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seanz
12-05-2011, 05:11 AM
I've created a monster.

In the never-ending quest for weed domination I have developed a new garden tool. It is the head of a rabbiter's mattock fitted to a 36" maul handle, Link Handles of Arkansas, no less.
The mattock head is quite light and about 4" across the "cut" and made of good forged steel so it can be made very sharp, so cut it does.

Weeds fear me.

I also wear steel-capped gum-boots.......because I don't want to end up in the infirmary.

On a completely unrelated note, the emergency services number in NZ is 111.

PeterSibley
12-05-2011, 05:14 AM
:d:d:d

The Bigfella
12-05-2011, 05:18 AM
When did they change from 999

stevebaby
12-05-2011, 06:08 AM
Get the waterstones out.

Paul Pless
12-05-2011, 07:16 AM
In the never-ending quest for weed domination Is your condition chronic?

Stiletto
12-05-2011, 03:48 PM
When did they change from 999

I am 62 and cant recall it ever being 999, (but that might just be my memory's fault).

seanz
12-05-2011, 04:19 PM
Is your condition chronic?

Worse, it's disastrous. I'm probably about 6 months behind with the weeding......before I made this new tool I thought I might have to start negotiating with the more invasive species.

Mcjim
12-05-2011, 04:22 PM
When did they change from 999

NZ has always been 111 - historical quirk. Our old dial phones were numbered clockwise from 0 to 9.

Nicholas Carey
12-05-2011, 04:24 PM
I used to drive a Japanese "Farmer's Hoe" something like these:

http://www.fine-tools.com/hacke313137.jpg http://www.environmentalgreenproducts.com/store/images/T/farmer_hoe_3.jpg

Forged, laminated Japanese tool steel. "Knife through hot butter" is the phrase that comes to mind.

http://www.environmentalgreenproducts.com/store/kusakichi-brand-farmer-hoe-c-295-p-1-pr-16311.html

http://www.fine-tools.com/gartenjj.htm

But years ago, when Smith & Hawkin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smith_%26_Hawken) was a crazy bunch of Marin County hippies hawking high-end gardening tools by mail order from a single stored in Mill Valley, I was in Marin County and got turned one to Eliot Coleman's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eliot_Coleman) "collinear hoe". Much better than just about anything else I've ever tried:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_IlzmgAF60 http://www.leevalley.com/us/images/item/gardening/pd131s4.jpg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_IlzmgAF60

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/c-568-collinear-hoes.aspx?source=google_tools_supplies&9gtype=search&9gkw=collinear hoe&9gad=7093965493.1&gclid=CKvl6vzv66wCFQhbhwodR3hcMg

http://www.leevalley.com/us/garden/page.aspx?p=10422&cat=2,44823&ap=1

switters
12-05-2011, 04:33 PM
so I'm thinking "wtf is a rabbiters mattock?" So I look it up on google, and like so many things the Australians say in this place I was directed back to this thread.

I'm pretty sure you make up words just to mess with us.

seanz
12-05-2011, 04:35 PM
I'm pretty sure you make up words just to mess with us.


:D:D:D

Perish the thought.......

Nicholas Carey
12-05-2011, 04:43 PM
so I'm thinking "wtf is a rabbiters mattock?" So I look it up on google, and like so many things the Australians say in this place I was directed back to this thread.

I'm pretty sure you make up words just to mess with us.

Here you go. From NZ, c. WWI. Note, in the photo below, the "rabbiter's mattock" used to crack open the den:

http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4085/4836054716_381817265f_o.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationallibrarynz_commons/4836054716/)
A rabbiter setting a trap at Lustleigh, World War I, [ca 1918] (http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationallibrarynz_commons/4836054716/) by National Library NZ on The Commons (http://www.flickr.com/people/nationallibrarynz_commons/), on Flickr

See also, the Rabbiter's Forum at http://www.rabbiters.co.uk/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl

:D

seanz
12-05-2011, 04:48 PM
There's a Rabbiters forum? Teh internets has everything........

