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Meli
03-21-2012, 02:14 AM
Wondering what you lot want done with your final remains.

I don't know if sea burials are generally allowed.

Crematoriums are horrible and not very environmentally friendly and wasteful.

Here's a good humoured look at someones Eco Burial.:D

Whaddya do?

Why dad's eco-funeral went horribly wrong

By CLAIRE WALLERSTEIN, Daily Mail
Last updated at 16:06 08 June 2006



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http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2006/06/louisSWNS080606_228x248.jpg Daddy dearest: Claire's father Louis had a 'green' funeral

My father was buried in a cardboard coffin and placed next to a pet cemetery miles from our family home. Read about the 'green' funeral that went horribly wrong: As his final statement, a 'green' burial seemed the perfect way for my father to take his leave of planet Earth.

Not only would it avoid rare tropical hardwoods being felled and carted halfway around the world for a coffin that would be seen for only a few hours, but the burial would cost fraction of the amount of a more conventional send-off - which was particularly pleasing for a man who would re-use every Styrofoam cup and piece of string.

My mother had booked plots for my father and herself by phone with a Somerset-based green undertakers after reading a newspaper article about eco-burials several years ago.
At the time, there were only a handful of green burial sites in the country. Today, there are around 200, and you can choose from seven different models of cardboard coffins, costing around £55 including overnight delivery.
If cardboard's not your style, you could be buried in a bamboo casket, a moss-lined woven willow nest or even a sack. The service can range from nothing at all - the simple deposition of a shroud-clad corpse into the earth - to the full religious works with horse-drawn hearses, music and a priest. (While sites are rarely consecrated, a priest can bless an individual plot.)

Once my mother had paid, we didn't really discuss it further. I preferred to put the whole thing out of my mind and, in any case, it hardly seemed urgent.

It wasn't until my father, a lifelong smoker, died of emphysema in 2004 and I decided to take charge of arrangements, that I realised we didn't even know where the burial site was, except that it was somewhere near our home in Cornwall.
The number of green burial sites nationwide may have mushroomed, but they are still far from mainstream, and so the green undertaking firms servicing them often cover large areas.
The staff at the company we used were friendly and supportive, but the fact they were based in Somerset, two counties east of us, meant we had to make many of the arrangements ourselves.
There are no binding regulations governing green burial sites - after what we experienced, I've come to the conclusion someone should do something about that.

Sobbing uncontrollably
I hadn't anticipated, for example, having to ring the gravedigger while my father was still alive (just), so that the man would be able to dig the hole in time. I was sobbing so uncontrollably that I had to call back three times.
For a couple of hundred pounds, I suppose we should not have expected the tailormade 'death care services' of TV's comedy series Six Feet Under, but I was definitely starting to wish I had found out more about what to expect before we got to this stage.

While some people actively choose to make their relative's death even more Do-It-Yourself than ours - washing and laying out the body at home, for example - I was glad that we had not gone so far down this path.
I had previously thought being 'numb with grief' was a cliché, but I found it hard even to remember the undertaker's simple instructions about, for example, what certificates to collect and where to take them.
After he died, my father was taken to the local funeral parlour, where he received all the normal treatment except for the environmentally unfriendly embalming process.
However, we had not realised - with hindsight, perhaps naively - that this also meant we would be unable to visit my body in a chapel of rest, as an unembalmed body cannot legally be put on view. So he lay in a freezer in a funeral parlour on an industrial estate.

Cardboard coffin
A couple of lovely men from the Somerset undertakers met us at the funeral parlour on the day of my father's burial four days later, having already transferred his body to its white cardboard coffin. It only briefly crossed my mind that it looked a little like some kind of IKEA flat pack.

My uncle had gone to view the burial site a few days earlier and found a bungalow surrounded by decaying motorbikes and children's toys. We had been seized by dread that my dad was going to be buried under this garden detritus.
Thankfully, the bungalow turned out to be the proprietor's home, and the graveyard itself was on a nearby hillside overlooking a beautiful wooded valley.
We had chosen to carry my father's coffin ourselves - it seemed like a final service we could perform for him, much more personal and fitting than asking the men from the undertaker's do it.

