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View Full Version : Higher Education & the GOP - a Krugman take



David G
03-10-2012, 11:26 AM
Krugman makes the case that dwindling support for higher education is part and parcel of the concerted efforts to enrich the rich:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/09/opinion/krugman-ignorance-is-strength.html?src=me&ref=general

I'd say it certainly has worked out that way, and needs to be reversed. This type of expenditure is an investment in our future as a nation, and has always paid big dividends in the past. I see no reason to believe it wouldn't again.

Dave Wright
03-10-2012, 11:33 AM
Krugman makes the case that dwindling support for higher education is part and parcel of the cencerted efforts to enrich the rich:

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Krugman probably ought to reflect that it may not be conspiracy, just simple idiocy. You don't need to look for conspiracy when you're surrounded by fools.

David G
03-10-2012, 11:58 AM
Krugman probably ought to reflect that it may not be conspiracy, just simple idiocy. You don't need to look for conspiracy when you're surrounded by fools. I agree with the thrust of your comment. Careful, though. Acting in concert is not the same as engaging in a conspiracy.

Peerie Maa
03-10-2012, 12:12 PM
I knew that one of the mistakes that Thatcher made, as part of the "Market will provide" dogma was to dismantle support for companies to provide training and apprenticeships. This conference (http://ww.cepr.org/pubs/bulletin/meets/470.htm) discussed the effects on industry.

It is often claimed that skills gaps are inevitable in the absence of government intervention, and that the UK and the US suffer from under-investment in human capital because their governments' policies do not attempt to correct market failures in this area. The German apprenticeship system and the Swedish government training programmes are cited as examples of how governments can induce employers and employees to undertake sufficient vocational training.

This human capital analysis has undoubtedly had a strong influence on UK training policy since the early 1980s. The Thatcher government, for example, abolished the Industrial Training Boards, which imposed training levies on firms and provided grants to firms providing adequate training. More recently, however, the government appears to be moving towards more recognition of market failures in training, as is implicit in the introduction of tax relief on vocational training costs in April 1992. In the rest of Europe and the US, governments are torn between a desire to subsidize training and the need to cut budget deficits.

Here is another paper discussing the same issues: http://www.skope.ox.ac.uk/sites/default/files/SKOPEWP14.pdf

Wavewacker
03-10-2012, 12:14 PM
There should be a degree progam for entrepreneurship with any specialization. The chance that one will become wealthy with any one avenue of specialization is unlikely IMO. An engineer who can not break through and promote themselves may always have a job, but few jobs will make one wealthy. My mother use to say "I don't care what you do, I just want you to try to be the very best at what you do".

Our educational system seems to be turning out more job holders for lower paying psoitions than teaching financial success and security. I do believe it's part of the bigger picture, that only a few will have greater opportunities while leaving the majority behind.

Use to be they said "you'll never get rich working for someone else" that being true in most cases, but now it's getting to be, you'll never be financially secure working for someone else.

My mother told me often about a boy friend she had in school who had a trash route and later turned out to be a multi-millionaire with a fleet of trash trucks. One could work hard everyday driving a trash truck but hard work alone won't cut it anymore, you need to work smarter, much, much smarter.

Orange
03-10-2012, 12:49 PM
Recall seeing this higher education article the other day on a professor's blog I follow. I think the problem some are finding with higher education is that it doesn't always lead to good white collar jobs any longer and yet costs keep going up placing youth further into debt. I suspect that younger generations will continue to work on ways to obtain a higher education, but at lower costs.

"More White-Collar Job Woes"
http://blogs.the-american-interest.com/wrm/2012/03/09/more-white-collar-job-woes/

snippet:


Watson’s entry into the job market (http://blogs.the-american-interest.com/wrm/2012/03/09/new-competition-for-white-collar-professionals-supercomputers/) is only the latest, clearest danger signal for white-collar jobs. The trouble has in fact been brewing for quite some time. A new study cited in The Atlantic (http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2012/03/a-lost-decade-for-young-workers/254222/) refers to the past few years as a “lost decade” for college graduates, who have seen their (inflation-adjusted) entry-level wages fall by 5.2 percent for men and 4.4 percent for women, with no recovery in sight. Many would be quick to blame this on the Great Recession, but the article points out that this trend has been around since the late 1990s.
This news is doubly bad for college-educated professionals. The drop in wages has been accompanied by a steady increase (http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=76) in college attendance costs, which have risen by 30 percent between 2000 and 2010, from an average of $13,263 per year to $17,464. Professionals are being squeezed from both sides: paying more and more for a degree that unlocks opportunities that are paying less and less. Of course, unskilled or lower-skilled workers have faced down the problems of automation and outsourcing for a long time now, but they’ve done so without the added burden of college tuition costs and student loans. In that sense, professionals are worse off than their blue-collar peers....

David G
03-10-2012, 07:24 PM
Orange,

I wonder if your post means you think it's a bad idea to invest in expanding higher education opportunities?

David G
03-10-2012, 10:37 PM
As you all know, Michigan is one state that has suffered a lot from the downturn, and from the loss of low-education/middle-class jobs. Here's an economist from Michigan talking about the work he's done investigating ways back to economic health for the state - including some thoughts on education:

http://domemagazine.com/bookit/bookit1010

David W Pratt
03-11-2012, 09:32 AM
Missing from the article is any discussion of why a high school diploma has become so worthless.

John Smith
03-11-2012, 12:02 PM
Krugman probably ought to reflect that it may not be conspiracy, just simple idiocy. You don't need to look for conspiracy when you're surrounded by fools.
I would agree with that, except the GOP seems to be against funding of any education, and Santorum calls people who believe inhigher education snobs, which would make him a snob.

John Smith
03-11-2012, 12:06 PM
Recall seeing this higher education article the other day on a professor's blog I follow. I think the problem some are finding with higher education is that it doesn't always lead to good white collar jobs any longer and yet costs keep going up placing youth further into debt. I suspect that younger generations will continue to work on ways to obtain a higher education, but at lower costs.

"More White-Collar Job Woes"


http://blogs.the-american-interest.com/wrm/2012/03/09/more-white-collar-job-woes/

snippet:
"Higer education" doesn't always mean college and white collar jobs. I can mean learning to be an electrician or a plumber.

Keith Wilson
03-11-2012, 12:16 PM
More Social Darwinism. If you didn't choose your parents wisely, screw you; I've got mine.

JimD
03-11-2012, 12:33 PM
Geez, some of yous guys are such chumps. Its over. Dontcha get it? The world of our generation is gone. Welcome to the new global reality and the new America.