PDA

View Full Version : Building Gilpatrick's Puddle Duck canoe



gstanfield
11-25-2011, 07:11 PM
Well, the move from Wyoming to Georgia has been postponed until spring/summer and so I told the Minister of Finance that I must build a boat or I won't live through another Wyoming winter. She's all for it so I browsed through my filing cabinet where 65 various boat plans live (yes, I'm addicted to buying plans to dream of building...) I decided on a strip canoe as they are cheap to build, useful, good looking, don't take up much space and I can sell them for a profit if I get tired of it.:d

I like to fish the river here (North Platte) and find that for one or two guys a smaller canoe works out great. I decided on the little Puddle Duck from Gil Gilpatrick's book Building a Strip Canoe (2nd edition) The day before Thanksgiving I set about tracing the lines onto some paper my wife picked up while in town. I'm keeping track of every minute spent and every penny invested in this build and will update as often as I can on here as well as my facebook page.

Starting off with a good book helps:
http://a2.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/320779_1646271654492_1767938069_839683_1746500046_ n.jpg

I had my wife pick up some children's drawing paper to make the patterns from:
http://a5.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/310631_1643363461789_1767938069_838551_1576112425_ n.jpg

The first step is getting the lines from the half patterns onto something useable. You could trace them onto the wood using transfer paper, but I prefer to make disposable patterns that I can glue direct to the wood and cut along the lines on the paper. It's worked for me in the past so that's how I'm doing it this time too. I decided the front window would be a good place for this action to take place so I taped the supplied half patterns to the window.

http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/383653_1643363981802_1767938069_838554_1215100040_ n.jpg

Being careful to trace the proper set of lines I taped a sheet of paper up and traced them one frame at a time until I had all of the halfs. At this point it looked like this:

http://a1.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/393684_1643363781797_1767938069_838553_1059422416_ n.jpg

Now, about the other half of those frames??? I decided the best way would be to take down the supplied pattern, flip it over and trace them again. This gives me the mirror image and worked out pretty good. I then took my half drawings and taped them together making a full set of full size frame patterns, one for each size frame. Note that this canoe is symmetrical front to back so frames one two and three are also the same as frames five six and seven. There's only need for one set of each though. The best way is to stack two pieces of plywood when cutting and cut both frames of each size at the same time. The same goes for the stems. Here's what the finished frame patterns look like:
http://a1.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/309886_1643364701820_1767938069_838558_1254176127_ n.jpg

Well, that's where I stopped the first day of 11-23-2011.

Total investement at this point was $5.76 and 1.5 hours. The book with the plans was a gift so I don't have to count it in the total!

gstanfield
11-25-2011, 07:23 PM
OK, that brings us to today. I missed a couple of shots while my camera batteries were charging (Note to self, turn off camera after use)

I had to drive into town and pick up some supplies. I picked up enough lumber to build the frames themselves along with the strongback and support bars. I already have some sawhorses to sit the strongback on so that'll work for now. I decided that instead of a ladder (as in the book) I would build my strongback as a box. It has 2x6 sides with an 18inch section in the middle to brace the joint between my 8ft boards. I then capped it with 1/2" plywood, put a few cross braces underneath and screwed it together real good. It's solid, heavy, but moveable and should work just fine.
http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/392202_1651195857594_1767938069_841111_680735603_n .jpg

I could have easily gotten away with a 12ft strongback, but it really didn't cost any more to build a 16ft one and now I have a shelf on one end for planes, glue, stapler, tapemeasure, and plenty of other things I will loose in plain sight during this build. Plus, if I decide to build a larger canoe I'll already have the strongback! Next up was striking a line down the center. It would not be wise to measure for center as I go due to variations in the strongback itself. I got it set in place and used a chalk box to make a line from the center of one end to the center of the other end. Whatever wiggle the strongback has in it doesn't matter now as it has a straight line from end to end!

http://a5.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/320818_1651196017598_1767938069_841112_353899752_n .jpg

Now it is time to mark off the lines for placing the frame supports. I drew lines square with my centerline spacing them every 20 inches as per the directions provided in the book and on the plans. I would have made the frames today, but I forgot to pick up a can of spray glue (town is about 40 miles away) so this is as far as I made it today:

http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/375838_1651196177602_1767938069_841113_858364399_n .jpg

Total investment for today's work was 4 hours (including 1.5 hours of driving and .5 hour shopping) and $107.40

Total to date 5.5 hours and $113.16

Thanks for stopping by :)

gstanfield
11-29-2011, 12:05 PM
Progress report for this morning. I was in town already so I grabbed a can of Super 77 adhesive and I'm back at work. The first step was to cut my plywood in half so that I could double it up and cut two frames at a time.
http://a6.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/311445_1663294920063_1767938069_845802_702928864_n .jpg
After cutting the sheet in half I clamped it together with the edges lined up. Now I can line up my straight side with the edges, cut one time and have two matching frames. I glued the sheets of paper to the plywood with 3M super 77 spray adhesive. I'll just go through and cut through the paper, works great (or has in the past anyway)

http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/313028_1663295160069_1767938069_845803_1722030567_ n.jpg

Frame four still needs cut, but it's a simgle so it will be cut out seperately. The extra space on the sheet is just enough to recut the stems seeing as how they are doubled front and back so I need four of them. Maybe I should have drawn two stem patterns, but this will work out just fine. I'm off to dig out our Christmas stuff from the barn, after lunch I'll be back to work on the canoe and get these frames cut out and screwed in place on the strongback hopefully. I'll post my progress tonight after I reach my stopping point for the day.