I'll have a go at posting a picture later, but I've still not impressed by Photobucket's new legaleze agreement, so we'll see.

switters
12-05-2011, 04:53 PM
I suppose as someone with a post or two on the wooden boat forum that the "rabbiters" forum shouldn't have surprised me.

But it did.

Meanwhile, in my younger days, I did put one of these together. Didn't last long after I caught the leather boots just enough to rethink the safety of it all while I could still walk on both naturally grown feet.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=aQRed-j_lYI

seanz
12-05-2011, 05:03 PM
Ha, I had a brush-cutter that had a saw-blade as a standard attachment.

Mrleft8
12-05-2011, 06:16 PM
I used to drive a Japanese "Farmer's Hoe" something like these:

http://www.fine-tools.com/hacke313137.jpg http://www.environmentalgreenproducts.com/store/images/T/farmer_hoe_3.jpg

Forged, laminated Japanese tool steel. "Knife through hot butter" is the phrase that comes to mind.

http://www.environmentalgreenproducts.com/store/kusakichi-brand-farmer-hoe-c-295-p-1-pr-16311.html

http://www.fine-tools.com/gartenjj.htm

But years ago, when Smith & Hawkin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smith_%26_Hawken) was a crazy bunch of Marin County hippies hawking high-end gardening tools by mail order from a single stored in Mill Valley, I was in Marin County and got turned one to Eliot Coleman's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eliot_Coleman) "collinear hoe". Much better than just about anything else I've ever tried:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_IlzmgAF60 http://www.leevalley.com/us/images/item/gardening/pd131s4.jpg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_IlzmgAF60

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/c-568-collinear-hoes.aspx?source=google_tools_supplies&9gtype=search&9gkw=collinear hoe&9gad=7093965493.1&gclid=CKvl6vzv66wCFQhbhwodR3hcMg

http://www.leevalley.com/us/garden/page.aspx?p=10422&cat=2,44823&ap=1My yard laughs at tools like those. We need to use a pick ax to plant a daffodil bulb. The rocks eat garden tillers for breakfast. The fancy S&H hoes?..... They become whimpering bits of twisted metal and splintered wood in minutes.

Nicholas Carey
12-05-2011, 06:45 PM
My yard laughs at tools like those. We need to use a pick ax to plant a daffodil bulb. The rocks eat garden tillers for breakfast. The fancy S&H hoes?..... They become whimpering bits of twisted metal and splintered wood in minutes.Well...there is a built-in assumption that you've prepped your garden beds properly.

For eradication dandelions, though, there is only one solution (excluding the use of Agent Orange :D): Grampaw's Weeder (http://www.grampasgardenware.com/weeder/weeder.html). Made in Lake Oswego, Oregon for the last century or so. Well...used to be. They appear to make it in China in these latter days. Mine's still US-made.

Buy it from Ace Hardware, etc.

http://www.leevalley.com/en/garden/page.aspx?cat=2,2300,44822&p=54671

1. Acquire target and center on the crown

http://www.leevalley.com/en/images/item/Gardening/pt705s3.jpg

2. Tromp on the footpad to spear spear it:

http://www.leevalley.com/en/images/item/Gardening/pt705v5.jpg

3. Tilt the handle back towards the footpad and Bobs-yer-uncle:

http://www.leevalley.com/en/images/item/Gardening/pt705v4.jpg

Works pretty much that well. Better than anything else I've tried.

Mrleft8
12-05-2011, 07:04 PM
LOL! The very idea of poking something into the ground by simply stepping on it is amusing. :D
I'm not kidding. If you throw a shovel in the air so it lands pointy side down in this yard you hear a "Doink!" sound and the shovel falls over flat.
I had to import soil to back fill the holes when I planted Apple trees 18 years ago. The trees grew great for 2 years, and have remained the same size since then. The roots can't get beyond the original hole boundaries.
And it's not for lack of trying.... I pull up dozens of bowling ball sized rocks every year. And every year, more pop up...

bobbys
12-05-2011, 07:14 PM
Well...there is a built-in assumption that you've prepped your garden beds properly.

