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Lew Barrett
12-05-2011, 08:33 PM
It must have been quite a party!

You know what day it is today, right? (http://www.repealday.org/) Yeah...sure...two days before Pearl Harbor!

Discuss the many ramifications of Repeal Day here, or don't.

Drink responsibly. (This is the best the distilleries could come up with to prove they don't want you to get too sloshed).

Shang
12-05-2011, 08:41 PM
"All nations welcome except Carry!"

johnw
12-05-2011, 08:56 PM
It must have been quite a party!

You know what day it is today, right? (http://www.repealday.org/) Yeah...sure...two days before Pearl Harbor!

Discuss the many ramifications of Repeal Day here, or don't.

Drink responsibly. (This is the best the distilleries could come up with to prove they don't want you to get too sloshed).

How good could it be, really? I had no difficulty finding my car the next morning.

Keith Wilson
12-05-2011, 09:15 PM
That's worth celebrating.

One of the most interesting concerts I've ever been to was called Songs of Temperance and Temptation, by the Rose Ensemble, a local early music group, but this time they sang historic pro-and anti-prohibition songs. Brought it much more to life than just reading about it, and the quality of the performance was superb.

Here's the famous photo of Carrie Nation with her hatchet and her bible:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_xslElWhAZBQ/SheIOHz73eI/AAAAAAAAB_0/SZ5Wz9VxhPM/s1600/CarryNation1910.jpg

Shang
12-05-2011, 09:22 PM
"How are you going to wet your whistle,
When the whole damn world's gone dry?
What are you going to do in the morning,
When you need a nip to open up your eye?
Go and see a circus, lemonade you buy,
But you can see more animals if you drink a little rye.
We took this country from the Indians,
they can have it back in July,
How are you going to wet your whistle
when the whole damn world's gone dry..."

(From memory)

David G
12-05-2011, 10:44 PM
That's worth celebrating.

One of the most interesting concerts I've ever been to was called Songs of Temperance and Temptation, by the Rose Ensemble, a local early music group, but this time they sang historic pro-and anti-prohibition songs. Brought it much more to life than just reading about it, and the quality of the performance was superb.

Here's the famous photo of Carrie Nation with her hatchet and her bible:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_xslElWhAZBQ/SheIOHz73eI/AAAAAAAAB_0/SZ5Wz9VxhPM/s1600/CarryNation1910.jpg


Does that foto remind anyone else of George Wallace defending the white-only elementary schools?

BrianW
12-05-2011, 10:59 PM
Does that foto remind anyone else of George Wallace defending the white-only elementary schools?

They both wore a purse?

BrianW
12-05-2011, 11:02 PM
Thanks Lew! A "bilgeworthy thread" indeed!

bobbys
12-05-2011, 11:12 PM
Theres a few in this pic i would give up my Hot Toddy for.

http://mat.ellis.name/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/prohibition.png

Keith Wilson
12-05-2011, 11:23 PM
To be a little more charitable to Ms. Nation, her first husband drank himself to death. (Yeah, yeah, I know, I can hear all you wiseasses now, "If I were married to her, I would too." :d ) But it was when she was much younger and not so grim.

leikec
12-05-2011, 11:32 PM
To be a little more charitable to Ms. Nation, her first husband drank himself to death. (Yeah, yeah, I know, I can hear all you wiseasses now, "If I were married to her, I would too." :d ) But it was when she was much younger and not so grim.


How much less grim?? There's a lot of grim there....:D

Jeff C

Arizona Bay
12-05-2011, 11:39 PM
That's worth celebrating.

One of the most interesting concerts I've ever been to was called Songs of Temperance and Temptation, by the Rose Ensemble, a local early music group, but this time they sang historic pro-and anti-prohibition songs. Brought it much more to life than just reading about it, and the quality of the performance was superb.