Morning investment, $12.17 and 15 minutes for a can of Super 77 and half an hour glueing patterns and cutting plywood in half.
Total investment $125.33 and 6.25 hours

George

gstanfield
11-29-2011, 06:59 PM
Well, back in the shop and hard at work. I now have all of them frames cut out as well as the stems. My prefered method for getting things straight is to set the first and last frames and pull a string between them and set all of the other frames off of that center line.
http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/392629_1664060059191_1767938069_846157_855507397_n .jpg

From there I set all of the frames in place, clamped plumb and centered and screwed to the cross pieces. Next up is shaping the stems. They need to taper so that the strips can come together smoothly. The first one I took about 5 minutes or more to shape with a grinder. It turned out OK, but I know there's a better way...
http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/390261_1664059379174_1767938069_846155_1401801133_ n.jpg

Of course there's an easier way. I remembered my really nice power planer sitting on the shelf and thought it was time to give it a workout. I screwed the stems to the end of the strongback and it took all of about 45 seconds to shape it plus it came out better than the other one. After this screw and glue the two halves together and do any touchup work to make them match.

http://a8.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/386580_1664060339198_1767938069_846158_776276894_n .jpg

Well at the end of the day I have all of the frames in place as well as the bow stem. I still have to do the other stem, but it's time to play hide and seek with the kids and roll the baby around on the floor a bit :)
http://a1.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/376988_1664061259221_1767938069_846161_1133929553_ n.jpg

Total investment at this point: $125.33 and 9.75 hours

Thanks for looking,
GEorge

David G
11-29-2011, 08:22 PM
Looks like fun. I like your presentation format with a summary of hours and dollars at the end of each segment. Looking forward to seeing your progress!

gstanfield
11-29-2011, 08:31 PM
Thanks David, I'm happy to share.

L.W. Baxter
11-29-2011, 08:58 PM
I've built a pair of Gilpatrick's canoes, the 18'6" E.M. White models. Very pretty and handy trippers.

The puddle duck looks like fun.

gstanfield
11-30-2011, 07:42 PM
Well, not much progress today due to a division meeting that lasted half the day:rolleyes:

I did make the trip into town and buy all of my cedar, screws, a new sureform and some staples though. Including the 1+ hour drive time to town and back my daily investment was $105.77 and 3.0 hours for a total to date of $231.10 and 12.75 hours.

Tomorrow I cut cedar boards into little strips and build a simple router table to cut the bead and cove on those strips. I will say that I'm not terribly thrilled about the wood I selected, but I spent two hours digging through what they had just to find enough boards to get started. I needed 12 boards, but only found 7 that were of decent quality. They are gettting in a new shipment next week so I'll drive back into town and dig through it to find some more boards. I would really like to have bought all of the boards at the same time, but I don't want to delay the project so I'll just deal with whatever hassles that come from having mixed lumber...Stay tuned.

George

gstanfield
12-01-2011, 07:38 PM
No new pictures for today, but I did get the other stem shaped and put in place. I also got the edges taped on all the frames and ripped one board into a bunch of little strips. I'll be ripping the other baords tomorrow, but I wanted to try out one today just to have a few strips to play with. I gave up when I had trouble seeing my tablesaw blade due to my glasses foggin up. It's 5 degrees (F) outside and only 30 in the shop. I gotta get that wood heater installed in my shop before winter is over...

Add a couple of hours today for a total of 14.75 hours and $231.10 invested so far.

gstanfield
12-02-2011, 05:53 PM
Got all of the boads ripped into strips, time for some cleaning and setting up the router table for making the bead and cove cuts on the strips. Add 1.5 hours for today's work.
http://a2.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/379815_1672097780129_1767938069_848560_747656266_n .jpg

Total so far 16.25 hours and $231.10

gstanfield
12-09-2011, 07:28 PM
Back at it for a half hour today. This week has been cold, very cold (- 15 Fahrenheit one morning) and so I've stayed inside working on my X-box skills and perfecting the art of drinking !

In order to cut the bead and cove on my strips I need a router table. I have a router, but have not needed a table and won't need one bad enough to spend money I don't have so I'm going to see if I can build one for free, or close to it.

OK, I have a pretty good router. It's a 2HP fixed base model with soft start and a work light built in. It also has the plumbing for dust collection, although I don't have a dust collector as you can tell by looking at my floor!
http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/383612_1691170096925_1767938069_856253_564400109_n .jpg

I'm determined to build this router table for as close to free as possible, I only need it to cut the bead and cove into those strips for my canoe. I found a piece of 1/2" a foot wide and eight feet long. I decided rather arbitrarily that a 36" long table would be a good size for my needs.http://a6.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/385007_1691170296930_1767938069_856254_1678518534_ n.jpg

Box in three sides of the router table. The open side will be the back. It can't be boxed in or I would not be able to get to the collect on the router to tighten the bits in place. It will have a board on the top side across the back that serves as the guide as well as the stiffener for that side so it will be more than stiff enough!
http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/388525_1691170496935_1767938069_856255_1074662406_ n.jpg


Now it's time to make some holes in the table, first I take the plastic off the base of the router.http://a2.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/380442_1691170576937_1767938069_856256_1630830925_ n.jpg

Next I position the plastic base where I want the router to go and use it as a template for cutting my holes.
http://a8.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/380873_1691170776942_1767938069_856257_1784358497_ n.jpg
For now I drilled the center hole and the three mounting holes. I'll probably go back and add the other three holes after I get some longer 10-32 machine screws.

http://a1.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/385501_1691171336956_1767938069_856259_534220740_n .jpg

That's all the progress for now. I need some longer 10-32 screws to mount it in place and then make my guard and decide what to do for legs. I'm going to dig around and see if I can find anything that uses 10-32 machine screws so I can steal them. It's not worth making the drive into town just for some screws. I'd burn more in gas than the screws cost, not to mention it's over an hour round trip just in driving time.

So for today I spent nothing and only used a half hour of my time.

Total to date: 16.75 hours and $231.10 invested

gstanfield
12-09-2011, 09:08 PM
I dug around in my electrical toolbox and found some 10-32 machine screws with flat and lock washers built in. I was wanting some with counter sink heads, but these will work. Since I have to counter sink the screws I decided to go ahead and run all six mounting screws. I drilled the other three holes and overdrilled for some counter sink on the front ones. The ones in the back don't need to be counter sunk as they won't interfer with anything.

http://a1.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/387572_1691400422683_1767938069_856395_1962559276_ n.jpg

A quick flip reveals that the height adjustment is still easily reachable and will let me fine tune the cutting easily from the front side of the table.

http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/382572_1691400622688_113486372_n.jpg
I still have to make some guards, but I'm liking it already. I'll probably slap some bondo on the top and sand it smooth while I'm at it just to make a better surface seeing as how my wood splintered a bit, but I'll see how it works after I get my guard made.

