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Bernadette
12-25-2011, 01:23 AM
i had a run of text messages on my personal phone this morning from distant freinds wishing me a merry christmas. then i opened a couple of gifts a fellow remote nurse had sent me. i rang my parents and spoke with them for a short while. i called my girlfriend in sydney. she was at work in recovery. we had a nice chat. and my boss from thursday island called to say merry christmas. i made the day as special as i could by putting on nice clothes. it rained heavily this morning and now its quite steamy. i have done my washing and cleaned out the cats potty tray. ive spent a lot of time today sleeping because of boredom and partly because ive been unwell. and ive read myself silly. i will go for a walk at 5pm when it is a bit cooler. tonight i will make myself a bacon and egg sandwich for dinner.

one year very soon, i hope to be at anchor in a beaut little bay, surrounded with friends for christmas. :)

merry christams to all my friends here on the wbf.

bern

purri
12-25-2011, 01:30 AM
Say well mate and watch your flanks.

Portland
12-25-2011, 01:38 AM
Well Bernadette , Leyla and I had probably just as quite a Christmas.
The morning cleaning , the afternoon picking fruit and vegetables to take down to the big smoke tomorrow.
And time in front of the computer.
Yes , think of the future , on your boat , with friends for Christmas.
It won't get any better than that.
Enjoy the rest of your day.
Regards Rob J.

Bernadette
12-25-2011, 01:48 AM
rob, what sort of fruit and vegetables did you pick? are they what you have grown?

ramillett
12-25-2011, 02:33 AM
Merry Christmas and a happy New Year

Portland
12-25-2011, 02:58 AM
Bernadette we have about 60 fruit trees here , 10 mature , and 50 we have planted under cover.
Still we are picking heaps of apricots , plums , grapefruit , lots of cherries raspberries , and in the garden strawberries , fennel , potatoes , cabbages , zuccinis , cucumbers , beans , all sorts of stuff , with more coming on.
All fruit and vegetables are grown biodynamically also.
And we have chooks , ducks and geese.
And 8 retired harness horses.
And 2 dogs.
I think thats it.
The family love it , it couldn't be any fresher , and there are no herbicides fungicides pesticides or any other 'cides in their growth.
The story I like is our grandson down there in Melbourne who didn't like fruit or vegetables , as a little fella.
Last year at this time , we were down there with our fruit , and I offered him a strawberry.
I was told he doesn't like strawberries.
Well , he tried one , and liked it ('cos it tasted like none he had had before) , and finished up eating nearly a kilo !.
I had a chuckle , thinking of whoever changed the next nappy .
So yes , we have grown our own fruit and vegetables as soon as we moved in to our war service home in Macedon in 1973.
Because we got ripped off by the builder , we limited ourselves to $5 a week for food , and that went on baby food , we grew everything , meat and vegetables , and fruit.
Nothing has changed ever since.
Except now I do a fair bit of fishing , out of Portland (and give most of my catch away).
If you pull in here on your way to Hobart , I could load you up with fruit and veges.
We should be selling it I suppose , but I like giving it to people who appreciate it.
Regards Rob J.

Bernadette
12-25-2011, 03:14 AM
rob i thought by the sounds of it, that you were taking it to market but instead you are giving it away. thats great.

nah! its nice to give away fruit and vegetables. provide of course, the recipient is actually going to eat it. i know a lot of people these days will do so as many are wanting the freshness and taste of 'cide free produce. good on you.
i think a basket of produce would make a lovely gift at christmas time.

a visit to your garden would be a real pleasure, so thanks for the invite.

thank you ramillett for the christmas wishes.
its quite the unique thing to be able to speak with people from all over the world via the web.
as kids we had to wait for letters from our pen pals to arrive in the mail. that was pretty exciting stuff back then.

