beat the eggs (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/eggs/index.html) with the water. Add enough hot sauce (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/sauce/index.html) so the egg mixture is bright orange (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/orange/index.html). In another bowl, combine the flour and pepper. Season the chicken with the house seasoning. Dip the seasoned chicken in the egg, and then coat well in the flour mixture.
Heat the oil to 350 degrees F in a deep pot. Do not fill the pot more than 1/2 full with oil.
Fry (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/fry/index.html) the chicken (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/chicken/index.html) in the oil until brown and crisp (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/crisp/index.html). Dark meat takes longer then white meat. It should take dark meat about 13 to 14 minutes, white meat around 8 to 10 minutes.

House Seasoning:

1 cup salt
1/4 cup black pepper
1/4 cup garlic (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/garlic/index.html) powder

Mix ingredients together and store in an airtight container for up to 6 months.

Minnesnowtan
04-30-2012, 09:36 PM
The other night when I made fried chicken, I saved the left over flour mixture in a bowl in the fridge. So tonight, I mixed up 1lb of ground chuck with salt and pepper and an egg dredged it in the flour mixture and fried on medium in a cast iron pan with some butter. When they were almost cooked through, I used a couple tablespoons of the left over flour mixture in a cup of milk, and made gravy in the pan. Put the CHICKEN FRIED STEAK back in the pan and let it finish on medium low.


Finger licking good!

brad9798
05-01-2012, 01:14 AM
Sounds good to me, Minnesnowtan ... :)