Screws were in my toolbox so no extra cost and only 15 minutes to finish drilling and test fitting and digging for screws. Total is now 17.0 hours and $231.10

Lewisboater
12-10-2011, 09:09 AM
I like the build but I am really interested in the router table. I am sort of in the same boat... I want to have a simple router table to do a birdsmouth but am too cheap (currently) to buy a decent table. Looking forward to seeing how yours turns out.

gstanfield
12-10-2011, 12:04 PM
Thanks Steve. I'll have an update on the table this afternoon. I've decided to finish it and do some test cuts and make sure it works as planned. If it works good then I'll probably smooth it over with some quickfair and then a nice thick epoxy coating for a smoother table surface.

gstanfield
12-10-2011, 08:20 PM
OK, I'll give the spoiler first; the TABLE WORKS!

Now, about the building of it. I managed to scrounge up enough leftover material to build it for free. If I had bought the materials it still would have been built for about $20 or less so I'm calling it a complete success. The next step from where we left off was to clearance the guard so that there is room for the bit itself as well as the screws holding the router and enough clearance to allow the guard to be adjustable. Just some creative cutting with the table saw, my jig saw and a chisel and we have this:
http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/387487_1694571421956_1767938069_857842_510652434_n .jpg

Then flip it over, test fit it and make sure it has plenty of room for adjustments. It did:
http://a5.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/381686_1694571541959_1767938069_857843_1668683615_ n.jpg

I added some legs on it. I still need to put my feet on the legs, but I'll add that later. For now it is solid and workable. The table height will be approximately 34" with the feet in place. Here she is all ready for a test run:
http://a8.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/385406_1694571621961_1767938069_857844_1295489398_ n.jpg

Adjustments are done with C clamps at this time. They are cheap, effective and easily adjustable. I would however recommend using more than just two, this is just the trial run at this point:
http://a2.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/390350_1694571781965_1767938069_857845_358226927_n .jpg

And the money shot that we're all waiting for...she has made sawdust!
http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/393273_1694571941969_1767938069_857846_368203581_n .jpg

The table is not complete yet, but I have proven to myself that I can build a free table that will get the job done. Now I have to put another cross brace from side to side, a small shelf to store bits, a hook for my wrench and the feet. I'll work on all that on my next days off, but I gotta work for the next three days. Stay tuned Wed for the complete table and maybe some operational shots and video of it in action. I'll also be detailing the easy way to build some feather boards instead of buying them.

Total for today: 1.5 hours

Total to date: $231.10 and 18.5 hours.

Thanks

Lewisboater
12-11-2011, 09:52 AM
Thanks...I think one of your pictures went wayward but I get the idea from the last one about the clearance hole for the bit.

gstanfield
12-11-2011, 10:14 AM
You're welcome. Maybe refresh your screen, it shows from my home computer and my work computer so I'd think it should show on yours too :)

Let me know if there is anything I can help with or any angle you want to see a pic from. I'd be happy to help out :)

Lewisboater
12-11-2011, 04:36 PM
Peculiar... I click the topic link in the forum and the pic isn't there...refresh and it is. Haven't run across that before!

gstanfield
12-11-2011, 06:06 PM
maybe it's because all of mine are remote hosted and they are so many and so large? Or maybe it's just peculiar because I am :)

gstanfield
01-07-2012, 06:26 PM
OK, a little more progress. I took the last few weeks off to finish a Christmas present (floor lamp built like a coopered style mast) and spend time with the family and now I'm back at work on the canoe. I spent 1.25 hours the last two days and cut the bead and cove on all of the strips. There's not much to look at, but they interlock very well:

http://a6.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/386273_1773353991471_1767938069_895867_1964862952_ n.jpg

Total so far 21.25 hours and $231.10 invested

gstanfield
01-12-2012, 06:13 PM
Not much progress today due to the temp being too cold to really glue any strips. I did get the sheer strips in place and then glued the first strip to the sheer. I decided that I should wait for a warmer day as the temp in my shop is only 20(F) / -7(C) and titebond III is only supposed to be used down to 47F. I don't want to risk my entire boat trying to glue in the cold. Damn Wyoming winter is killing me :(

http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/374262_1787833753456_1767938069_900920_2014265391_ n.jpg

http://a6.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/374630_1787834073464_1767938069_900921_1074316968_ n.jpg

Total time today was about an hour for a total to date of 22.25 hours and $231.10

Tim Marchetti
01-12-2012, 07:01 PM
Nice build George. This will be a good warm up for building your freighter:d

gstanfield
01-12-2012, 07:39 PM
Yes sir it will. :) I've still gotta decide which freighter plans to order which is actually the biggest reason I haven't ordered them yet. I'm thinking about an 18 or 20 footer, something that will go with this 10hp evinrude I have sitting in the corner of my shop...

Thanks for the comment.

mrxireland
01-13-2012, 01:59 PM
Will be keeping an eye on this thread as i have this book and plans here with me. Love the router table you built, migt do something like this myself to save buying a router table. How much do you think itll cost you when finished

gstanfield
01-13-2012, 02:09 PM
So far I have $231.10 in it and I still have to buy fiberglass, epoxy, seats, rubrail lumber and misc hardware so I figure I'll have about $500-$600 in it when everything is finished, maybe a tad more.

Thanks for the interest.

mrxireland
01-13-2012, 02:16 PM
Can you take a few more pics of different angles of the router table so i can get a better look. Did you have any problems trying to fix the router bit into place. Im trying to work out how you done this because of the thickness of the ply and getting the router bit into the excat postion to get the proper cut you need. And while im talking about router bits, what bits is it you use and how much are they.

mrxireland
01-13-2012, 02:22 PM
So far I have $231.10 in it and I still have to buy fiberglass, epoxy, seats, rubrail lumber and misc hardware so I figure I'll have about $500-$600 in it when everything is finished, maybe a tad more.

Thanks for the interest.



