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Larks
12-19-2011, 05:32 AM
This just came through in an email and I've not heard it before but it does sound like a nice simple way to remove ticks and we do get quite a few here at this time of year.

However, we've always been told not to put anything on ticks because it causes them to inject a poison so I'm wondering if anyone else may have heard of this?? Or is it just another way to spread rubbish emails that are meant to annoy the crap out of you with the "please forward this....." BS and open you up to hacking?

Tick removal
Spring will be here soon and the ticks will soon be showing their heads.
Here is a good way to get them off you, your children, or your pets.
Give it a try.
Please forward to anyone with children... Or hunters or dogs, or anyone
Who even steps outside in summer!!
A School Nurse has written the info below -- good enough to share --
And it really works!!

I had a paediatrician tell me what she believes is the best way to remove a tick.
This is great, because it works in those places where it's some times difficult
To get to with tweezers: between toes, in the middle of a head full of dark hair, etc.

Apply a glob of liquid soap to a cotton ball. Cover the tick with the soap-soaked
cotton ball and swab it for a few seconds (15-20), the tick will come out on its own
And be stuck to the cotton ball when you lift it away.
This technique has worked every time I've used it (and that was frequently),
And it's much less traumatic for the patient and easier for me.
Unless someone is allergic to soap, I can't see that this would be damaging in any way.
I even had my doctor's wife call me for advice because she had one stuck to her back
And she couldn't reach it with tweezers. She used this method and immediately called
Me back to say, "It worked!"

PeterSibley
12-19-2011, 05:37 AM
For shell backs fingernails and panic work well for me Greg. For the tiny first stage, the grass ticks I use ''Rid'' or finger nails and panic .

But I'll try your suggested method with the kids ...it might be less traumatic.

WX
12-19-2011, 05:48 AM
Sounds worth a try. If they are big enough for fingers then that's what I use but for the nymphs I use Lavender oil...and it smells nice.:)

Andrew Craig-Bennett
12-19-2011, 05:49 AM
They don't inject a poison as such; they regurgitate their stomach through their mouth into the bloodstream and the contents are rather likely to be infected with something (Lyme disease if you are unlucky) For practical purposes,a distinction without a difference!

Another method, where you can get at the tick, is to rub it gently in a circular motion; after about half a minute it may feel giddy and pull out.

Larks
12-19-2011, 05:53 AM
Another method, where you can get at the tick, is to rub it gently in a circular motion; after about half a minute it may feel giddy and pull out.

Are you sure the tickling doesn't just give them the giggles and make them fall off in hysterics?

RFNK
12-19-2011, 05:55 AM
http://medent.usyd.edu.au/fact/ticks.htm

Rick

WX
12-19-2011, 06:00 AM
ACB, we have what are called Shellbacks or Paralysis Ticks. These little buggers can kill a cat , a dog or a cow, if left on too long. They can also make a Human quite sick or in a very short time cause painful swelling. I get them out asap and I wouldn't go rubbing one while it was on me...no matter how gently.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
12-19-2011, 06:10 AM
Reason no 27 for Not Moving to Australia (Reasons 1- 26 are also vertebrate and invertebrate fauna...the humans are fine...) ;)

WX
12-19-2011, 06:13 AM
Wait till we start discussing, leeches, Bullants, Jumping ants and these big brown spiders that seem to be taking over.

botebum
12-19-2011, 06:15 AM
Here's what our pediatrician said- Just pinch them out slowly, trying to get the head with the body. Clean the area well with peroxide and keep an eye on it. If there is redness or swelling after a day or two then see the doctor. Do not put a hot (blown out) match on it to make it back out. You can drown him out with oils or liquid soap but that could take a few hours and may or may not work. The longer a tick is on you, the more the chances of contracting a tick borne disease.

So, do you want to sit around with a tick hanging off of you for a few hours to see if he drops off or do you just want to get rid of the thing and go about your business?

