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callsign222
12-07-2011, 08:18 PM
This will be quite a niche subject, so apologies but I don't know where else to ask with an audience that has a such a worldly scope:

I have a beloved earthenware tart pan from the Bourgogne region of France that is glazed inside and unglazed along the bottom. It produces some beautiful tarts with perfectly evenly cooked crusts and I love it. It has an 11" or so diameter, a little wider than the standard 9" American pie pan, but not the full 12"/30cm pie pans of Europe-- so I can carefully stretch American 9" refrigerated doughs when I'm feeling lazy and don't want to make my own and have them fit.

I dropped it last week and my wife found a crack down a flute extending into the pan.

My local potter told me I was SOL, be careful with it and hope for the best. I am hunting for a replacement, but I can only find ceramic replacements that are glazed topside and underside, and they are the wrong size.

Anyone know what this is officially called or where I could find some? Google searches are not working. Anyone steeped in French cookware or anyone with local knowledge from Bourgogne (Burgundy) who can point me in the right direction? I'm not going back to Switzerland for at least 6 months if not more, and it's going to be a long winter without my myriad of yummy tarts to keep my company...

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-qlzo2ihLkRg/TuAPTSE-54I/AAAAAAAACDs/ZW39_C-Gyyw/s640/IMG_1733.JPG

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-zgLgZjqIUXY/TuAPT2mfXuI/AAAAAAAACDw/ZAOo-gH5Z80/s640/IMG_1734.JPG

Ian McColgin
12-07-2011, 08:26 PM
Your local potter can't make one? Or better yet, make a casting and do a line. Should give you the first one for turning him on to a winner.

callsign222
12-07-2011, 08:38 PM
Your local potter can't make one? Or better yet, make a casting and do a line. Should give you the first one for turning him on to a winner.

Haha, great idea, and this is already my plan C. Plan A: Find one online, B: Wait until I head back to Switzerland and swing into France (I'm near the border) and hunt around, C: Local potter. My local potter is awesome and does great work but he commands a price that is out of my reach for the time being.

Shang
12-07-2011, 08:40 PM
What Ian said.
It's likely that the subsequent pans will be slightly smaller than your prototype because of the shrinkage of the clay, which might simplify the crust-size problem.

By the way, am I the only one who is having trouble not making lewd remarks about French tarts?

callsign222
12-07-2011, 08:46 PM
I like the crust-size problem-- 9" is not wide enough, I like a good 12" personally, this is a good compromise if I want to use store bought (happening more and more regularly). I have a 12" tin French tart pan, but I love this earthenware. Remember it is shallow.

C'mon someone must be able to tease this out of the Google, somewhere.

Feel free to make lewd remarks. I'm all about French tarts. They have firm assets and are slightly salty with beautiful brunette toppings.

Tom Montgomery
12-07-2011, 09:04 PM
Emile Henry makes an 11-inch ceramic tart pan. There are other manufacturers of ceramic pans in this size. An email inquiry should inform you about the level of finish on the bottom of the pan.

Good luck in your search.

SMARTINSEN
12-07-2011, 09:15 PM
There are other manufacturers of ceramic pans in this size.

Try Le Creuset, they are French, and make this sort of thing.

Edit to add, we have one very similar, and I would be SOL if I broke it. SWMBO calls this a quiche pan, if that will help in the search

Shang
12-07-2011, 09:32 PM
Ici, c'est une tarte assez français

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f93/shangboat/Yvette-Horner-K7-Audio-Balade-Dans-Paris-La-Reine-Du-Tour-De-France-Made-In-Normandie-Mademoiselle-From-Armentieres-Paris-Canaille-Paris-En-.jpg

callsign222
12-07-2011, 09:37 PM
Tom, Thank you very much. Emile Henry has cornered the online Burgundy Clay market it seems, and their Quiche dishes (http://www.emilehenryusa.com/Quiche.html?parentId=410&pushParent)are pretty close to what I have and straight from Burgundy. My search terms were way off (tarte, tart, earthenware, crockery, Bourgogne, etc), you just solved what took me an hour+. Not sure about the bottom glazing, but if mine cracks all the way this would be a great place to start my replacement. I'm sure it would be fine.