Hope it allcomes to plan for you without any much stress. What type of cedar are you using and will you be mixing the coulours up. As for teh price, thats not bad. Im hoping to build a cedar strip row boat in the next few months but still undecided what one i want as most of the plans are over $100. That book you have is a great wee book as it isnt that expensive and you get all the free plans with it instead of paying them crazy prices.

gstanfield
01-13-2012, 05:06 PM
Plans are just part of building to me, I currently have in my files over 70 boat plans ranging from a few that were free (well kinda, they came with the book I paid for) to almost $200 ( some of the larger boats) Compared to the price of the boat the plans are not that bad really, especially when they come with peace of mind that the end product will be useable and safe ;)

As to the table, sure I can take some more pics. Which angles in particular do you want to see, that way I can just go take the pics you want to see!

As to the bits, I am using 1/4" bead and cove bits. You can buy them many places, but here is one source:
http://woodworker.com/14-bead-bit-mssu-921-411.asp
There are others out there, but those are the bits I have. Adjusting them is not hard at all, any decent router has depth adjustment and you just raise or lower it until it is cutting centered with your strip. For adjusting the depth of cut you do that with your fence on the table.

The wood is western red ceedar. Most of what I have is a yellowish color, but some pieces are fire red. I'll be piecing those red strips as a stripe down the side about halfway from the sheer to the waterline.

mrxireland
01-15-2012, 12:36 PM
What is the thickness and measurements of your strips. Im also interested to hear how much cedar lengths you used. Does it come in 12x1/4 inch x 16ft. If not what size where yours and how many will it take for the canoe.

gstanfield
01-15-2012, 12:58 PM
The boards I bought were deck boards called 5/4x6 over here. Basically they are a finished size of 1" x 5-1/2" and 8ft long. I then ripped them in the table saw into 1/4" wide strips for a strip size of 1/4x1 before cutting the bead and coves. Finished size comes out to about 1/4x3/4 per strip (some loss due to the interlocking cuts) I guesstimated that I will need 12 boards, but I only bought 7 due to limited selection of good stock. Now that I'm starting the stripping portion of the build I think I may possibly get by with only the 7 boards. I guess time will tell...

gstanfield
01-19-2012, 06:03 PM
OK, in the last few days I've managed to pull away briefly and lay some more strips. It's true that a boatbuilder cannot have enough clamps. For now here's a quick cellphone pic of my progress. I'll drag out the real camera when I get a little more work done on this thing.

http://a8.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/395861_1809009722842_1767938069_907894_1810742130_ n.jpg

Total at this point 24.75 hours and $231.10 invested.

gstanfield
01-19-2012, 06:11 PM
Also, I thought I'd toss in my idea for clamping the strips without hurting the fragil cove side. I grabbed some pieces of 1/4" all thread rod out of my scrap bin and lay it inside the cove and clamp to it. It works out great!
http://a6.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/393928_1809037643540_1767938069_907897_717419041_n .jpg
http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/395475_1809950306356_1767938069_908858_919800434_n .jpg

mrxireland
01-20-2012, 12:32 PM
The boards I bought were deck boards called 5/4x6 over here. Basically they are a finished size of 1" x 5-1/2" and 8ft long. I then ripped them in the table saw into 1/4" wide strips for a strip size of 1/4x1 before cutting the bead and coves. Finished size comes out to about 1/4x3/4 per strip (some loss due to the interlocking cuts) I guesstimated that I will need 12 boards, but I only bought 7 due to limited selection of good stock. Now that I'm starting the stripping portion of the build I think I may possibly get by with only the 7 boards. I guess time will tell...




Correct me if im wrong but you needed 12 lengths of 6x1inch 8ft boards. How much did you pay for yours and is there different names for cedar because i have noticed different colours in the timber. Ill be looking the lighter shade and some darker wood but dont know what to ask for.

I phoned about and i can get 4x1 T&G boards @ 4m lenghts @ the local builders yard and i can get 16ft 12x4 inch in cedar of a local window maker but dont know what type this is. The guy just said its from america and doesnt know what colour it is. I dont have the machine to cut the 12x4inch but he's told me that he can cut them to any thickness i want. If i do buy these, do i need them planed also.

I am a member of a uk canoe forum and a guy said he got quoted 600-750quid, this seems abit expensive to me and im near sure that ive read that it should only cost about 200-300quid for enough to build a 16ft canoe.




As for your knew pics, looking well. I need to get my hands on some clamps, all i have is 15 2inch g clamps. Its going to kill me paying 5euro for 1 clamp. How many would you suggest i need to buy for my build

gstanfield
01-20-2012, 01:21 PM
Let me try and get all the questions answered here:


Correct me if im wrong but you needed 12 lengths of 6x1inch 8ft boards. How much did you pay for yours and is there different names for cedar because i have noticed different colours in the timber. Ill be looking the lighter shade and some darker wood but dont know what to ask for./QUOTE]

That was my estimated useage. I think I can do it with less though as they seem to be going further than I anticipated. I think I paid about $8 per board and they are "Western Red Cedar" but there are many other wood types that will work out just fine. Even within the same species of wood there can be terrific color variations. Some of my boards are a very light yellow and others are a dark red. I'll be using this to create an accent strips down the side.

[QUOTE]I phoned about and i can get 4x1 T&G boards @ 4m lenghts @ the local builders yard and i can get 16ft 12x4 inch in cedar of a local window maker but dont know what type this is. The guy just said its from america and doesnt know what colour it is. I dont have the machine to cut the 12x4inch but he's told me that he can cut them to any thickness i want. If i do buy these, do i need them planed also.

I wouldn't bother with T&G boards and you'll be needing to cut them into thin strips and the T&G portion will be wasted. It will be cheaper to buy a table saw and rip your own boards than to pay someone to rip them for you. You will have to be very careful and know what you are doing as it is a dangerous piece of equipment if used incorrectly. Without experience I'd suggest that you spend the extra money and buy boards precut for this use. They will all be the correct size and the finished product will look very nice. Every single strip needs to be exactly the same width and height so if that means planing to size that is fine, mine came out fine just ripping them in the table saw, but your results may vary.


I am a member of a uk canoe forum and a guy said he got quoted 600-750quid, this seems abit expensive to me and im near sure that ive read that it should only cost about 200-300quid for enough to build a 16ft canoe.