For eradication dandelions, though, there is only one solution (excluding the use of Agent Orange :D): Grampaw's Weeder (http://www.grampasgardenware.com/weeder/weeder.html). Made in Lake Oswego, Oregon for the last century or so. Well...used to be. They appear to make it in China in these latter days. Mine's still US-made.

Buy it from Ace Hardware, etc.

http://www.leevalley.com/en/garden/page.aspx?cat=2,2300,44822&p=54671

1. Acquire target and center on the crown

http://www.leevalley.com/en/images/item/Gardening/pt705s3.jpg

2. Tromp on the footpad to spear spear it:

http://www.leevalley.com/en/images/item/Gardening/pt705v5.jpg

3. Tilt the handle back towards the footpad and Bobs-yer-uncle:

http://www.leevalley.com/en/images/item/Gardening/pt705v4.jpg

Works pretty much that well. Better than anything else I've tried..

I have one, Works great all the neighbors went out and bought one after using mine

Nicholas Carey
12-05-2011, 07:34 PM
I have one, Works great all the neighbors went out and bought one after using mine

The Pacific Northwest, so I am told never had dandelions. At least...not until 1853.

I blame it all on the dopes from East Machias, Maine, who, in 1853 formed what is now Pope & Talbot (http://www.poptal.com/), the Puget Mill Company and founded Port Gamble. "Founded" might be too strong a word: the local S'Klallam had been living there for rather a long time. They liked the location: the S'Klallam name for the place is Teekalet, "brightness of the noonday sun." The S'Klallam liked the light there (It's also a nice protected inlet right at the entrance to the Hood Canal, but never mind). So the Mainers had to evict the existing village so they could found their own village :D But I digress.

Anyway,when the guys brought theirs families to Port Gamble from Maine, so the story goes, one of the wives brought some dandelion seeds with her to Port Gamble, so she could enjoy the flowers of home in the godforsaken wilderness.

Or something :D

We've been trying to get rid of the evil yellow things ever since.

Gerarddm
12-05-2011, 07:41 PM
I loathe 'em. Every year I take evil delight in getting down on my hands and knees and ripping them out by their lungs with a hand fork-tined thingamajig. The buggers can't grow faster than I can rip them out. As my father used to note, the key is to get 'em before they go to seed. When I owned my own my home I had the best looking lawn in the neighborhood ( also cut my grass at the highest setting too, which helped ).

PeterSibley
12-05-2011, 07:44 PM
I used to drive a Japanese "Farmer's Hoe" something like these:

http://www.fine-tools.com/hacke313137.jpg http://www.environmentalgreenproducts.com/store/images/T/farmer_hoe_3.jpg

Forged, laminated Japanese tool steel. "Knife through hot butter" is the phrase that comes to mind.

http://www.environmentalgreenproducts.com/store/kusakichi-brand-farmer-hoe-c-295-p-1-pr-16311.html

http://www.fine-tools.com/gartenjj.htm

But years ago, when Smith & Hawkin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smith_%26_Hawken) was a crazy bunch of Marin County hippies hawking high-end gardening tools by mail order from a single stored in Mill Valley, I was in Marin County and got turned one to Eliot Coleman's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eliot_Coleman) "collinear hoe". Much better than just about anything else I've ever tried:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_IlzmgAF60 http://www.leevalley.com/us/images/item/gardening/pd131s4.jpg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_IlzmgAF60

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/c-568-collinear-hoes.aspx?source=google_tools_supplies&9gtype=search&9gkw=collinear hoe&9gad=7093965493.1&gclid=CKvl6vzv66wCFQhbhwodR3hcMg

http://www.leevalley.com/us/garden/page.aspx?p=10422&cat=2,44823&ap=1

We call the Japanese thing a chip hoe and I've worn out two .

i thought Elliot Coleman was supposed to be Mr Efficiency .A wheel hoe is the tool for those long beds .I built one from pipe and bike wheel and a bit of 2''x1/8'' steel strap .Best tool I ever built .It weeded a 16'' strip at walking pace.

The Bigfella
12-05-2011, 08:07 PM
NZ has always been 111 - historical quirk. Our old dial phones were numbered clockwise from 0 to 9.

Ahh.... that was it. I knew it was the long wait for the dial to return.