Pet cemetery
However, what we did not expect was that half the site would be given over to a pet cemetery. It was rather surreal to read signs such as 'Cassie, a brave pony' as we carried the coffin past.
My mother and I, both animal lovers, didn't mind, but my brother found this shockingly disrespectful to the human dead.
We were at last able to see Dad again when his coffin was opened at the graveside for a final goodbye.
As requested, the local undertakers had dressed him in his favourite clothes, false teeth and laid him on the fleecy dressing gown he'd worn so much towards the end of his life.
For a 'service' we kept things simple and personal and free from religion - we held a proper memorial service a month later in home village.
Another thing we all liked about green burials was that, instead of an impersonal marble headstone, a tree would be planted on my dad's grave, converting the nutrients from his remains into new life in a site that would eventually revert to woodland, providing food and shelter for wildlife.
We were told we had to wait for the soil to settle, and so it wasn't until a few months later that we came back to the site to plant our rowan sapling, having first called the proprietor and arranged for him to have a hole dug ready on the grave site.
After a 45-minute drive, we arrived to find no hole and no owner. After frantically and fruitlessly trying all the phone numbers on the sign outside his deserted house, I finally made contact with the apparently unapologetic owner, who said he would send his son.
After a half-hour wait in the drizzle, the shovel-bearing son arrived. Together we tramped up to the cemetery - whereupon a terrible realisation dawned; none of us could remember where my father was buried.
The boy called his father, who said my dad was in Row One, Plot 16. Around 30 people had already been buried in the site.
Although some of these plots had trees growing on them (many of them ornamental garden ones - not the indigenous woodland species that I'd expected), others, like my father's, still had yet to be marked in any obvious way.
It was therefore hard to tell where one stopped and the next started. So we all started to pace the distance out, like pirates searching for buried treasure on a desert island. Eventually, the owner's son decided on my father's whereabouts, and started to dig.

A foot down, when he hit solid slate, he became rather less sure. 'I normally only do the pets,' he beamed, by way of explanation.
Soaked, tired, and with my grizzling baby and elderly mother in tow, it seemed churlish to kick up a fuss.
And so he dug a hole and we planted a tree, not totally sure whether it was actually on my father's grave, on someone else's grave or in a patch of undisturbed field.
Legally, graveyard plots must be identifiable for the burial register, and I am sure the owner himself would have been able to tell us which plot was my father's - had he actually done as we asked.
We now assume, as no one has ever asked us to move it from their relative's grave, that our tree is in the right place. But it would be nice not to be left with niggling doubts.

Luckily, my father was a very unconventional character, and I'm sure he would have seen the funny side.
My mother was less amused, but she didn't complain because she was worried the owner wouldn't look after the tree we had planted. Her fears were apparently confirmed the next time we returned.
It was looking in very poor shape and ants had obviously nested in the roots, though a year later it has now rallied.
Nonetheless, she still has no regrets about being buried in the same place as my father. "I'm not going to be around to worry about it," she explained. "I'll be happy as long as I'm buried and a tree is planted."
I, too, still think green burials are a good idea and would like one for myself. However, I would definitely visit the site first, and get recommendations from other families about the site and its proprietor.
Like most people, I suppose, we didn't want to think too much about the death process until it became unavoidable.
However, having chosen to operate in somewhat uncharted territory, we probably should have done.
Though we can now laugh at most of the 'lapses' we experienced, for other bereaved people these could have been utterly devastating.
Guardian Newspapers Ltd 2006


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-389741/Why-dads-eco-funeral-went-horribly-wrong.html#ixzz1pjVNyYs1

Gerarddm
03-21-2012, 02:16 AM
Ashes spread under a tree, to be reborn as countless little trees everywhere.

Uncle Duke
03-21-2012, 03:04 AM
I want someone to steal my body and make it vanish forever, leaving a perpetual mystery...