That does sound very expensive, but I have no clue as to what to expect in another country. I can only base it off the living expenses and wages here in my part of the USA. When you figure the amount of labor involved in making these strips it might not be so bad. Even in the USA they are $.50 per foot when bought premade from a place like CLC Boats. http://www.clcboats.com/shop/products/boat-building-supplies-epoxy-fiberglass-plywood/marine-plywood-cedar-strips/white-cedar-bead-and-cove-strips.html I guess what I'm saying is that it either takes a lot of work and the proper equipment or it takes the money to pay someone to do the work who also has the equipment ;)


I need to get my hands on some clamps, all i have is 15 2inch g clamps. Its going to kill me paying 5euro for 1 clamp. How many would you suggest i need to buy for my build

As many as you can poissibly afford. You can get by with only a few clamps, but it will mean that you have to work in small sections and wait for the glue to dry and then move on to the next. I could be working a lot faster if I had more clamps myself. There are many acceptable ways to do this. Some people get by with very few clamps by using rubber tubes instead of clamps. Some online searches will find you some websites of people using this method. There is a guy building the same canoe that I am building (he is almost finished) and he used bungee cords instead of clamps and his turned out beautiful! http://www.avanthon.com/page/2/

I hope that helps, I think I answered all the questions. I've made some more progress today so I'll be posting up some more pics tonight.

mrxireland
01-20-2012, 02:08 PM
HAve a look at these and tell me if im ordering the right clamps


https://www.toolbox.co.uk/silverline-light-gclamp-2759-69511 10 of these

https://www.toolbox.co.uk/silverline-quick-clamp-150mm-2763-69535 5 of these

https://www.toolbox.co.uk/draper-capacity-soft-grip-2765-68371 4 of these

https://www.toolbox.co.uk/draper-tacker-13951-staple-3155-63545 1 of this

https://www.toolbox.co.uk/draper-hd-staples-13958-1000-3162-63552 1 box of 14mm

https://www.toolbox.co.uk/silverline-633465-hand-plane-2856-60593 1 of this

mrxireland
01-20-2012, 02:25 PM
Let me try and get all the questions answered here:

[QUOTE]Correct me if im wrong but you needed 12 lengths of 6x1inch 8ft boards. How much did you pay for yours and is there different names for cedar because i have noticed different colours in the timber. Ill be looking the lighter shade and some darker wood but dont know what to ask for./QUOTE]

That was my estimated useage. I think I can do it with less though as they seem to be going further than I anticipated. I think I paid about $8 per board and they are "Western Red Cedar" but there are many other wood types that will work out just fine. Even within the same species of wood there can be terrific color variations. Some of my boards are a very light yellow and others are a dark red. I'll be using this to create an accent strips down the side.


Ill be looking the majority of my boat to be in the lighter colour and some strips in the dark red near the top. If i get the 12x4 16ft lenghts , i think itll all be the same colour or can cedar be differnt shades on teh same tree. Ill have to ring the guy tomorrow and see excatly how much he's going to charge me. I dont think he'll charge me that much as hes only putting it through the saw a few times to cut into inch strips. If its not that expensive, ill buy a few of them large lenghths and ill prob get all the colours im looking and any left over i can also build a canoe as my next project as i already have the plans,tools etc.

I wouldn't bother with T&G boards and you'll be needing to cut them into thin strips and the T&G portion will be wasted. It will be cheaper to buy a table saw and rip your own boards than to pay someone to rip them for you. You will have to be very careful and know what you are doing as it is a dangerous piece of equipment if used incorrectly. Without experience I'd suggest that you spend the extra money and buy boards precut for this use. They will all be the correct size and the finished product will look very nice. Every single strip needs to be exactly the same width and height so if that means planing to size that is fine, mine came out fine just ripping them in the table saw, but your results may vary.



That does sound very expensive, but I have no clue as to what to expect in another country. I can only base it off the living expenses and wages here in my part of the USA. When you figure the amount of labor involved in making these strips it might not be so bad. Even in the USA they are $.50 per foot when bought premade from a place like CLC Boats. http://www.clcboats.com/shop/products/boat-building-supplies-epoxy-fiberglass-plywood/marine-plywood-cedar-strips/white-cedar-bead-and-cove-strips.html I guess what I'm saying is that it either takes a lot of work and the proper equipment or it takes the money to pay someone to do the work who also has the equipment ;)

I think the guy was crazy paying that kind of money for his cedar. Im hoping that mine will just be 2-300euro. Ill be cutting my own into 6mm strips and bead and coving them myself. Ill be also making my own wee router table like your own as ive a router here i bought about 8 years ago and it hasnt seen the light of day since i built my own staircase. Do you know where i can get my hands on some router bits that will do the job im looking.



As many as you can poissibly afford. You can get by with only a few clamps, but it will mean that you have to work in small sections and wait for the glue to dry and then move on to the next. I could be working a lot faster if I had more clamps myself. There are many acceptable ways to do this. Some people get by with very few clamps by using rubber tubes instead of clamps. Some online searches will find you some websites of people using this method. There is a guy building the same canoe that I am building (he is almost finished) and he used bungee cords instead of clamps and his turned out beautiful! http://www.avanthon.com/page/2/

I hope that helps, I think I answered all the questions. I've made some more progress today so I'll be posting up some more pics tonight.



Ill get myself some clamps but i wont be able to get that many as im on a tight budget. I posted above what i can get for now and if it comes to it, ill try and get some bungey cord and do what that guy done. Cheers again for the info.

gstanfield
01-20-2012, 04:19 PM
Your order list above looks like a pretty good place to start, it should get you through most of the build and then you can pick up extra stuff a little at a time as the fund become avaliable. I'm not really sure what to recommend when it comes to clamps as I am using a variety and as the strips start to curve over the clamping needs change so I don't know what I will be using when I get farther along??? (BTW, I find it funny that the clamps we call a "C" clamp you guys call a "G" clamp)

As far as where to buy stuff, you'll be better off taking the advice from the guys on the Song of the Paddle since any source I give you will require import taxes and expensive shipping. ;)

P.L.Lenihan
01-20-2012, 07:19 PM
Just dropping in to say I really enjoy following your progress George and appreciate also your running tab on time/expenses

Your router table set up for doing the bead and coves is the cats' meow! I love it!!