Here's the famous photo of Carrie Nation with her hatchet and her bible:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_xslElWhAZBQ/SheIOHz73eI/AAAAAAAAB_0/SZ5Wz9VxhPM/s1600/CarryNation1910.jpg

Remarkable :D

http://newpaltzus.wikispaces.com/file/view/200px-GeorgeCWallace.png/146627677/200px-GeorgeCWallace.png

johnw
12-06-2011, 12:07 AM
What I'd like to know is why our second amendment rights get talked about all the time, and our 21st amendment right seldom get mentioned in public debate. People talk about "second amendment solutions" to our political problems, but certainly more of us resort to 21st amendment solutions.

johnw
12-06-2011, 12:19 AM
You know, repeal day isn't really a good name for the day. After all, many things have been repealed. It should say something positive about the rights we have gained on this day, like Independence day does.

How does Inebriation Day sound?

Lew Barrett
12-06-2011, 12:45 AM
Theres a few in this pic i would give up my Hot Toddy for.

http://mat.ellis.name/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/prohibition.png

A darling bunch! They look like they just got off the Chisholm Trail and it was not a happy ride, either for them or those in their company! (Does not look like a genuine period photo though I admit I would not be too surprised to be proven wrong).

Social engineering is a tough row to hoe. Better to modify behavior than laws, eh?

bobbys
12-06-2011, 12:50 AM
A darling bunch! They look like they just got off the Chisholm Trail and it was not a happy ride, either for them or those in their company! (Does not look like a genuine period photo though).

Social engineering is a tough row to hoe. Better to modify behavior than laws, eh?.

My Mother in law seems to have the same expressions as these ladies when she see's me...

johnw
12-06-2011, 12:55 AM
A darling bunch! They look like they just got off the Chisholm Trail and it was not a happy ride, either for them or those in their company! (Does not look like a genuine period photo though I admit I would not be too surprised to be proven wrong).

Social engineering is a tough row to hoe. Better to modify behavior than laws, eh?

I would have guessed Donner Pass. They certainly look like they ate something that doesn't agree with them.

Funny thing is, alcohol consumption in this country started to fall around 1830. The temperance movement got going, temperance advocates were big on putting in safe drinking water and public drinking fountains -- prohibition didn't affect drinking nearly as much, except that you no longer had to go to a legal drinking establishment to get a drink. Funny thing, the Anti-Saloon League was more influential in getting prohibition passed than the temperance crowd, who were mainly women. The ASL had a lot of cross-membership with the KKK, and they knew they would always be able to get a drink. They wanted to shut down immigrant and Negro bars, figured that's where people got together and talked politics.

Lew Barrett
12-06-2011, 10:36 AM
I would have guessed Donner Pass. They certainly look like they ate something that doesn't agree with them.

Funny thing is, alcohol consumption in this country started to fall around 1830. The temperance movement got going, temperance advocates were big on putting in safe drinking water and public drinking fountains -- prohibition didn't affect drinking nearly as much, except that you no longer had to go to a legal drinking establishment to get a drink. Funny thing, the Anti-Saloon League was more influential in getting prohibition passed than the temperance crowd, who were mainly women. The ASL had a lot of cross-membership with the KKK, and they knew they would always be able to get a drink. They wanted to shut down immigrant and Negro bars, figured that's where people got together and talked politics.

Being the proprietor of a book store has endowed you with the most interesting tidbits and factoids, this among them. Thanks, JW.

George Jung
12-06-2011, 11:04 AM
Theres a few in this pic i would give up my Hot Toddy for.

http://mat.ellis.name/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/prohibition.png

I'd suggest 'poster size' and planted nicely/prominently on that lot someone else had referenced where the hormone-soaked were doing their bidness....

If this doesn't take the starch outta yer undies, I don't know what would!

Cuyahoga Chuck
12-06-2011, 12:57 PM
That's worth celebrating.

One of the most interesting concerts I've ever been to was called Songs of Temperance and Temptation, by the Rose Ensemble, a local early music group, but this time they sang historic pro-and anti-prohibition songs. Brought it much more to life than just reading about it, and the quality of the performance was superb.