Portland
12-25-2011, 03:29 AM
Bernadette I've just come back in from picking 2 big bags of grapefruit to take down with us .
And Leyla is gathering all of the things she has made , for the family.
We never could afford to buy much , we always made presents , but they are always well received.
When I learnt how to catch fish , and was catching more than we needed , it was natural to give fish away to those who appreciate it.
It just feels right.
Regards Rob J.

stevebaby
12-25-2011, 05:41 AM
Bernadette we have about 60 fruit trees here , 10 mature , and 50 we have planted under cover.
Still we are picking heaps of apricots , plums , grapefruit , lots of cherries raspberries , and in the garden strawberries , fennel , potatoes , cabbages , zuccinis , cucumbers , beans , all sorts of stuff , with more coming on.
All fruit and vegetables are grown biodynamically also.
And we have chooks , ducks and geese.
And 8 retired harness horses.
And 2 dogs.
I think thats it.
The family love it , it couldn't be any fresher , and there are no herbicides fungicides pesticides or any other 'cides in their growth.
The story I like is our grandson down there in Melbourne who didn't like fruit or vegetables , as a little fella.
Last year at this time , we were down there with our fruit , and I offered him a strawberry.
I was told he doesn't like strawberries.
Well , he tried one , and liked it ('cos it tasted like none he had had before) , and finished up eating nearly a kilo !.
I had a chuckle , thinking of whoever changed the next nappy .
So yes , we have grown our own fruit and vegetables as soon as we moved in to our war service home in Macedon in 1973.
Because we got ripped off by the builder , we limited ourselves to $5 a week for food , and that went on baby food , we grew everything , meat and vegetables , and fruit.
Nothing has changed ever since.
Except now I do a fair bit of fishing , out of Portland (and give most of my catch away).
If you pull in here on your way to Hobart , I could load you up with fruit and veges.
We should be selling it I suppose , but I like giving it to people who appreciate it.
Regards Rob J.The Shakers always grew more than they needed. They ate very well but the birds ate a lot of what they laboured to grow. When this was pointed out to them, they would answer,"Well, the birds need to eat too."
Pity about the celibacy part...I could like people like that.

Portland
12-25-2011, 06:22 AM
The birds can be a problem here too .
So with the new orchard , we covered it all in netting .
The damaged fruit on the old trees we give to the geese , they love it !.
Apples go to the horses , or the chooks .
The strawberries are covered too.
Nothing is wasted.
I've been known to boil up 'couta for the chooks too.
I remember at Macedon , we used to stable between 3-6 horses there for 25 years , and had a lot of stable manure to compost .
Which we then put on the garden , the fruit trees , and the Kiwi Fruit.
We used to get an enormous amount of kiwi fruit , that I used to take to work , and give away.
They were very popular .
One day a women asked me "how come they have so much flavour , and texture ?".
My answer was "probably because they are growing in 3feet of composted horse S--t !.
It seemed to put her off them somewhat , maybe because they looked like "road apples".
Regards Rob J.

skuthorp
12-25-2011, 06:57 AM
We grow a large proportion of what we eat as well, just using the last of last years pumpkins now and this seasons are growing apace. Most of our fruit trees are a bit young for a decent crop yet, we strip a lot of fruit early on to get them established.

Interesting xmas day in Melbourne, tropical heat and humidity, big thunderstorms and rain, trees down, trains stopped, ABC initiated it's emergency broadcast service for a few hours. Even a home grown tornado.
"Wild storms packing hailstones the size of lemons and strong winds have battered Melbourne during a severe thunderstorm.Roads have been flooded and some flights have been grounded at Melbourne airport.The tornado hit Fiskville, 15 kilometres west of Bacchus Marsh, with reports its force picked cars up off the ground.It is believed another tornado also struck Melton, which was one of the worst hit areas.The weather bureau's Richard Russell says there was a tornado threat for about 20 minutes."

We had similar weather down our way Xmas eve without the hail. I think 'the wet' has hit Melbourne. Today nothing by the look of it but there is strong lightning about 50k north.

Portland
12-25-2011, 07:01 AM
I saw the result of the hailstorm damage on the news , just punched through windscreens , and fibreglass roofing .
Fiskville is in the news a lot lately , for all of the wrong reasons.
Regards Rob J.

Hwyl
12-25-2011, 08:15 AM
Happy Christmas Bernadette, that bacon sandwich sounds good.

Durnik
12-25-2011, 02:51 PM
one year very soon, i hope to be at anchor in a beaut little bay, surrounded with friends for christmas.

Aye, that's a hope many of us share.. Merry Christmas to you. I treated Kitty with tuna fish.. She's happy.. ;-)


The story I like is our grandson down there in Melbourne who didn't like fruit or vegetables , as a little fella.
Last year at this time , we were down there with our fruit , and I offered him a strawberry.
I was told he doesn't like strawberries.
Well , he tried one , and liked it ('cos it tasted like none he had had before) , and finished up eating nearly a kilo !.