Smart- Thank you, but Creuset, while decent, makes their tarte pans in Asia, and I like to support the home manufacturing team as much as possible. Finnicky.


PHEW! Winter saved.

callsign222
12-07-2011, 09:41 PM
Une troupe des filles Francaises!!!

http://www.dailyartfixx.com/wp-content/gallery/henri-de-toulouse-lautrec/la-troupe-de-mlle-eglantine-large.jpg

Tom Montgomery
12-07-2011, 09:43 PM
My pleasure. ;) :)

seanz
12-07-2011, 09:50 PM
Glad you got it sorted out. Personally I'm a bit disappointed. I had such high hopes when I read the title. Thought you might have got ensnarred in a blancmange dispensing trebuchet.
:)

perldog007
12-07-2011, 10:10 PM
Not much for baking but this poster (poseur?) has done some cooking over the last half century. My advice would be to retire the cracked dish. Buy the best substitute you can find and learn to live with it's quirks until you can get another one. Perhaps expand your forum universe?

Can the nice folks in yodellandia fax, email, ftp, or even better UPS you a replacement?

sucks to have a piece like that damaged, but better to have loved and lost.... At least that's what I keep telling myself regarding my farberware stock pots and saute pans that grew legs whilst I was hospitalized. :)

Does look like a lovely piece of kit. I use a round stoneware/hoopydoopy/pamperedchef/asseenontv apparatus on the oven rack to bake directly on and sometimes under a pan to regulate bottom/top heat ratios along with the usual skulduggery tricks of tin foil, pans of water, yada yada.

I'm pretty confident that if you get a close replacement and bang your head against the wall long enough your tart situation will recover. Best of luck. If I see anything like that at a yard sale I'll let you know.

By tomorrow every wino and crackhead in my area will have a pic of that on their phone. Onward.

callsign222
12-07-2011, 10:35 PM
Not much for baking but this poster (poseur?) has done some cooking over the last half century. My advice would be to retire the cracked dish. Buy the best substitute you can find and learn to live with it's quirks until you can get another one.

Good advice.


Perhaps expand your forum universe?

Don't have the time or inclination or patience to find one with a relatively mature *ahem* crowd. (is there a forum for nose-pickers?)


At least that's what I keep telling myself regarding my farberware stock pots and saute pans that grew legs whilst I was hospitalized. :)

This sucks and I would not be as relaxed as you were if my cast iron collection walked off.


By tomorrow every wino and crackhead in my area will have a pic of that on their phone. Onward.

WTF does this mean? Should I be scared? Is this a good thing or a bad thing?

Tom Montgomery
12-07-2011, 10:54 PM
You must excuse peridoggy. He is much more accustomed to the Bilge political brawls and founders a bit when attempting to engage in civilized conversation.

seanz
12-07-2011, 11:05 PM
Yeah, this is French cooking we're talking about......surrender to the flavor.

perldog007
12-07-2011, 11:15 PM
Good advice.



Don't have the time or inclination or patience to find one with a relatively mature *ahem* crowd. (is there a forum for nose-pickers?)



This sucks and I would not be as relaxed as you were if my cast iron collection walked off.



WTF does this mean? Should I be scared? Is this a good thing or a bad thing?

This is a good thing. Winos and crackheads are constantly trying to make money to support their proclivities. So if any of them come across something like that they will endeavor to acquire it. Since they deal in economies of six packs, half pints, and small scores that means affordable acquisition.

If one comes up 'round here I'll p.m. you. It's a good thing. Don't mind Tom Montgomery. He likes to lash out at me because he thinks I'm right wing.

ETA - not too many folks around here haven't had some crab or catfish from my dory. I'll just tell the "committee" that I need one for another boat guy. if one's around, they'll find it. :D

seanz
12-07-2011, 11:17 PM
We know you ain't right.

:D

perldog007
12-07-2011, 11:22 PM
We know you ain't right.

:D

Excellent! I was starting to worry about general comprehension issues :D But seriously the "fellas" come up with stuff now and then.

Like my tortilla press. I know I can use boards or books but darn it I wanted one. Darned if Fred the three wheeled wino didn't find me one. Fred only grudgingly accepted a half pint of Lord Calvert for that score.