Meli
03-21-2012, 04:09 AM
Um, living or dead? :D

skuthorp
03-21-2012, 04:46 AM
Don't care beyond making sure it doesn't cost anyone much. It won't make any difference to me. Anyhow those sort of things are for those still alive though there are several industries making themselves rich on playing on the emotions of family members at their most vulnerable time.

seanz
03-21-2012, 04:49 AM
Oh bury me not on the lone prairie.......

Meli
03-21-2012, 04:57 AM
Don't care beyond making sure it doesn't cost anyone much. It won't make any difference to me. Anyhow those sort of things are for those still alive though there are several industries making themselves rich on playing on the emotions of family members at their most vulnerable time.

Hmm, I think that is the sticking point.
Almost everyone I know says they really dont care what happens to their bits.
But family seem afraid of being perceived as cheap, or feel they have to spend big to somehow demonstrate their grief.

I'm putting me druthers in me will, :)

skuthorp
03-21-2012, 05:00 AM
Me too, pity they don't have Guy Fawkes bonfires these days. :d:DMaybe I could will my body to the Liberal Party?

Meli
03-21-2012, 05:02 AM
Oh bury me not on the lone prairie.......

True, a Lunig cartoon of an aboriginal burial springs to mind.
Something like...

A bark wrapped bundle in a tree.
Thought bubble

"I'm hot and itchy and somewhere there's a party going on"

one of my favourits, but never been able to find it.

Meli
03-21-2012, 05:08 AM
Me too, pity they don't have Guy Fawkes bonfires these days. :d:DMaybe I could will my body to the Liberal Party?

Sadly, brain transfers are a long way off :D

Concordia...41
03-21-2012, 05:28 AM
http://youtu.be/vrZFZ1MsZmg

Paul Pless
03-21-2012, 05:34 AM
soylent green

Donn
03-21-2012, 05:38 AM
Interesting song title;
"Don't Bury Me (live) "

skuthorp
03-21-2012, 05:58 AM
Banjo player of my acquaintance had his wake early before he was too ill to go. After all he was paying. Another muso had his coffin used as a bar, strictly illegal I think but in a country town...............

John Smith
03-21-2012, 06:16 AM
Don't care beyond making sure it doesn't cost anyone much. It won't make any difference to me. Anyhow those sort of things are for those still alive though there are several industries making themselves rich on playing on the emotions of family members at their most vulnerable time.

Here the cost saving must be insisted upon. When my mom was cremated in '05, the cheapest was $1150 according to the state. Many will try to sell survivors more expensive.

Sea burials are legal. In fact there are charters available for that purpose. Laws about where to dump ashes are not very enforcable, and I doubt anyone tries. I can't remember anyone getting arrested for improper disposal. The remains of my parents went right where they has requested, via my centerboard trunk.

John Smith
03-21-2012, 06:18 AM
What I don't understand is funerals and graves. Cemetaries a full of folks no one living ever new. Families move away and can't visit the grave. Serious waste of money and land, IMO.

If they figure out how to do it, I'd like to be dissolved.

skuthorp
03-21-2012, 06:26 AM
What I don't understand is funerals and graves. Cemetaries a full of folks no one living ever new. Families move away and can't visit the grave. Serious waste of money and land, IMO.

If they figure out how to do it, I'd like to be dissolved.

George has already solved that one for you,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_George_Haigh

AndyG
03-21-2012, 06:31 AM
Dissolved - it has been figured out. Resomation is the answer. It takes a couple of hours. The leftovers are naught but a sterile liquid and bones.

That said, I think the right thing to do is to donate your body. You don't need it anymore, but there are people needing spare parts, and trainee medics needing experience. You could be helping loads of others after your death.

Andy

Mrleft8
03-21-2012, 06:45 AM
I figure if they can weaponize hot dog condiments, they can weaponize me..... I would like to be used for defensive purposes only though please....
"Oh my god! What happened to these poor guys!?"
"They were out on the front line and got caught in a toxic Doug cloud..... There wasn't even time to put on their protective suits....."
I'm practicing for this occasion constantly with mild doses of chilli, so my friends will have built up some immunity.