Tis purely amazing the difference in taste between store produce & real fruit.. Glad he got the chance to have some of the real thing!


but I like giving it to people who appreciate it.

Guess thats why I'm not rich! ;-)


Pity about the celibacy part...I could like people like that.

Well, the Quakers come close.. tho their meetings are the opposite of the Shakers! ;-)

Merry Christmas to all, and visualize whirled peas.. ;-)

enjoy
bobby

Portland
12-25-2011, 03:08 PM
I hope your Christmas was a good one Bobby.
We are about to make the 5 hour trip down to the big smoke , for a belated Christmas , with part of our family.
You talk about not being rich , because you give away food .
How do you value wealth ?.
A genuine and appreciative "thank you" , is something money rarely buys.
We give a lot to the young couple across the road.
When they had the butcher out to process 6 lambs , guess who got a box of the best cuts !.
What goes around , comes around.
OK , time to check everything is watered , then away !.
Rob J.

Durnik
12-25-2011, 06:16 PM
I hope your Christmas was a good one Bobby.
We are about to make the 5 hour trip down to the big smoke , for a belated Christmas , with part of our family.
You talk about not being rich , because you give away food .
How do you value wealth ?.
A genuine and appreciative "thank you" , is something money rarely buys.
We give a lot to the young couple across the road.
When they had the butcher out to process 6 lambs , guess who got a box of the best cuts !.
What goes around , comes around.
OK , time to check everything is watered , then away !.
Rob J.

What goes around, comes around.. even if often from an entirely different direction! I've had what I needed in life.. Anything I want for is just that, a 'want'. When I am 'stationary' long enough (& in the correct seasons), I like to grow food.. & country, habit - if you will - is those who help pick & can, split the bounty.. Lord knows I can't eat it all myself! It works both ways. If I grow none, friends will invite me over to help & to share. Mostly, being a JOAT, I share my abilities in building/fixing/making.. Some, I get cash for.. sometimes a little, sometimes more.. truck's in good repair, I still eat.. & Kitty got her tuna.. she's happy.. ;-) Plus, I like those 'heart felt thanks' you mention.. Does a body good, as they say. Never could get into that 'gotta make a lot of money' thing.. Horrible U.S.A.ian I am! ;-)

I was wondering if the 'big smoke' you mentioned was the TN/NC or MO/AR area.. but appears you're OZ way.. & the states are _way_ more than a 5 hour road trip to visit relatives! ;-)

Also wondered about the 'flow thru' effect of the strawberries & on rereading your post, saw you had mentioned the nappies.. I took care of my grandmother one winter while my folks got a place in FL ready for her the next winter.. Introduced Grammy to organic raisins.. which she loved so much she got dehydrated.. We caught it with water.. but it created a laughing moment for a while. Speaking of good food.. She also didn't use to like yogurt, having only had commercial what passes for.. well.. some things are better left unsaid. She saw me 'enjoying' a bowl of whole milk organic yogurt with a bit of maple syrup & asked for a small bowl to try.. One tentative spoon was followed by an enthusiastic spoonful.. & a request for more.. ;-)

Christmas was good.. Re-potted some Aloes which had seriously outgrown their pots.. From two smallish to one small, one medium & one large pots.. and none are singles. Puttering on some other small tasks & taking the day easy..

Ah, yes.. I value wealth, not so much, money.. How's that saying go?
"Friends will get you thru times of no money better than money will get you thru times of no friends".. I'm 'wealthy' with friends.

Have a good trip

enjoy
bobby

Peter Malcolm Jardine
12-25-2011, 07:13 PM
Happy Christmas Bernadette!!!