So if I can find a quiche/tart cookery gadget for a half pint of rotgut it won't matter how insane I am, it's still a score.

JBreeze
12-07-2011, 11:29 PM
Just in time for their warehouse sale........Newcastle, DE

http://www.emilehenryusa.com/cookware-sale/warehouse-sale2011-4.jpg

katey
12-07-2011, 11:37 PM
Like my tortilla press. I know I can use boards or books but darn it I wanted one. Darned if Fred the three wheeled wino didn't find me one.


Oh really? Well then, Fred....I'm looking for a burrito-sized tortilla press. Not one of those itsy-bitsy six-inchers!

elf
12-08-2011, 12:16 AM
I'm afraid I don't get the Farberware comment. I thought Farberwear was cheap imitation Revere ware.

As for Le Creuset, it was always poorly designed compared to Copco.

perldog007
12-08-2011, 12:38 AM
I'm afraid I don't get the Farberware comment. I thought Farberwear was cheap imitation Revere ware.

As for Le Creuset, it was always poorly designed compared to Copco.

It might be, they have put out some decent pots and pans for commercial use. I've seen the brand on some dollar store looking stuff at WalMart as well.

perldog007
12-08-2011, 12:38 AM
Oh really? Well then, Fred....I'm looking for a burrito-sized tortilla press. Not one of those itsy-bitsy six-inchers!

Fred is still trying to find that one for me. We're over here eating itsy bitsy burritos :D

Chip-skiff
12-08-2011, 12:57 AM
It looks like terracotta with a dipped glaze— bottom left plain. There are huge quantities of similar pots sold in Spain as cazuelas and in North Africa as tagines, but I've not seen one with the fluted rim. One precautionary measure with this sort of pot is to soak it in water for a bit before each use— makes it less brittle.

There are quite a few ceramic tart pans available, but most are either porcelain or stoneware, which tend to heat up less evenly than terracotta.

Meli
12-08-2011, 01:10 AM
This will be quite a niche subject, so apologies but I don't know where else to ask with an audience that has a such a worldly scope:

I have a beloved earthenware tart pan from the Bourgogne region of France that is glazed inside and unglazed along the bottom. It produces some beautiful tarts with perfectly evenly cooked crusts and I love it. It has an 11" or so diameter, a little wider than the standard 9" American pie pan, but not the full 12"/30cm pie pans of Europe-- so I can carefully stretch American 9" refrigerated doughs when I'm feeling lazy and don't want to make my own and have them fit.

I dropped it last week and my wife found a crack down a flute extending into the pan.

My local potter told me I was SOL, be careful with it and hope for the best. I am hunting for a replacement, but I can only find ceramic replacements that are glazed topside and underside, and they are the wrong size.

Anyone know what this is officially called or where I could find some? Google searches are not working. Anyone steeped in French cookware or anyone with local knowledge from Bourgogne (Burgundy) who can point me in the right direction? I'm not going back to Switzerland for at least 6 months if not more, and it's going to be a long winter without my myriad of yummy tarts to keep my company...

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-qlzo2ihLkRg/TuAPTSE-54I/AAAAAAAACDs/ZW39_C-Gyyw/s640/IMG_1733.JPG

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-zgLgZjqIUXY/TuAPT2mfXuI/AAAAAAAACDw/ZAOo-gH5Z80/s640/IMG_1734.JPG


I have one, If this is what you mean.
10" fluted, white glazed inside. unglazed bottom. mine isn't earthen wear (Red Clay) mine is white clay.

I've had mine for about 30 years, not a mark on it, cleans easy makes excellent quiches and tarts.

Pillivuyt made in france.

See here, they have a matching service.
I have a covered terrine dish also same brand and vintage.

http://www.pillivuyt.fr/en-pillivuyt-catalogue-grand-public-liste.php?SCID=19&DEB=16
http://www.pillivuyt.fr/en-pillivuyt-catalogue-grand-public-questions-reponses.php

callsign222
12-08-2011, 09:40 AM
The crack has extended further into the pan just from handling it and putting it down on the counter, so it looks like I am definitely SOL. I'll probably go the Emile Henry way. Chip, the benefits of the Burgundy plates is that they can go through crazy temperature swings with no issues-- not sure if this is a composition of the clay thing or some other marvel of engineering. That, and the size is right. I know that with the unglazed underside it's important to dry it upside down so the moisture can evaporate, but I don't think soaking this particular dish would've made a difference. Regardless, I dropped the mofo onto a hard surface. What a bummer there was some sentimental value tied up in this too. Ooooooh well.

elf
12-08-2011, 09:51 AM
pillivuyt has a flan dish, comes in a million diameters. You might follow that link.