Continued success and thank you for taking the time to document so well and sharing it with us all!



Cheers!


Peter

gstanfield
01-20-2012, 07:25 PM
Thanks Peter! It's good to hear from you and it's especially nice to know that you're enjoying the thread. I certainly got plenty of enjoyment out of your build thread :)

Today's progress included another 1.5 hours for a total of 26.25 hours and $231.10 invested. The results of today's progress:
http://a1.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/395054_1812324365706_1767938069_909392_1382199383_ n.jpg

RLT
01-21-2012, 07:16 PM
mrxireland,

The bungey method works well until you get to the turn of the bilge. As long as the bungey pulls the strip into the previous one you won't have a problem. When you get to the turn of the bilge the bungey starts to pull down instead of into the previous strip you may need to change clamping methods. I started with 3/16th bungey and I thought it was too weak. I then used 1/4 bungey and I thought that it was too strong. You will have to decide what works for you.

Randy

gstanfield
01-21-2012, 07:28 PM
Howdy Randy, glad to have your input. I was going to send you an e-mail sometime in the next few days and ask what clamping method you used after rounding the bilge. I just laid strip #7 tonight and it's starting to turn enough to make me worry about how I'm going to clamp it.

Thanks,

gstanfield
01-21-2012, 09:19 PM
More strips in place, getting close to the point where I must get more creative with my clamping. Here's where she sits currently:
http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/399406_1815617408030_1767938069_910548_766314823_n .jpg

Total investment to date: 27.25 hours and $231.10

Tim Marchetti
01-22-2012, 02:01 PM
Looking good George. Why not use staples? The beauty of using staples is that you can keep going.

gstanfield
01-22-2012, 02:32 PM
Thanks Tim.

You're talking about using staples between the frames? I guess I've never heard of anyone doing that before. I always assumed they had to be pulled together really tight while the glue dried:o

I'll give it a try and see how it works out. This project is simply a learning project for future builds anyway so it's not like I can really go wrong:d

RLT
01-22-2012, 05:36 PM
George,

I would recommend trying web straps to replace your long clamps. Susan Van Leuven uses them in her book "Illustrated Guide to Wood Strip Canoe Building". The web straps work on the same principle as the bungey cord but I think that it would work better. I had a problem getting the strips to lie properly between station 1 and the stem and between station 7 and the stem. I build a stout frame around the canoe at about the inner edge of the stem mold. I would then clamp a stick to hold the strip in place while the glue dried. I could not find any pictures of the setup otherwise I would have posted it.

Randy

gstanfield
01-22-2012, 05:39 PM
Thanks Randy, I've give that a try too. I might as well experiment as much as possible on this build!

Tim Marchetti
01-22-2012, 07:52 PM
Thanks Tim.

You're talking about using staples between the frames? I guess I've never heard of anyone doing that before. I always assumed they had to be pulled together really tight while the glue dried:o

I'll give it a try and see how it works out. This project is simply a learning project for future builds anyway so it's not like I can really go wrong:d

Doesn't Gilpatricks use staples in his book? He does in the first edition. It's very simple, you just squeeze the strips together by hand and drive a staple across the seam where ever you need it. And, because there are no clamps in the way you can just keep adding strips. Some folks don't like all the staple holes, but I always paint my hulls.

gstanfield
01-22-2012, 10:39 PM
well Tim, after re-reading his book for the 73rd time I noticed that he does in fact briefly mention it in the 2nd edition book. He lists it as an option right before saying "do whatever it takes" :)

I'll give it a shot and see how it works, those little holes aren't all that obvious anyway.

Thanks,

mrxireland
01-23-2012, 09:44 AM
George,

I would recommend trying web straps to replace your long clamps. Susan Van Leuven uses them in her book "Illustrated Guide to Wood Strip Canoe Building". The web straps work on the same principle as the bungey cord but I think that it would work better. I had a problem getting the strips to lie properly between station 1 and the stem and between station 7 and the stem. I build a stout frame around the canoe at about the inner edge of the stem mold. I would then clamp a stick to hold the strip in place while the glue dried. I could not find any pictures of the setup otherwise I would have posted it.

Randy

What do you mean whenyou say web straps




Doesn't Gilpatricks use staples in his book? He does in the first edition. It's very simple, you just squeeze the strips together by hand and drive a staple across the seam where ever you need it. And, because there are no clamps in the way you can just keep adding strips. Some folks don't like all the staple holes, but I always paint my hulls.


When you mention staples what do you mean. Is it stapleing the two strips together where ever the clamp would be I dnt really mind having a few staple holes if it means not using clamps. The quicker i get the boat finished the better thou i have to start 1st
;)

Bert Langley
01-23-2012, 10:16 AM
http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b8d807b3127ccec420fae6b74f00000040O00CYt2TVmxcMQ e3nws/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/


My, less then elegant but very effective solution is to use a sort of Spanish Windlass type of arrangement. Large diameter nylon cord tightened using a short piece of left over wood strip. With a little practice and some careful alignment you can easily bring your strips tightly together. obviously you can only do one set of strips at a time, but I am seldom in a hurry when stripping a boat anyway. Also since this arrangement is cheap, it is the only time I can say I have all the clamps I need.