StevenBauer
12-25-2011, 07:35 PM
You aren't really that far away... You're right here on my desktop. Best Christmas wishes from Maine. :)



Steven

Bernadette
12-25-2011, 08:53 PM
thats very sweet of you steven, that made me smile a BIG smile!

thank you also gareth and peter. i hope you had a nice day.

rob ive just been speaking with dad about portland. he tells me its very pretty and a great harbour. dad used to be a crayfisherman out of apollo bay but gave it up when he was washed overboard. he decided boatbuilding was safer for him and besides he had his family to think of (mum and my two brothers. i wasnt born yet). anyhow he knows the coastline down that way and tells me it would be worth my while to sail around to see you! looks like i better start buying my charts hey?!

im in the process of buying a block of land near home. i want to be able to grow fruit and vegetables. so although the block is only about 1 hectre, it should be enough t keep me in produce. it backs onto a coastal swampland and its uncleared. so i have a lot of work ahead of me. but then what else is there to do in life, other than sailing. i enjoy work and the satisfaction comes from achieving things by my own hand.

bobby, i would like to suggest a good book: "the age of absurdity. why modern life makes it hard to be happy" by michael foley. i think you would like it. its music to my ears.

seanz
12-25-2011, 09:29 PM
Far away Christmas? Skyped my family in Oz......hilarious. Too much detail to go into, but the highlight was a six year-old and a trumpet.
:)


Spent yesterday evening with my in-laws.......and it was my turn to be the BIL that drank too much. Long over-due and I really enjoyed it.
:D

Meli
12-26-2011, 01:04 AM
I'm just back from my sisters in Castlemaine.
She has about an acre planted with berries, herbs veggies etc.
She lives next to the local primary school and always leaves her surplus out for the mums and kids.

One of the lovely things about growing stuff for the love of it is the giving of it.
I lived for a while in an appartment in Salibury in england.
The lids were 5 and 9 and we had no garden.
For the princely sum of twenty pounds, we got an allotment from the council, kids dug small flower beds, made mud pies, caught (and released frogs and taddies)
The lovely thing was the older gardeners, they showed the kids how to plant, train the beans and sweet peas, build frames and we always came home with a basket of fresh raspberries lettuce and stuff.
I suppose our contribution was the company and wonder of small children.
Community gardens, should be a lot more of them.

Cheer up Bernie, another year in another place will be all the sweeter.

Durnik
12-26-2011, 03:10 AM
"the age of absurdity. why modern life makes it hard to be happy"

With a title like that, not to mention the review - music to ones ears -, how can I pass it by! esp seeing as how a quick Google shows Foley as listing Twain's "The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg", one I heartily enjoy!, as part of his inspiration.

Let me (possibly) return the favor & share his 'recommendations (http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2010/apr/20/michael-foley-top-10-absurd-classics)' with you all.. tho I can't promise the 'music', Twains, at least, will bring a laugh!


i want to be able to grow fruit and vegetables. so although the block is only about 1 hectre, it should be enough t keep me in produce. it backs onto a coastal swampland and its uncleared.

and if a hectre is 2.5 acres, you'll be able to grow fabulous quantities of wonderful foods.. Might I suggest the inclusion of fruit trees, shrubs & vines/canes.. 2.5 acres is big.. unless you're talking agribusiness.. and some goats or even a small cow can make wonderful land clearers.. & milk givers.. just sayin'.. ;-)

I'm trying to forget the "other than sailing" line.. bad girl.. no cookies! Other than sailing, indeed! ;-)


Far away Christmas? Skyped my family in Oz......hilarious. Too much detail to go into, but the highlight was a six year-old and a trumpet.

Skype, the 'net & cells do make the world a smaller place.. and that might just be a _good_ thing.. A trumpet? over a 'net connection? boggles the mind.. ;-)



One of the lovely things about growing stuff for the love of it is the giving of it.
I lived for a while in an appartment in Salibury in england.
The lids were 5 and 9 and we had no garden.
For the princely sum of twenty pounds, we got an allotment from the council, kids dug small flower beds, made mud pies, caught (and released frogs and taddies)
The lovely thing was the older gardeners, they showed the kids how to plant, train the beans and sweet peas, build frames and we always came home with a basket of fresh raspberries lettuce and stuff.
I suppose our contribution was the company and wonder of small children.

One of my many & varied 'jobs' was tending a flower garden for an old lady whose eyes had gone bad, but she still liked the colors & aromas.. I told folks I was being paid to sit on the ground & play in the dirt.. an enjoyable pastime for someone who isn't driven to make a buck.. I figure I helped make an old lady's last few years more pleasurable, and that, too, is a good thing.. even if I didn't make too many mud pies.. ;-)


Community gardens, should be a lot more of them.

Can I get an Amen on that!