Shang
12-08-2011, 10:45 AM
Slightly off-topic but I've lately added to my collection of copper cookware. Some of the pieces resemble Mauviel, but are priced at about half Mauviel's. It is possible that these are seconds (does Mauviel permit seconds?), or perhaps they are counterfeit--if the latter, I may not want to know since I am happy with the way they work.

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f93/shangboat/Mauviel2-1.jpg

(Mauviel, but not mine.)

Mrleft8
12-08-2011, 11:07 AM
I just gave one away....It was my mother's, and I didn't know what it was for.... I'm not much of a tart kinda guy....

John of Phoenix
12-08-2011, 11:45 AM
This looks pretty close - maybe a little fancier but available in several sizes. (From Meli's link)
http://www.pillivuyt.fr/en-pillivuyt-catalogue-grand-public-produit.php?SCID=19&DEB=40&ID=268


http://www.pillivuyt.fr/images/produits/246/268.jpg

Andrew Craig-Bennett
12-08-2011, 11:52 AM
I have one, If this is what you mean.
10" fluted, white glazed inside. unglazed bottom. mine isn't earthen wear (Red Clay) mine is white clay.

I've had mine for about 30 years, not a mark on it, cleans easy makes excellent quiches and tarts.

Pillivuyt made in france.

See here, they have a matching service.
I have a covered terrine dish also same brand and vintage.

http://www.pillivuyt.fr/en-pillivuyt-catalogue-grand-public-liste.php?SCID=19&DEB=16
http://www.pillivuyt.fr/en-pillivuyt-catalogue-grand-public-questions-reponses.php

I have one just like that. Local kitchen shop. It also has a crack, but has not yet fallen apart.

Anthony Zucker
12-08-2011, 12:05 PM
We have a very similar pan made by Emile Henry, in France, sold by Williams-Sanoma. Bottom unglazed, several exterior colors.

We have a lot of their bakeware and like it. There may be less expensive oulets but Williams-Sanoma is in every mall.

Shang
12-08-2011, 12:13 PM
It is that time of year again--the time when "Saveur" magazine asks if I wish to continue my subscription. Each year I say to myself, No, don't do this, you are vegetarian and Saveur is not. But each year I am seduced by Saveur--they publish pornography for gourmands and we hobby chefs. Even their illustrations are seductive. So each year I re-subscribe.
Also they publish on line: http://www.saveur.com/ I just downloaded their recipe for Karfiolleves (Paprika-Spiced Cauliflower Soup).

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f93/shangboat/7-SAV142-Karfiolleves-400x600-1.jpg

callsign222
12-08-2011, 12:45 PM
This is the one I'm getting from Emile Henry-

http://www.emilehenryusa.com/images/products/036000.jpg

11" across, same dimensions, same clay, same awesome! Hmmm Hmm Bernese Onion Tart and Cheese Tart and Apple Tart and Abricot Tart and Plum Tart and...

katey
12-08-2011, 12:55 PM
But each year I am seduced by Saveur--they publish pornography for gourmands and we hobby chefs. Even their illustrations are seductive.

Much to my parents' consternation, my sister and a mixed-sex group of her college friends rented a house together her sophomore year. It got worse when my parents heard about "the pornography book," which any member of the house might be found perusing on the living room sofa at any hour of the day, emitting groans and drool. Of course "the pornography book" was a particularly well-illustrated chocolate cookbook.

Shang
12-08-2011, 02:01 PM
Much to my parents' consternation, my sister and a mixed-sex group of her college friends rented a house together her sophomore year. It got worse when my parents heard about "the pornography book," which any member of the house might be found perusing on the living room sofa at any hour of the day, emitting groans and drool. Of course "the pornography book" was a particularly well-illustrated chocolate cookbook.