Meli
03-21-2012, 07:08 AM
Here the cost saving must be insisted upon. When my mom was cremated in '05, the cheapest was $1150 according to the state. Many will try to sell survivors more expensive.

Sea burials are legal. In fact there are charters available for that purpose. Laws about where to dump ashes are not very enforcable, and I doubt anyone tries. I can't remember anyone getting arrested for improper disposal. The remains of my parents went right where they has requested, via my centerboard trunk.

I wasn't talking about ashes :D

poignantly funny thing.
a friend of my sisters died of an OD many years ago.
they went to his favourite surf beach, to the whispering waters edge (it was a quiet day)
stood at the edge to picturesquely scatter on the ripplets.
Opened urn, tipped it expecting a plume to carry over the wavelets....

clump..

what do you do with a soggy heap of your mate clogging your thongs?

crack up :D

Ian McColgin
03-21-2012, 07:11 AM
My Dad actually gave it a great deal of thought. He most liked the idea of a "sky burial" where his body would be on a rick exposed to birds and other scavangers but that was not going to happen in Connecticut.

Among the compromises left Plan A was donating the body to Yale medical school with Plan B the simplest cremation and ashes scattered as we choose.

Mom had willed her brain to Harvard for Altheimers research and body to the med school.

In the event, since Dad's death involved an autopsey and the med school wants the baby docs to do the cutting, he was cremated. As for Harvard, when we discovered that the donation involved hopeless wrangling between the two recipients and that all costs (totalling about 4x cremation) fell on us, we told them to shove it, had Mom cremated at the same place that handled Dad, and got their ashes back nicely mixed in one cardboard box. Some ashes are about the farm and the rest will go into Long Island Sound this summer.

One wished that crematoria could at least set up as co-gens and use all that heat for some further cause but at least it's a step away from the insane fetishistic and idolatrous "American Way of Death".

Tylerdurden
03-21-2012, 07:18 AM
Hefty bag/ dumpster. I will be gone and it will not matter. Worry about a few dollars in minerals doesn't make sense.

Mrleft8
03-21-2012, 07:19 AM
I wasn't talking about ashes :D

poignantly funny thing.
a friend of my sisters died of an OD many years ago.
they went to his favourite surf beach, to the whispering waters edge (it was a quiet day)
stood at the edge to picturesquely scatter on the ripplets.
Opened urn, tipped it expecting a plume to carry over the wavelets....

clump..

what do you do with a soggy heap of your mate clogging your thongs?

crack up :D

Yeah......... They have a way of getting in the last laugh, don't they.....
When we liberated my mother's ashes at the edge of the salt marsh, into Long Island Sound, on a beautiful mill pond calm morning, just as we each took a handful of ash and tossed it into the water, a puff of wind came up, and covered all of us with fine gray ash... Both my sister and I got mouth fulls and were spitting and clearing our throats for hours afterwards..... :D

Flying Orca
03-21-2012, 07:20 AM
What will really happen: donation for teaching/research

What I'd like to have happen:

Tie Me At The Crossroads (Bruce Cockburn)

Tie me at the crossroads when I die
Hang me in the wind 'til I get good and dry
And the kids that pass can scratch their heads
And say "who was that guy?"
Tie me at the crossroads when I die

Looking outward see what you can see
By the time you look at something it's already history
As the echoes of our passing fade, all there is to say
Is, "you know I loved you all in my particular way"

(Chorus)

It's more blessed to give than it is to receive
Except when it comes to free advice I believe
Here I go anyway, back seat driving tonight
Move fast, stay cool, keep your eye on the front sight

(Chorus)

brad9798
03-21-2012, 05:55 PM
They can take anything that might help others to learn or survive from me ... toss the rest in the furnace ... put me on the mantle after that!

Peerie Maa
03-21-2012, 06:06 PM
Whatever my survivors think fitting. The funeral is for them after all.
For me, burn whatever the scientists/medicos can't use.

Mad Scientist
03-21-2012, 06:23 PM
The RCN does not carry out burials at sea nowadays. They do 'Commital of Ashes', in which a small box containing the ashes is sent over the side.