Here's the famous photo of Carrie Nation with her hatchet and her bible:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_xslElWhAZBQ/SheIOHz73eI/AAAAAAAAB_0/SZ5Wz9VxhPM/s1600/CarryNation1910.jpg
Thanks for thr opening, Keith.
Carrie Nation and the WCTU were quite unsuccessful in bringing about prohibition. The messiah of Prohibition and inventor of one issue politics was one Wayne Wheeler, an Ohioan. Graduate of Oberlin College (class of 1894) and Western Reserve law Shool in Cleveland. He became the leader of the Anti-Saloon League which was the vehicle that got Prohibition thru the congress and had the necessary ratifications in less than a year.
Wheeler was known for defeating recalcitrant politicians and making common ground with any faction, including the Ku Klux Klan, to push his agenda along. It was said he was the most powerful man in America up to the time of his death in 1927.
The most famous acolyte of Wayne Wheeler seems to be none other than Grover Norquist.
The importance of repeal at the time was that it instantly produced about 500,000 jobs just for the supply and manufacture of beer and spirits. Not a bad coup for MR. Roosevelt. And no need to raid public coffers.

bobbys
12-06-2011, 01:04 PM
Thanks for thr opening, Keith.
Carrie Nation and the WCTU were quite unsuccessful in bringing about prohibition. The messiah of Prohibition and inventor of one issue politics was one Wayne Wheeler, an Ohioan. Graduate of Oberlin College (class of 1894) and Western Reserve law Shool in Cleveland. He became the leader of the Anti-Saloon League which was the vehicle that got Prohibition thru the congress and had the necessary ratifications in less than a year.
Wheeler was known for defeating recalcitrant politicians and making common ground with any faction, including the Ku Klux Klan, to push his agenda along. It was said he was the most powerful man in America up to the time of his death in 1927.
The most famous acolyte of Wayne Wheeler seems to be none other than Grover Norquist..

And in post 20 CC lands the lib money shot to link a present day Conservative.

George Jung
12-06-2011, 01:13 PM
I tink that's called 'Professional Grade'.

John Bell
12-06-2011, 01:42 PM
Now that Gallup is trending 50% for cannabis legalization, how long before another repeal day? Discuss.

johnw
12-06-2011, 03:25 PM
Being the proprietor of a book store has endowed you with the most interesting tidbits and factoids, this among them. Thanks, JW.

There's a pretty good book on it called America Walks Into a Bar. I don't have a copy, but you should, if only for the title.

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/The-Spirited-History-of-the-American-Bar.html

From the interview:

Is happy hour a cornerstone of democracy? Yes, because chatting over a beer has often led to dramatic change, says Christine Sismondo, humanities lecturer at Toronto’s York University. Her new book, America Walks into a Bar, contends that local dives deserve more credit in history than they receive; they are where conversations get started. Smithsonian.com contributor Rebecca Dalzell spoke with Sismondo about her book.

How did you get interested in bars?
I used to travel around America a lot, and wherever I went it seemed that bars were important historic markers. On the Freedom Trail in Boston they talk about the Green Dragon Tavern, and in New York, George Washington said farewell to his troops at Fraunces Tavern. The American Revolution, Whisky Rebellion and Stonewall riots all came out of bars. Plus, I’ve worked in a neighborhood bar, so its function as a community center became clear to me.
What makes bars unique in American culture?
Taverns produced a particular type of public sphere in colonial America. Without them I don’t think you would have had exactly the same political landscape. Many people compare it to the coffeehouse in London or Paris salons, but those were bourgeois meeting-places. In taverns people could mix together: you see men drinking alongside the people they work for. Early laws fixed the price that tavern-keepers could charge for a drink, so they couldn’t cater to wealthy patrons. And once you add alcohol in there, it changes the way everyone relates to each other. You end up with accelerated relationships—and occasionally cantankerous ones. People become more willing to go out and raise hell over things that they might have let go when sober.
Are there any constants that run through our bar history?
Bars have always been where people share news and discuss it. And there’s an unwritten code in most neighborhood bars that people are supposed to check their degrees at the door. You can find a lawyer, university professor, taxi driver and dishwasher all talking about politics, and nobody’s supposed to pull rank.


Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/The-Spirited-History-of-the-American-Bar.html#ixzz1fmvdkB4O