When my kid was in college he and his friends formed a meal-cooking co-op. They bought in bulk, froze large quanties of food, then the girls in the group cooked, and the guys cleaned up. Worked pretty well.

And my kid married the nicest of the girls.

katey
12-08-2011, 02:11 PM
In their household the guys were mostly the chefs. It says something about the group that, after 20 years, even -I- (who didn't attend the same college) know where they all are, and in fact corresponded with one of them this morning.

Garret
12-08-2011, 02:20 PM
I'm not much of a tart kinda guy....

While you never resist an opportunity to give me grief, I'm gonna show off my maturity & resist this wide open invitation ;)

To the OP: Not fluted, but otherwise close: http://fantes.com/bakers.html

CEFeighn
12-08-2011, 02:36 PM
Have you checked on the possibiltiy of having the pan re-fired? The glaze might flow into the crack and save the pan.

John of Phoenix
12-08-2011, 06:34 PM
Bernese Onion Tart and Cheese Tart and Apple Tart and Abricot Tart and Plum Tart and... And as a "Thank you all very much", perhaps you could share those recipies? :)

callsign222
12-09-2011, 09:12 PM
I could...

callsign222
12-09-2011, 09:33 PM
Ok ok

Since the annual Onion Festival was just held in Bern (last Monday of Nov), I've been cooking up some Bernese Onion Tarts to celebrate and bring back the memories. The Onion Festival is a giant festival that involves lots of onions braided together in pretty patterns with dried flowers and the time-honored tradition of communal drinking in the streets.

Very surprisingly, this recipe from Saveur was not only easy, but delicious (http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Swiss-Onion-Tart), and quite close to the tarts I remember. I use slightly different proportions for my pan and my personal taste, such as 2 Whites and 1 Yellow onion, and 6-7oz of Gruyere (spend the money and get the AOC stuff from Switzerland, for crying out loud) instead of the piddling 3oz. I go a little heavy on the bacon and lighter on the salt, but that's just me. Oh and I do my own crust and pre-cook it-- nothing, absolutely nothing, ruins a good tart or quiche like soggy uncooked crust. It should be dry and supporting. I can't stand quiches in America they are always soggy and flacid.

Hmm Hmmmm good. This is why I am attached to my cracked tart pan.

elf
12-09-2011, 11:45 PM
So tell me, I've always wondered.

What does one do with the beans after they've been baked in the crust for so long?

And I agree, 3 oz of gruyere is really stingy!

callsign222
12-10-2011, 09:19 AM
So tell me, I've always wondered.

What does one do with the beans after they've been baked in the crust for so long?

And I agree, 3 oz of gruyere is really stingy!

I don't know. Use them for another crust next time, I guess? We all have our crusty ways. That way is intriguing but not worth it for me.

Stiletto
12-10-2011, 04:23 PM
I have looked for a ceramic quiche pan like that, there seems to be quite a few available online.

Nicholas Carey
12-10-2011, 05:34 PM
This will be quite a niche subject, so apologies but I don't know where else to ask with an audience that has a such a worldly scope:

I have a beloved earthenware tart pan from the Bourgogne region of France that is glazed inside and unglazed along the bottom. It produces some beautiful tarts with perfectly evenly cooked crusts and I love it. It has an 11" or so diameter, a little wider than the standard 9" American pie pan, but not the full 12"/30cm pie pans of Europe-- so I can carefully stretch American 9" refrigerated doughs when I'm feeling lazy and don't want to make my own and have them fit.

I dropped it last week and my wife found a crack down a flute extending into the pan.

My local potter told me I was SOL, be careful with it and hope for the best. I am hunting for a replacement, but I can only find ceramic replacements that are glazed topside and underside, and they are the wrong size.

Anyone know what this is officially called or where I could find some? Google searches are not working. Anyone steeped in French cookware or anyone with local knowledge from Bourgogne (Burgundy) who can point me in the right direction? I'm not going back to Switzerland for at least 6 months if not more, and it's going to be a long winter without my myriad of yummy tarts to keep my company...