I looked into donating my remains to medical school, but I learned that not everybody is accepted or is used for doctor training.:mad: I'm signed up for organ donation - it isn't compulsory in Canada, yet - but I can't imagine that there'll be much left worth re-using.:d

But, I'd like to do a 'Joshua Slocum' - sail off to the sunny South, never to be seen again...

Tom

Bobby of Tulsa
03-21-2012, 06:53 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwU-ftZfc04

AussieBarney
03-21-2012, 06:54 PM
Wrap me in a shroud, bury me with all the pomp and ceromony that can be bought. It's gotta cost at least 30K.:rolleyes::d. Better still, put me in a glad bag and send me to the landfill, anything other than a "normal funeral". Maybe they can slice and dice me, there must be something left that is recycable. If not, medical research. The doc that does it can make his bones on a paper titled, "How not to live your life". The consequences of living life on the edge. It may be the way to a Nobel prize:D

Nanoose
03-21-2012, 07:18 PM
Donate it.
Let them pass on what's useful, have the trainees cut, poke, prod and learn, run experiments, then dispose of whatever is left in whatever way it is they take care of such things.
Total cost: $0

But, having read the piece, I think I'll do some research... ;)

Nanoose
03-21-2012, 07:26 PM
Hefty bag/ dumpster.

Wonder if it could be gotten away with....why not? It'll decompose, unlike a lot of other stuff bein sent to the heap...

Nanoose
03-21-2012, 08:14 PM
Or better yet - promession.

BrianY
03-21-2012, 08:21 PM
Donate my corpse to science after giving all of the useful bits to folks that can use them. Burn the leftovers and dump the ashes in a forest.

Cemeteries are a waste of land an an environmental hazard.

seanz
03-21-2012, 08:36 PM
Wonder if it could be gotten away with....why not? It'll decompose, unlike a lot of other stuff bein sent to the heap...

Happens all the time, it's just not legal.

And spare a thought for the people that work at the dump.............

Chip-skiff
03-21-2012, 10:37 PM
Donate the working parts. Torch the rest. Put my ashes in my old cowboy hat, and spin it off a high peak in a stiff wind.

Robbie 2
03-21-2012, 11:39 PM
Burn then place ashes in a large Helium filled balloon and let me rise over the sea as high as it can go before it bursts and scatters to the four winds.
This would satisfy both of my love of flying and the sea/fishing etc.
If any one wants to remember me I don't want them visiting a lonely grave somewhere...........come stand on a nice beach and watch the sunset/rise.

SaltyD from BC
03-21-2012, 11:48 PM
Blow me up in an inferno with botebum's toaster

Gib Etheridge
03-22-2012, 12:15 AM
Donate to a med school if it's beyond my control. Boat then hike out into a remote area on the west coast and find a cozy place under a giant old growth cedar and take way too much sedative if it's time and I have one more hike left in me.

purri
03-22-2012, 12:52 AM
My bris went to the Great Brisatorium many decades ago...

Meli
03-22-2012, 02:32 AM
How come no one has requested that they be taxidermed and used for a hat stand yet?

My mother did, thankfully she's not passed over yet:D

stevebaby
03-22-2012, 04:17 AM
Having dined well on the residents of the ocean, it seems only polite to return the favour.
Unfortunately, they'll have to settle for a pile of ash.
I win.

skuthorp
03-22-2012, 04:34 AM
There was an English peer that left his body to the Battersea Dogs Home, as dinner. He also left it a great deal of money.

We arranged for my dad's ashes, as an ex navy man, to be scattered at sea. The navy did the job when they had a ship going somewhere. What they didn't know was that mum was in there too:d.

Curtism
03-22-2012, 04:38 AM
Having dined well on the residents of the ocean, it seems only polite to return the favour.
Unfortunately, they'll have to settle for a pile of ash.
I win.