.. I still get a kick out of the 'lids'.. ;-)


Happy Day After Christmas!

enjoy
bobby

Bernadette
12-26-2011, 03:15 AM
hey meli,
im ok. just wish i was elsewhere :D.

bobby, yes a hectre is 2.5 acres. i did have a block of that size when i built 'pequot". it was massive and took a whole weekend busting our guts mowing it.
this time around, i want a block i can clear as i need. i am planning on growing everything and anything. some things i wont eat, these i may trade. i hadnt thought of a cow. i have a prefence for a goat however. i dont use cow's milk. i was actually hoping to eventaully get myself a horse. mostly for transport back to mission beach. this will slow my life up to a steadier pace. a pace more in tune with how i want to live. the land is exactly 1 km from the boat ramp to the river i want to moor my new yacht on. the entrance from my intended mooring is 3.5 nm. im workiing towards all of this bit by bit.

skuthorp
12-26-2011, 04:41 AM
We've got 2.7 acres and even though about half is a maze of scrub, little creeks and some big trees we have plenty of room for a large vege garden and about 20 fruit trees including a heritage apple walk of 10 trees (I'd have to go and check what sort). We keep another couple in green vege's, the fruit trees are a bit young, some only in this year. No livestock, there are too many rare plants on the place for that.

Durnik
12-26-2011, 10:29 PM
hey meli,
im ok. just wish i was elsewhere :D.

bobby, yes a hectre is 2.5 acres. i did have a block of that size when i built 'pequot". it was massive and took a whole weekend busting our guts mowing it.
this time around, i want a block i can clear as i need. i am planning on growing everything and anything. some things i wont eat, these i may trade. i hadnt thought of a cow. i have a prefence for a goat however. i dont use cow's milk. i was actually hoping to eventaully get myself a horse. mostly for transport back to mission beach. this will slow my life up to a steadier pace. a pace more in tune with how i want to live. the land is exactly 1 km from the boat ramp to the river i want to moor my new yacht on. the entrance from my intended mooring is 3.5 nm. im workiing towards all of this bit by bit.

Sounds like a plan.. & a good one at that!

The thing about cows & goats most people don't think of is they are browsers.. leaves, twigs & such being more their 'natural' diet. Both can wipe out a stand of brier in no time flat - ever taste the tender young leaves? MM, good! Or notice how trees in a cow pasture have no leaves/branches within reach of their mouths.. They're candy to a bovine. Even putting a young steer (often the cheapest to buy), or a young female & not breeding her, in the field just to clear it & then moving them on if there is a lack of room will save you much work.. and leave precious brown patties behind. Keeping one keeps those patties coming.. Goats, IMHO, do not deserve their reputation for indiscriminate eating.. Indiscriminate taste testing.. yes, eating, no.. ;-) Cows, start at point A & proceed to point B, eating everything in between.. clear a piece much faster, they do! But, if a goat does what you need, than a goat is better! Keeping in mind that while a steer is relatively odor free.. even a neutered goat will pee all over himself & stink up a storm.. Doe's are better. Again.. IMHO.. ;-) I have a friend (make that two..) who like their bucks as much as their does.. go figure.. Since I am a fan of raw cows milk, my choice is easy.. ;-)

Good luck with your dream.. I might borrow most of it for me-self! never have done much with horses.. ;-)

Skuthorp, I completely understand the problem with livestock & rare or delicate plants.. Cows need limits, & goats don't understand them.. I'd much rather live with a neighbor having the cow.. and trade for milk. But to clear a plot.. I've done that by hand.. Give me the cow. I'll get me a hammock, or a sailboat on a creek mooring.. Damn, that sounds good!

enjoy
bobby

Bernadette
12-27-2011, 12:35 AM
bobby
well i reckon i will have to do a lot of homework before i consider getting either a cow or a goat. i like both animals but i know next to nothing about them. and i also like trees and native wildlife of which there is already plenty on the block im considering. for starters theres the cassowaries. but ive seen them cross open fields and cow pastures. i would only keep a cow or a goat if it was penned and im not sure i can really afford the space. there are plenty of cows around still happily grazing away (well, until the developers get in and buy up all the land for housing) so maybe someone in the district is already selling goats milk etc. i particularly like goats cheese and fetta. not being a big fan of dairy, the goat products seem to appeal to my palate for some reason.
i like chooks too!

the biggest problem with all of this is that there just doesnt seem to be enough time in life to do everything! i like the idea of having my own place as ive always been semi nomadic. firstly as a military spouse and now, with my line of work. i want to someday be part of a neighbourhood community that nourishes the land and feeds directly from it. going to local markets and sourcing all manner of goods from other like minded people.