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-qlzo2ihLkRg/TuAPTSE-54I/AAAAAAAACDs/ZW39_C-Gyyw/s640/IMG_1733.JPG



En Anglais, that is variously called a flan pan or quiche pan. In French, it's called, depending on its size, shape and the phase of the moon:


Moule à crème brûlée
Moule à feuilletè (rectangular)
Moule à tarte
Tourtière

Mine, that I will never, ever surrender was made by Phillipe Deshoulières (http://www.deshoulieres.com/), who've been making porcelain since 1826 in Limoges. Another brand is Apilco (http://www.apilco.com/), which is actually part of Groupe Deshoulières.

Emile Henry (http://www.emilehenry.com/efr/fr) is an old-school Burgundian maker. They've been going since 1850 or so.

http://www.emilehenry.com/var/miniatures/c7189cdea3a11c16ab10328f42e1fc56-371x199-4dcd343dbaac4a76a19f799425061692.jpg (http://www.emilehenry.com/var/produits/moyenne/HD336000_tourtiere30.jpg)

Pillivuyt (http://www.pillivuyt.fr) is another fine maker from the Sologne. They've been at it since 1818. They make 11 different sizes (http://www.pillivuyt.fr/en-pillivuyt-catalogue-grand-public-produit.php?SCID=19&DEB=40&ID=268), ranging from the No. 1 at 115mm/4-1/2 inches to the No. 11 at 33 cm/13 inches.

To get one, you could do a whole lot worse than to ring E. Dehellerin (http://www.e-dehillerin.fr/index.php) in Paris on +33 1 42 36 53 13 (or email them at mailto:info@e-dehillerin.fr (info@e-dehillerin.fr)). Great service, great prices and the most amazing assortment of kitchenwares in the universe (carbon steel knives, anyone?). Hours (Paris time) are Mondays 9-6, but closed from 12-2 for lunch, and Tuesday-Saturday 9-6. Fermé le dimanche as they say.

As far as availability in the USofA, Sur la Table (http://www.surlatable.com/) carries the 11-1/2 inch Emile Henry model (http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-236836/Emile-Henry-White-Quiche-and-Tart-Dish-).

Williams-Sonoma (http://www.williams-sonoma.com/) carries the Apilco model at 9-3/4 inches (http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/apilco-porcelain-quiche-dish/?pkey=e%7Capilco%7C79%7Cbest%7C0%7Cviewall%7C24%7C %7C19).

callsign222
01-05-2012, 09:21 AM
Ok, so I threw down and got the quiche dish from Emile Henry. (http://www.emilehenryusa.com/Quiche.html?parentId=410&pushParent) It is unglazed underneath. It is white, where my old was brown. Can color affect browning and cooking of the crust? My mother-in-law says yes, due to heat retention with darker materials, this is why in the '70's people had darker quiche/tart/pie dishes, but Emile Henry should know their stuff, otherwise they wouldn't make all their dishes, white... right?

It is about 1/3 of an inch wider but a little shorter, so there should be no difference, really, and my crusts fit nice. However, I'm getting a strange double kink now on the fluting, where the bottom of the crust stays in the corner but the top of the fluting withdraws and pulls away from the top of the fluting. It's an interesting effect but increases weak points along the crust. I made a nice quiche yesterday, it came out great, save the double kink. Anyone have any ideas?

htom
01-05-2012, 10:16 AM
Guessing, the top is done first and contracting away from the rim. Why ... I don't know. Dark colors absorb heat faster, maybe your old pan was setting all of the crust on the outside faster, this one isn't. Is the kink where the filling stops? (The filling perhaps slowing the setting of the crust.)

Paul Pless
01-05-2012, 11:35 AM
Yeah, this is French cooking we're talking about......surrender to the flavor.ahhhhhh. . .surrender to the butter.

Nicholas Carey
01-05-2012, 11:40 AM
Ok, so I threw down and got the quiche dish from Emile Henry. (http://www.emilehenryusa.com/Quiche.html?parentId=410&pushParent) It is unglazed underneath. It is white, where my old was brown. Can color affect browning and cooking of the crust? My mother-in-law says yes, due to heat retention with darker materials, this is why in the '70's people had darker quiche/tart/pie dishes, but Emile Henry should know their stuff, otherwise they wouldn't make all their dishes, white... right?