Try mixing some Snickers' in with the ashes.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6e0Gsn4khss

Meli
03-22-2012, 04:44 AM
Ah, humour in death :D Et in arcadia ego

obscured by clouds
03-22-2012, 05:20 AM
poignantly funny thing.
a friend of my sisters died of an OD many years ago.
they went to his favourite surf beach, to the whispering waters edge (it was a quiet day)
stood at the edge to picturesquely scatter on the ripplets.
Opened urn, tipped it expecting a plume to carry over the wavelets....

clump..

what do you do with a soggy heap of your mate clogging your thongs?

crack up :D



many years ago my father received a request for the local Lifeboat to take out the ashes of a prominent fund raiser for the RNLI.

It started badly as the the lifeboat rose to the swell on the bar to the harbour and the casket fell over spilling some of the ashes into the bilge.

As much as possible was hastily scooped back into the urn, with the mechanic cheerfully stating that he'd vacuum the rest up later.

At the appointed spot the lifeboat hove to in what was now an onshore F5 and rising. Luckily the party was persuaded not to scatter the ashes on the windward side of the boat.

However as the ashes were scattered to leeward, one of the crew was clearly overheard muttering 'I don't know about a burial at sea, with this wind, he's going to be ashore before we are!'



The above anecdote led later on to a much loved Peyton cartoon.

Meli
03-22-2012, 05:25 AM
:D
keep em coming :D

John Smith
03-22-2012, 05:29 AM
Dissolved - it has been figured out. Resomation is the answer. It takes a couple of hours. The leftovers are naught but a sterile liquid and bones.

That said, I think the right thing to do is to donate your body. You don't need it anymore, but there are people needing spare parts, and trainee medics needing experience. You could be helping loads of others after your death.

Andy
If I thought that donating my body would lead to answers for migraines, I'd love to.

P-man
03-22-2012, 05:38 AM
http://youtu.be/KYjDY3aG1K4

skuthorp
03-22-2012, 05:40 AM
If I thought that donating my body would lead to answers for migraines, I'd love to.

Acupuncture cured my chronic migraines 35 years ago. Ten treatments and never one since. Sometimes I get the other symptoms still though, mild nausea, stiff neck muscles but none of the headaches that plagued me through all my school years and after.

TomF
03-22-2012, 10:32 AM
I really don't care. Signed up already to donate any usable parts - if science wants the rest, so be it. Beyond that, whatever my survivors want. What Joe did with Lucky's body was brilliant ... but was brilliant mostly because of what the celebration of Lucky's life meant to Joe. Lucky was elsewhere at the time, as I will be when it's my turn.

Dad bought a little plot where his own ashes are buried now, and where my mom's will join when she's ready. After decades of presiding at funerals 9Dad was clergy), he made sure that all was pre-paid and pre-arranged with the funeral guys so we wouldn't have to give it a thought. Not surprisingly, the cemetary is close to where he and Mom lived last ... convenient for him, but even if family were inclined to visit ... it's days away. I couldn't find it without help, and the place felt rather solemnly impersonal ... which wasn't really much like Dad.

Our bodies are meant to be temporary, meant to give up their constituents to be remade into new things. If mine could become fertilizer for a field or forest, turned into leaves, apples, grain, and animal/bird/insect life, so much the better. And if by doing that, my family could get a good chance to help their own grieving processes, even better.

boatbuddha
03-22-2012, 10:34 AM
I really don't care. They can grind me up and use me as filler in school lunch meats for all i care.

Tylerdurden
03-22-2012, 10:38 AM
I figure I will use up every useful part before I pass. Pretty much well on my way so donation would be just passing disposal costs over to someone else.
About all they would learn is what happens to a body that was under decades of constant abuse. :)

skipper68
03-22-2012, 11:05 AM
After the teaching hospital, Upstate Medical Center saved my mothers life from the young age of 43, she donated her body to them. We had quite a few calls from students, asking questions, which convinced the Captain and I to do the same. You have to contact them and fill out forms before hand, and you get a card to carry with your license, directing your remains there. Thy don't charge anything, and her cremains were returned in 2 months. We made some of her ashes into glass pendants, to have her closer to our hearts. We also have any donations available for others in need, that the hospital decides to transplant. It makes so much more sense to help others, with a body that would otherwise just rot in the ground.

