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CptnDon
09-16-2000, 10:14 AM
Has anyone here had any experience with the Geodesic Airolite boats designed by Platt Monfort? I'm considering the Cartopper-9 to use as an easily lifted tender. Maybe with a trolling motor for power?

htom
09-16-2000, 11:33 AM
For all that I keep pointing people at them, I don't have one and have not used any of them. They just look neatly minimalist to me.

I have seen one of his bigger canoes a couple of times on one of the local fresh water lakes; the one time that the paddler was close enough to talk to, the conversation was brief. He was borrowing the canoe, had several of his own, and really liked it as a general purpose canoe, especially if you'd have to portage it. "Not as fragile as it looks, but not an aluminum river smasher."

Moto-man
09-16-2000, 11:09 PM
In the new issue of Boatbuilder magazine there is a article on someone who built this boat and sailed it. He seemed pleased...

Moto-man

Syd MacDonald
09-17-2000, 09:48 PM
I built a 17 and a half foot canoe using this method-pine framing and dacron covering. Took it down the Allagash river in Maine. Bounced it off a lot of rocks with no ill effects. In a stretch of quiet water I hit the end of a small stick at the surface of the water and ripped a foot long hole in the bottom. Quickly paddled the shore and patched it with contact cement and a piece of dacron and finished the trip. It only weighed about 35 pounds but could carry a full load-7 to 8 hundred pounds.

Syd MacDonald
09-17-2000, 09:49 PM
I built a 17 and a half foot canoe using this method-pine framing and dacron covering. Took it down the Allagash river in Maine. Bounced it off a lot of rocks with no ill effects. In a stretch of quiet water I hit the end of a small stick at the surface of the water and ripped a foot long hole in the bottom. Quickly paddled the shore and patched it with contact cement and a piece of dacron and finished the trip. It only weighed about 35 pounds but could carry a full load-7 to 8 hundred pounds.

Ian McColgin
09-18-2000, 09:18 AM
I rowed one at a festival at Crosby's about 15 years ago now. It was a whitehall shape about 17' and really slick.

Great way to go light. I do think it could benefit from some flotation, whether foam under the seats bow and stern or air bags or something, if you plan on handling it in rough weather.

Kermit
09-18-2000, 06:45 PM
Ian's right about floatation, but the darned things are so light you are as well off putting the floatation on yourself rather than in the boat. A couple of fenders lashed inside will do the job if you prefer. Fenders also make good anti-tippy devices tied outboard with a couple of lines running under the hull athwartships to keep them down where they need to be.

I got a paddle in a Nimrod a few years back. I was impressed. Also, I built the littlest canoe (whatzit called?) with some kids. They did well with it. It is now my wife's craft--I'm too heavy for it.

One caution: they don't seem to like contact with sharp stuff like rock or barnacles. Carry duct tape for temporary field repairs.

CptnDon
09-19-2000, 08:21 PM
Well, I ordered the plans today.
My first boat building project!
I won't start till January if I can wait that long.I'll keep everybody posted.