It is about 1/3 of an inch wider but a little shorter, so there should be no difference, really, and my crusts fit nice. However, I'm getting a strange double kink now on the fluting, where the bottom of the crust stays in the corner but the top of the fluting withdraws and pulls away from the top of the fluting. It's an interesting effect but increases weak points along the crust. I made a nice quiche yesterday, it came out great, save the double kink. Anyone have any ideas?

Are you prebaking the tart shell? That.s usually require for any tart-like creation that gets filled with a custard, as the liquid custard won't let the shell cook properly. If you are prebaking it, are you pricking the bottom of the shell and filling it with uncooked dry beand or pie weights? Weighting the shell while prebaking helps prevent bubbling and shrinkage.

callsign222
01-05-2012, 06:28 PM
Thanks NC, I am definitely pre-baking the crust and pricking the bottom, with a quick egg yolk glaze painted on at the end. I generally do not weight the shell during pre-bake (personal pref), and the pull back from the fluting is minimal, since I put in a soft curve over the top to "anchor" it in place. The pull back occurs during main baking, and as mentioned by htom, the kink does begin where the filling stops. I haven't had this issue with my older dish. It's really not the end of the world, but this problem is far more fun and tasty to investigate than thinking about real issues.

I'm going to try another quiche tonight and see if I can isolate the problem. I'm going to go for one my wife wanted out of "Joy" that has tomatoes and goat cheese.

htom
01-05-2012, 06:34 PM
Next time, try baking it 25ºF higher when it's filled. Might be done 2-3 minutes sooner. (This would give that ring of crust less time to contract.(

callsign222
01-05-2012, 06:48 PM
Good idea! I will do that tonight and report back.

callsign222
01-05-2012, 07:23 PM
Ok Nicholas, I think you've got a point. I just gently prebaked the crust and it pulled away massively from one side. I'm all ears, guys. What is your method? The easier the better, since I make these often, I don't want to be pulling out individual beans for two hours. Parch. paper? What kind of beans? How do you gauge the "cookedness" of the crust when it's covered in beans?

Nicholas Carey
01-05-2012, 07:52 PM
Ok Nicholas, I think you've got a point. I just gently prebaked the crust and it pulled away massively from one side. I'm all ears, guys. What is your method? The easier the better, since I make these often, I don't want to be pulling out individual beans for two hours. Parch. paper? What kind of beans? How do you gauge the "cookedness" of the crust when it's covered in beans?

I always put a piece of aluminium foil or parchment paper on top of the unbaked crust, then fill that with beans or aluminium pie weights. Beans are cheaper; the aluminium weights last longer.

When the crust is done, lift it all out with the foil or parchment paper and pour the hot weights into a bowl and let them cool 'til you can return them to the container in which they live. Don't forget to let the crust cool.

FWIW, I use the traditional tinned steel tart pans with the removable bottom

http://www.cooking.com/images/products/Enlarge/117669e.jpg

Lay your pastry over the top and work it into the corners. Drape the excess over the edges.

Then you take your rolling pin and run it over the top of the tart pan -- A perfect edge!

callsign222
01-05-2012, 08:44 PM
I have an removable bottom tart pan but I've really been digging the clay recently, though it appears I'm still figuring out my new one.

Tonight's quiche came out nice, I didn't have the kink though I definitely had the crust pull away from the fluting. What kind of beans are you using Nicholas?

I'm going to start on my epiphany cake for tomorrow, who's in? (not religious in the least, but nice memories from being a kid) Hmmmm vanilla sugar and hard inserted hidden items that break your teeth!

Nicholas Carey
01-05-2012, 08:48 PM
What kind of beans are you using Nicholas?

We've got a mason jar of pie weights, plus a couple of mason jars of assorted dried beans, mostly pinto, I believe.

callsign222
01-06-2012, 08:00 PM
So I made my classic leek, gruyere, mushroom, bacon quiche this evening and this time I pre-baked at a lower temperature for a shorter amount of time. This kept retraction to a minimum, and then I had quite a successful bake. No kink, either. Tomorrow will be the real test, when I pull out the chilled remainder of the quiche and see how the crust stands... maybe with this one I have to keep the temps down initially, and then I can climb them when I throw it in with the filling.