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jalmberg
03-15-2012, 08:28 AM
I need to tear out the spartan accommodations in my 23' boat (one bunk, one cabinet) and built something a bit more comfy. I'm tired of sleeping in a hammock when my wife is aboard! :)

From fore to aft, I'm thinking to build:
- some storage bins and shelves in the fo'c'sle
- two bunks with some storage under/behind them
- a small galley and pantry

I've been reading the old yachting classics lately, and read in one of my F.B. Cooke books that he recommends cedar for internal construction, because it's light. This made a lot of sense to me, and sounds lots cheaper than mahogany or other yachty wood but I've never seen this recommendation anywhere else.

I'm not aiming for gold-plated construction, here... just neat and tidy, open construction for ventilation, and as inexpensive as possible.

Any wood preferences or recommendations?

J.Madison
03-15-2012, 12:04 PM
I'll be building my cabin out of cedar and fir. Fir for stringers and structure and cedar for paneling. Cedar bulkheads, berth fronts and tops, drawer faces etc... I say go for it. There are certainly more elegant woods, but who needs them?

jalmberg
03-15-2012, 01:16 PM
If it's good enough for the Maid, it's good enough for the Blue Moon.

You are probably going to use Western Red Cedar, though. I'm not sure the red cedar we have here in the east is the same, but I hope it's good enough.

Are you going to paint it?

Peter Belenky
03-15-2012, 01:29 PM
L. Francis Herreshoff in "The Common Sense of Yacht Design extolled bare ash for salty interior paneling. Francis X. Kinney, in his updated "Skene's Elements of Yacht Design" has photos of his Pipe Dream sloop, paneled in bare ash and looking gorgeous.

Bob Smalser
03-15-2012, 01:32 PM
I'll be building my cabin out of cedar and fir. Fir for stringers and structure and cedar for paneling. Cedar bulkheads, berth fronts and tops, drawer faces etc... I say go for it. There are certainly more elegant woods, but who needs them?

It'll keep the smell nice, too.

Captain Nat and Skipper may have liked ash, but the yachts they built didn't have any shortage of timely maintenance manpower when needed. Left to get damp, ash, maple and other woods prone to molding can grow to smell bad long before they develop mold spots.

jalmberg
03-15-2012, 02:21 PM
Interestingly, Mr. Cooke also said that cedar would keep the boat smelling good.

I don't have experience with too many woods, yet, but maple is one of them and from my experience, it's lousy on boats. Grows mold so fast you can watch it grow, practically.