Some may remember that I had RMSF a few years ago. Not fun.

Doug

RFNK
12-19-2011, 06:20 AM
OK, black snake, brown snake, tiger snake, taipan, king brown, western taipan, dugite, red back, funnel web, blue-ringed octopus, stonefish, irikanji, box jellyfish, bull shark, white pointer, tiger shark, crocodile, tick, bluebottle, bull rout, stingray, and various other snakes, spiders and shark species I can't think of the names of. 26 might be generous!

Rick

RFNK
12-19-2011, 06:21 AM
Wait till we start discussing, leeches, Bullants, Jumping ants and these big brown spiders that seem to be taking over.

What big brown spiders?

Rick

PS There's only one ant that counts

Ian McColgin
12-19-2011, 07:34 AM
The liquid detergent method works the same way as the oil method in that it blocks what amounts or respiration through the tick's body. I think it's a little more skin-friendly than petrolium oils, but not much different than plant and animal oils. It appears that liquid detergent spreads itself around the tick's body better than oils and so is perhaps more effective. Even though it's rather thin, I like to use Dr Bronners since it's violent peppermint burn at full strength both panics the tick and makes the bite area feel instantly better.

Steve McMahon
12-19-2011, 07:51 AM
Excellent info. Thanks for sharing. I have always used tweezers, but I can see that this could be a good method. I have tried vasoline, but it was hard to apply and when I did resort to tweezers it was a slimy mess. We have two kinds of ticks: wood ticks - larger black ones that do not carry any disease, and the smaller deer tick - greyish colour, and with the potential of carrying Lyme disease.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
12-19-2011, 07:56 AM
OK, black snake, brown snake, tiger snake, taipan, king brown, western taipan, dugite, red back, funnel web, blue-ringed octopus, stonefish, irikanji, box jellyfish, bull shark, white pointer, tiger shark, crocodile, tick, bluebottle, bull rout, stingray, and various other snakes, spiders and shark species I can't think of the names of. 26 might be generous!

Rick

I remember including the cane toad when I made up my list of 26, non-lethal, just vile, but I don't think I included the drop bear!

Mrleft8
12-19-2011, 08:18 AM
I just lop off what ever they're biting...... Why do you think they call me "Lefty"?
Nail polish works, as does 90% rubbing alcohol. My mother used to use wooden matches, or borrow a friend's lit cigarette.
In the long run, I think finger nails or fine tweezers work the best.

SMARTINSEN
12-19-2011, 08:55 AM
.
In the long run, I think finger nails[...] work the best.Probably.



Here is a picture of the best remover that I have found, nothing else that I have tried compares.

http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR6VRFEuigPt0uHJASeli0exCP-vOKI_i__PvRg59jKWkH0x6OZ

I am unafraid to use DEET, it is the most effective, and eliminates 99 percent of the problem in the first place.

spirit
12-19-2011, 09:19 AM
The CDC says unequivocally to use tweezers instead of chemicals:

http://www.cdc.gov/ticks/removing_a_tick.html

Jim Ledger
12-19-2011, 09:25 AM
The Platypus.

Mrleft8
12-19-2011, 10:18 AM
How does one use a platypus to remove ticks? They take one look at a duck billed, web footed, beaver tailed, egg laying, fur bearing muskrat and fall off laughing? :D

George Jung
12-19-2011, 11:57 AM
The advantage of a fine point tweezers is that you can grasp the tick near the head. Do so without crushing it, and apply traction sufficient to tent the skin - and wait. Generally,

if you haven't applied too much force, the tick will 'disengage', removing the embedded mouthpiece, as well. Grasping the tick by the body is to be avoided - by doing so, you are

essentially injecting your tissues with the gi contents of the tick, something to be avoided.

callsign222
12-19-2011, 12:48 PM
The CDC says unequivocally to use tweezers instead of chemicals:

http://www.cdc.gov/ticks/removing_a_tick.html

+1

Petroleum jelly, soap, etc etc-- all mythical ideas that won't get it off any faster and in some cases may actually encourage disease transmission through regurgitation. Get the tick off as soon as possible, gently, without crushing the body, using small tweezers. Take your time. Sometimes it takes 10min or so for it to release. Gentle pressure.