Canoez
01-23-2012, 10:26 AM
When you mention staples what do you mean. Is it stapleing the two strips together where ever the clamp would be I dnt really mind having a few staple holes if it means not using clamps. The quicker i get the boat finished the better thou i have to start 1st
;)

Staples - from a staple gun. Usually 9/16" leg length for stapling at the forms. You need to set your stapler up so that it doesn't drive them all the way down and crush the strips. Staples should only go into the strip itself, if you can, as "bridging" across a pair of strips can restrict the amount of motion the strip has if you're using cove and bead. That being said, stapling two strips together (using 1/4" staples - used between the forms to avoid chipping out the back of the strips) is often used to keep balky strips in place when they start to separate between the forms due to compound curvature.

gstanfield
01-25-2012, 08:53 PM
OK, I took Tim's advice and used staples and man is it a lot quicker! This hull is not the piece of furniture that a lot of guys can build, in fact it's main purpose is to better learn the cedar strip process before building a bigger canoe for the whole family. I'm learning a lot and the progress is more than acceptable to me. So far I worked on it for three and a half hours today and laid down a half dozen strips or more.
http://a8.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/418200_1828552611402_1767938069_915388_2024883497_ n.jpg

For those wondering what the staple across the strips looks like, here is what I'm doing in places I need to hold them together:
http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/408155_1828551651378_1767938069_915387_614474140_n .jpg

Total investment at this point: 28.75 hours and $231.10

Thanks for looking,

Tim Marchetti
01-25-2012, 09:22 PM
Looking good George. It will look great. Are you alternating sides?

gstanfield
01-25-2012, 09:33 PM
Yes, alternating one strip at a time. I did get carried away this morning and did two strips on one side then came back and did two on the other to get back on track. In the pic above I am starting run #12 on this side after just finishing run #11 on the other side.

Tim Marchetti
01-26-2012, 07:48 AM
Nice! She'll be closed up in no time.

gstanfield
01-26-2012, 10:40 AM
Thanks Tim, I hope to have it close before bed tonight. All I have to do today is drive into town and pick up some supplies (food, diapers, etc) so I'll have most of the day to spend on the canoe. :)

(sometimes I wish town were a little closer)

Tim Marchetti
01-26-2012, 11:02 AM
Thanks Tim, I hope to have it close before bed tonight. All I have to do today is drive into town and pick up some supplies (food, diapers, etc) so I'll have most of the day to spend on the canoe. :)

(sometimes I wish town were a little closer)

Good Luck. Give us a picture of the whole boat

gstanfield
01-26-2012, 12:29 PM
Will do Tim, I'll get some pics tonight from various angles. The reason most pics are from that angle is the need for a tripod in the dim shop and there's something to sit the camera on just in front of the canoe ;) I'll bring my tripod out to the shop tonight though :)

gstanfield
01-26-2012, 09:50 PM
AI did not make as much progress today as I wanted to. I ended up having lunch with a friend while I was in town and then I decided to stop in the toy store and saw that they had clamps on sale so I bought a few more clamps of various kinds and then got home and decided to lounge a bit. In all I was able to spend about 2.25 hours on the canoe today.

http://a2.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/402236_1832137221015_1767938069_917081_800224552_n .jpg
http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/398396_1832137381019_1767938069_917082_174551377_n .jpg
http://a5.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/405815_1832131420870_1767938069_917079_523645740_n .jpg

Total investment at this point: 31 hours and $231.10

Tim Marchetti
01-28-2012, 06:31 AM
Nice! Just keep at it.

mrxireland
01-28-2012, 06:44 AM
Looking well! Looks like youll be finished in no time. I see the staples are working a treat and is helping speed things up. Ill be defo doing this with my boat. Cant wait to see yours finished now. What kind of fiberglass are you using, would it be woven roven fiberglass sheet or just fiberglass sheet. The reason im asking this is becaue on my last canoe i built i was told to use wooven roven fiberglass cloth but i dont see gill gillpatrick even mention the stuff in his book. He just says 6oz fiberglass, the stuff i can get is 200g per sqm so its nearly the same and its alot cheaper than wooven roven because if i remember correctly, its 50quid for 10m for the wooven roven but i have sourced fiberglass cloth at 10quid for 10m so as you see, theres a good bit of saving.

mrxireland
01-28-2012, 06:53 AM
http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/398396_1832137381019_1767938069_917082_174551377_n .jpg








As for this picture, are you going to be sanding teh front o fthe canoe. The reason why im asking this is it looks to me that you might have a few gaps. Will up be filling this in with epoxy mixed with cedar flour

gstanfield
01-28-2012, 09:04 AM
Yes, The ends will be shaped and any gaps (there are some) will be filled with thickened epoxy. The gaps aren't as bad as what the picture makes it look, the strips are just long and need trimming ;) I'm not too worried about the ends as I have a special treatment in mind for those...

As for cloth, I'll be getting my cloth and epoxy the same place I always do: http://boatbuildercentral.com/

gstanfield
02-02-2012, 10:40 PM
Alright, I've made some progress this week, but not as much as I'd like. I'm hoping to really improve on that the next few days though. Total count at this point I have 34.5 strips in place and at the widest point I still have another 19 strips to go. The sad part is that it looks like I'm going to come up short by two strips! Oh well, worse things have happened!

Today's progress picture is just a crummy cell phone pic, but I'll take a good one when I get further along. You can see that I have started roughing in the bow a little bit and yes there are going to be a few small holes in it where I didn't really try to get the strips perfect. That's not an issue at all and you'll understand why later on when you see what I'm doing (it's a secret for now)

http://a2.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/394030_1855345041196_1767938069_926177_215870810_n .jpg

Total investment at this point: 35.5 hours and $231.10

Have a great day

mrxireland
02-03-2012, 11:31 AM
35 hours, thats not bad. I would have thought it would take longer to get to this stage.

gstanfield
02-03-2012, 03:31 PM
35 hours includes two round trips to town (6 hours total) as well as time spent building a router table and the strongback. I figure the next one will take about 20 hours to get to this point :)

gstanfield
02-04-2012, 05:44 PM
A little more progress today. I'll be putting at least 4 more strips in before I stop for the night, but I needed a break so I thought I'd snap some shots and show how far I have made it.

As you can see I've been hitting it hard with the staples. These last few strips are just really tough as they don't want to bend so much. I probably should have used narrower strips, but it's working as long as I don't mind the staple holes! I do feel really good about my joining. At first I just could not make two strips fit tight together and it was really making me mad. It finally clicked in my head what I was doing wrong and now each one fits better than the one before. I can't wait to get the staples out and start fairing this thing.

http://i41.servimg.com/u/f41/11/81/01/07/canoe_16.jpg

http://i41.servimg.com/u/f41/11/81/01/07/canoe_18.jpg

Total investment as of now is 37.5 hours and $231.10 and I counted up today and the hours actually laying strips is only 18.25

with experience, warmer weather and better clamping methods these things can actually go together pretty darn quick!