John Meachen
03-22-2012, 05:27 PM
The best and most appropriate scattering of remains I have ever learned of happened to the fondly remembered Gray Baskerville of Hot Rod magazine.His ashes were packed into a parachute during Bonneville Speed Week and with his family sitting in his Model A hot rod watching,they were scattered to the elements at the end of a run.

Greg Nolan
03-22-2012, 06:24 PM
I'm putting me druthers in me will, :)


That won't do any harm, but it won't do any good, either.

Your will won't be dealt with until well after your funeral is over with, and whatever your will says about your funeral will not matter.

You need to make your druthers known to whoever is going to make your funeral arrangements -- put them in writing, but it is hard for you to make them stick when you are gone.

Willin'
03-22-2012, 07:30 PM
Wifey insists we be buried together on a plot in the town owned cemetery overlooking a tidal bay off the Kennebec River. The town charges $250.00 for the plot (2 cremains or one coffin/plot) for perpetual maintenance and you supply the headstone and the services.

That's fine if she goes first. My preference if I go first is... no autopsy, no preservation, no death cert. Roll me off the boat with some chain or an anchor attached to my ankles and get me back into the food chain as peacefully and naturally as possible. Send out private notices after the fact to the few that may remember me.

Why pay to bury yourself on land that will eventually be plowed over for a housing project? Sooner or later that's where all the preferred land will be.

Perpetual care, yeah right!

skipper68
03-22-2012, 08:13 PM
GIVE TO THE LIVING.Your body is a vessel.Sisters, Moms, Dads,SHARE to others. You wont need your eyes or kidney or liver. Give HOPE.

The Bigfella
03-22-2012, 10:38 PM
Some decades back now, I had a lot to do with all of this... sat on a Health Dept Committee, liaised with the AMA (Drs peak body), lot of media interviews, etc.

First up... when you die, your body is the property of your executor. The executor can, and sometimes has to, over-rule family members. I have elected to be an organ donor. If my executor decides otherwise... the executor wins. Doctors are very wary of going against the wishes of family, despite what the executor might say. There is debate about changing the basis of organ donation.... some want to make it the normal state of play... with an "opt out" ability (Muslims for example are very anti the concept of organ donation, by and large)

As for cardboard coffins... the late, great, Keith Russell (founder of Simplicity Funerals) tried to get them in, but failed - his big stunt for that was to paddle across the Swan River in one. Most Aussie coffins are chipboard with a paper (or thin plastic) veneer - but go to France and the legal requirement is 25mm thick solid timber. The less said about hermetically sealed bronze caskets, the better.

Cremation environmentally unfriendly? Hmmn.. there's about $10 worth of gas used per cremation. The main fuel is all that body fat you've got. It burns well. Burials tend to be far more environmentally unfriendly. Having once attended an exhumation and ended up having to help... in my best suit, I personally am not a fan of burial.... The main problem with burials from an environmental perspective is the contamination of groundwater. Its a big issue. When wild animals die, they get recycled by other animals pretty quickly - die today, you end up as crow poop or tiger poop three days later. Very environmentally friendly. For humans though, we wrap them up in a plastic bag to stew and eventually seep into the water table. Yuk. There was a Commission of Enquiry into why the average age of death in Haworth UK was half the average for the rest of the country in about 1840. Well, there was this concentrated soup, running down the hill in the water table from the cemetery to the local water supply.

Just charming eh? They were all dying of "consumption".... yep, consumption of grandma and grandpa.

SaltyD from BC
03-22-2012, 10:55 PM
Fascinating. I'm gonna grab a cheeze sandwhich be right back. lol

My will says cremate, ashes in the chuck.

hokiefan
03-22-2012, 11:22 PM
In an ideal world, let me sail east a week prior so I can be well off the coast. Then when the time comes I will sink the mighty ship as a worthy coffin. Second choice is cremation. Scatter my ashes in Wausau Sound. Reality... whatever makes my kids most comfortable. A funeral is for the living after all.

Cheers,

Bobby