Durnik
12-27-2011, 09:27 PM
>as ive always been semi nomadic.

Aye, that's been my life too. Strangely enough, my hitch in the military created probably the most stable period, 3 whole years at one base.. hell, it was. ;-) I've built & played in gardens at many places thru the years.. bet some still look good. But I've moved on, still looking for a similar community. It appears there's a lot of us out there, having trouble meeting!

as an alternative to penning, one can fence in the garden areas & property perimeter & let the critters roam. 'Chooks', too. They'll fly in the gardens, but keep down the pests while doing very little damage.. & I can eat a 'mater, pepper or cuke with a few pecks in it. ;-) - plus, I'll eat eggs every day if I have them!

your dream sounds nice, so many options.. I really like the "sailboat 'round the corner" part.. ain't life grand!

long day for me.. it's beddie bye time, gotta get up & do it again, amen.. thanks for a nice thread. Manana.

enjoy
bobby

purri
12-27-2011, 10:40 PM
^ On the subject of only penning chooks. Ever seen a goanna?

Portland
12-28-2011, 02:50 AM
Bernadette , you telling of your father being washed overboard out of Apollo Bay was a surprise .
I was helping deliver a boat from Portland to Melbourne about a year ago , and the first day we got to Apollo Bay.
The owner of the boat , an Olver , fished for many years out of Apollo Bay , as did his father and brother . As we were getting to Apollo bay just on daybreak , he was telling me of his mates that had drowned , or been swept overboard , whatever , around Apollo Bay.
Ask dad if he remembers any Olver's .
They are still fishing , out of Portland.
And to the gardening , yep , go for it !.
Lots of research needed , you have to find out from locals what will grow there , start small , but plan ahead.
As to a horse , yep , get yourself a harness horse !.
A good sensible crossbred type will get you and your clobber to Mission Beach and back easily , any day.
And work your land for you.
I've just came back from a drive through the Wombat Forest , and the Macedon Ranges , where I drove horses 200-300 kms at least , every week , for 40 years.
And yes , I used them also on feeding out , ploughing , harrowing , dragging a sled full of wood.
In the garden , for ploughing and scuffling.
But mostly just for going from A to B , and enjoying the journey.
If you just want to turn up a bit of ground , or drag around small logs , plus get milk , and offspring to grow out , something like a Devon cow would do the trick also .
If you ever get serious about working horses or cattle , I've got all you need here.
I've also done 2 cheesemaking courses , there are probably courses available in FNQ.They would be a big help .
The biggest thing is hygiene , so you would have a start there.
A couple of quality dairy goats will give you all of the milk you need , and still raise kids.
Keeping the kids on them is good , because it means you can go away , and the kids look after the milking.
Cruise around your new place , find the gardeners , find the dairy goat keepers , and listen to their experiences.
But , if you are keen and observant , I can't see anything to stop you.
Regards Rob J.

Bernadette
12-28-2011, 03:23 AM
oh wow rob, a crossbred type...that sounds exciting! a harness horse....! ive always wanted to use a horse for transport. i dont know the distance from my intended block of land and mission beach proper, but in my ignorance i would say it wouldnt be too far for a horse. plus i can also go the other way into tully for big shopping excursions! i will google it and let you know.

i recently tried to do the creb track on my trail bike but failed due to injury and being just plain beat trying to keep up with the men. anyhow, i figured i would much prefer to do the 7km track by horse! taking a couple of days just plodding along. nice and quiet and the horse will not falter on any of the very steep hills. that to me if far more adventuresome. people have told me i cant do it beacuase the horse needs to carry its own feed. i couldnt comment on that.

i have also wanted to use a horse to plough the ground and use 'him' around the yard to tow rubbish etc.

dad only fished apollo bay for a short period. he has relations there by the name of leorke and ovens. when im home next im going to start taking an oral history of dad's boatbuilding life. he has led a very full and interesting life.

hey rick, a german shepherd got into my chooks many years ago. i was not happy. my own german shepherd killed a neigbours white bunny! we had tufts of white fur all over the front lawn. had to quickly pick them up so as not to let onto the owner. i think the dog ate the whole rabbit. we didnt find any fleshy bits!!!

bobby ive learnt through hard work, that if you want something in life, you have to work hard for it! before i built "pequot" i had her sail plan pinned to a wall and i would look at it each day. from that little bit of self motivation, ive always been a driven woman. ive achieved what ive set out to do each time. perhpas not in the planned time frame but none-the-less, ive got ahead through dogged determination. my plans for the future are what i want to do so that as i grow older (a long time yet!!!!!) i am going to be able to look after myself as im now a single woman again with no children.

there is much contenment in living a simple life.