Todd D
12-19-2011, 01:46 PM
We generally douse them with a bit of hydrogen peroxide. They let go very quickly when you do that and it sterilizes the bite.

Mrleft8
12-19-2011, 02:33 PM
I almost always tear up a small patch of skin when removing a tick. I figure a little out flowing blood at the site can only help. Tick disposal?..... The term I use would get howls of politically correct objection so I won't say it, but ticks around here get thrown in the woodstove, summer or winter, and they burn. Big ones pop when exposed to open flame.

David W Pratt
12-19-2011, 04:26 PM
I have always just grabbed them and pulled (yanked) them off.
But I did get Lyme disease once. Woke up on the Vinyard Race w a stiff shoulder, that lasted for a few weeks, then a stiff neck, again a few weeks, finally, just before Thanksgiving, my left wrist swelled up. Went to the MD, he scratched his head, drew blood, gave me an ANSAID, called in a week, said it was Lyme. A month on penicillin and I've been fine ever since.

RFNK
12-19-2011, 05:12 PM
How does one use a platypus to remove ticks? They take one look at a duck billed, web footed, beaver tailed, egg laying, fur bearing muskrat and fall off laughing? :D

Ha! You're just jealous! Just because our fauna are more efficient! We don't need a whole fleet of cartoon-inspired wildlife, we just have one that summarises the rest.

Only the male has the spike.

Rick

Fitz
12-19-2011, 08:11 PM
Pick a tick off the dog the other day and dropped it in the dish pan full of soapy water. I was surprised to see it kill the tick quick.

pipefitter
12-19-2011, 09:12 PM
Dawn dish detergent sure knocks the fleas and ticks off of the dog. I think I read somewhere that there is something in it that actually does kill them. It works better than most of the flea soaps I have tried. With the dedicated, over the counter flea shampoos, the fleas would still be alive in the tub for awhile. With the Dawn, not so much. Also, there was less skin irritation with the Dawn. I use it diluted 50/50 with water. When I told the vet that the flea shampoos were causing skin irritation, he suggested trying Dawn, which is typically what they use with other animals in distress from the oil spills etc. Seemed to make sense.

WX
12-19-2011, 09:39 PM
What big brown spiders?

Rick

PS There's only one ant that counts
The last few years has seen an increase in these spiders that are similar to Huntsmans but smaller. When they run they tend to jump as well. I quite often find them in folded tarps.
Possibly this one.
http://www.findaspider.org.au/find/spiders/442.htm

botebum
12-19-2011, 10:24 PM
The advantage of a fine point tweezers is that you can grasp the tick near the head. Do so without crushing it, and apply traction sufficient to tent the skin - and wait. Generally,

if you haven't applied too much force, the tick will 'disengage', removing the embedded mouthpiece, as well. Grasping the tick by the body is to be avoided - by doing so, you are

essentially injecting your tissues with the gi contents of the tick, something to be avoided.If I'm not mistaken, this dude is a doctor ... oops, Doctor. I might just listen to him and play it off what my daughter's Ped. said and work out what works for me.

Doug

Doug

brad9798
12-19-2011, 10:32 PM
Ped and said, doug?

brad9798
12-19-2011, 10:34 PM
nevermind ... you sound very coherent, tonight! :D

George Jung
12-19-2011, 10:36 PM
I've enjoyed this thread (and others like it).

When I stop talking, and listen, I learn all sorts of new things!

aeronca52
12-19-2011, 11:12 PM
Just an out loud thought but how would CA glue work on a tick? Just a drop on the bug it self, not your skin. Perhaps it would seal off all air and kill it and it would drop off by itself.