Portland
12-28-2011, 03:47 AM
OK Bernadette , you need to read this book http://www.gould.com.au/My-Bloods-Country-Journey-Australias-p/lahc428.htm . That will tell you what a woman can do with a horse.
Or check out the endurance rides and drives.
Something I've mentioned before I'm sure , but I had a 11 km track at Macedon I used to drive a lot . It had at least 5 water courses to cross (depending on the season) , some steep hills , and a cliff to drive over.
I had a standing bet going for 20 years + with all comers , that I could beat any motorised vehicle or bike around the track . Many tried , bikes , trikes , quad bikes , 4x4 , but none could get through the swampy bits.
But the horses and ponies could , pulling me and a passenger , in a cart.
I've got the photos to prove it.
Up your way , probably a good old Australian Draught would be the way to go.
But the best bet would be to get a well broke type with a bit of age on him , and let him teach you.
Don't worry about looks , as long as it does the job.
Ask around , find the people WHO WORK their horses. If you go someplace to check out a horse , look for used work implements .
If you only see a brake (used to start a horse in harness) be on your guard.
If you go to a place to check out a horse , and you see well used implements , and the old horse you check out maybe has scars from girth galls etc , then he is a worker , and as an inexperienced horse person , thats the bloke you want.
Regards Rob J.

StevenBauer
12-28-2011, 09:42 AM
Hey Bern, have you seen Frank Hurley's old photos from the Torres Straits and PNG? From the early 1920s. The Australian Museum has them online. Amazing images.

http://australianmuseum.net.au/search/?Keyword=Hurley&new=1&x=0&y=0


Steven

Durnik
12-28-2011, 01:06 PM
> ^ On the subject of only penning chooks. Ever seen a goanna?

Hey Purri, when I say "let them run free", I do _not_ mean "don't provide shelter". The best hen house I ever saw/used is a smallish shed w/ a human sized door on one side & a hole, say 1' square, 4' up, on the other, the hole being surrounded by sheet metal flashing. The birds can fly in & out evenings & mornings, but climbing critters can't get a purchase on the flashing. Works well here, might be good there, too. Day time, roosters have 2 jobs.. fertilizing the hens & keeping watch for predators. Best to have two good roosters, one to keep watch & the other to keep him honest, eh? ;-)

but no, never seen a goanna.. however, my pal google (https://www.google.com/search?client=ubuntu&channel=fs&q=goanna&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8) has. ;-) I take it they like eggs & maybe chickens too? I'd probably add a flange to the tin flashing to make climbing more difficult. Around here, 'possums, coons & snakes are the most common predators.




>there is much contenment in living a simple life.

Yea Bernadette, Ain't that the truth.

>before i built "pequot" i had her sail plan pinned to a wall and i would look at it each day. from that little bit of self motivation

For the last month or so, I've had the may/june '99' issue of Wooden Boat with Eun Na Mara (http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?62474-Eun-Mara-construction-pictures&p=1519951#post1519951)open to that article on the counter. Thinking stretched a bit, maybe quite a bit (I'm 6'1", 195 lbs), say 28' w/ an 8' beam, and the rig pretty much left alone. It's looking clearer, & sweeter, all the time.. ;-) My biggest concern is my nomadic life, I already pull a travel trailer, where will she go? Ah, well, all things work out. For now, it's a canoe on top of the truck. ;-)




>The Australian Museum (http://australianmuseum.net.au/search/?Keyword=Hurley&new=1&x=0&y=0) has them online. Amazing images.

Cool, Steven - wild pictures, check out the 'wooden boat (http://australianmuseum.net.au/Transfer/ToGalleryItem/?id=12735&path=image/Repairing-sailing-canoes-Mailu-Island-Amazon-Bay-PNG)'. ;-)

enjoy
bobby