Tim Marchetti
02-04-2012, 06:05 PM
Looking good

mrxireland
02-08-2012, 10:43 AM
Ahttp://i41.servimg.com/u/f41/11/81/01/07/canoe_16.jpg






What way are you finishing the bottom of the canoe. Will you be adding one side with cedar strips then cutting a straight line so you can work to with the other cedar strips or will you be finishing just like you have in these pics because it looks to me that your doing 1 strip at each side so they fold into each other, would i be right in my thinking.

Lewisboater
02-08-2012, 10:57 AM
Last (and only) time I did a strip canoe...we went t'other way. We started with the "football", getting it symmetric then stripped alternating sides until we got to the gunnel.

gstanfield
02-08-2012, 03:21 PM
Interesting idea Steve, I've watched a lot of them being built, but I've never seen someone start at the bottom. It actually makes sense that it would work good :)

Wavewacker
02-08-2012, 04:27 PM
More strips in place, getting close to the point where I must get more creative with my clamping. Here's where she sits currently:
http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/399406_1815617408030_1767938069_910548_766314823_n .jpg

Total investment to date: 27.25 hours and $231.10

Hi, great job and it is showing me alot. Just a comment, a kayak builder I know uses some C clamps, but he will put a small piece of plywood (1/4'' or so) between the project surface and the metal surface of the clamp. He has used all kinds of trash pieces, plastic or whatever as well. It keeps the metal from making a dimple from the pressure in the project surface.

You're probably not tightening the clamps hard enoung to dimple the wood, and I see you really know what you're doing, but just saying as a wood working project that some woods will easily dimple, like a hammer mark after driving a nail, eeeek!

gstanfield
02-08-2012, 05:48 PM
Good point on the clamp marks. Most of my clamps have rubber feet on them, the ones that don't (only 2 in the above photo) are very lightly clamped in place as a guide to keep the strips in line, not any actual clamping force. Still it is a very valid point and I'm glad you brought it up. :)

As I've mentioned before, this is my first strip build, and only my 5th build overall. I'm mainly using this one as a learning experience for the build method and have been trying many different techniques for clamping, aligning, etc on this build. I have some more ideas that I want to try out on this canoe before I finish and I'll post the pics of the results and decide then if I like it or if it's just something to sell cheap on craiglist to buy more cedar and epoxy ;)

Thanks again for the input and compliments and especialyl for pointing out the potential hazard of clamping incorrectly!

JayInOz
02-08-2012, 06:08 PM
George you're building a twelve foot canoe using eight foot strips- so where are the joins? :) Have you actually spliced strips or just end glued them? How many strips do you reckon you will use?
Will Douglas Fir strips make a decent canoe? Last year I helped haul some very old doug fir timbers from a demolished livestock pavillion at the local showground to the town museum, where the volunteers planned to use them to build a shed to house more old machinery. Well the shed's finished and a lot of the beams were left over- I can buy a few lengths cheap- old growth, straight grained, fourteen feet by six" by 2 1/2"- I is grinnin':) What size would you suggest I rip them? JayInOz

gstanfield
02-08-2012, 06:20 PM
Well sir, like I said above this is a learning experience and so I have done different methods. I have scarfed some strips into longer ones and others I just butt jointed to see how it works. It's getting epoxy/glass inside and out with two layers of glass on the outside bottom so I'm sure it will be strong enough.

As for using fir, I'm sure it will work but I'm no expert! :) I've spoken with guys who have built strip planked boats from a lot of different woods with weight being one of the main considerations.

As to the size to cut your strips, I'd leave the thickness up to the designer to decide and I made mine from boards that were just over an inch thick. I get roughly 15/16" covereage per strip after you take the bed and cove cuts into consideration. Making the strips smaller would help them to bend better, but more time in laying the extra strips. I guess it would really depend on the boat you're building. My next strip project will be much larger... ;)

Maybe a new thread would get you some answers by people who know more about this than I do. I'm just a cop pretending to be a woodworker :)

JayInOz
02-08-2012, 06:36 PM
Maybe a new thread would get you some answers by people who know more about this than I do. I'm just a cop pretending to be a woodworker :)

Thanks for the reply George. I'm not to the stage of requiring a new thread yet- plenty of other jobs on the go at the moment. And nothing wrong with being a cop pretending to be a woodworker- if it was the other way around however- that would be a whole nuther animal:) Jay (not sir) InOz

gstanfield
02-08-2012, 06:54 PM
:) oh yeah, it's a 14ft boat, not a 12ft ;)


... if it was the other way around however- that would be a whole nuther animal...

Ain't that the truth! As a follow up, I just called and asked a friend who has built several strip boats and he built one once out of pine just because pine is cheap and he intended to paint it anyway. He said it worked just as good as any cedar boat he ever built, it was just a tad heavier. He figured that any wood that works good with epoxy should work just fine for a strip boat. As long as it will bend decent, the only downside being weight.

Tim Marchetti
02-08-2012, 07:13 PM
:) oh yeah, it's a 14ft boat, not a 12ft ;)



Ain't that the truth! As a follow up, I just called and asked a friend who has built several strip boats and he built one once out of pine just because pine is cheap and he intended to paint it anyway. He said it worked just as good as any cedar boat he ever built, it was just a tad heavier. He figured that any wood that works good with epoxy should work just fine for a strip boat. As long as it will bend decent, the only downside being weight.
Dour fir is much harder to work with, it's much heavier and it might not bend without steaming. I tried to build my first canoe with pine. It was a 10ft pack canoe and the pine would not take the bends and twist. So I ended up tearing off the pine and starting over. For a canoe that you want to carry and paddle I would only use cedar.

gstanfield
02-08-2012, 07:18 PM
There you go! Like I said, I'm no expert :)

Wavewacker
02-08-2012, 07:36 PM
And you're 5 1/2 boats ahead of me! LOL

Looking good, I want to see how you seal the bow up too!

gstanfield
02-08-2012, 07:46 PM
Yes, that part will be my departure from "normal" in more ways than one...

:) (sorry, no spoiler. Maybe in a week or two I'll be that far!)

gstanfield
02-08-2012, 09:32 PM
Just a crummy cell phone shot for tonight, but it's better than nothing. I almost have the hull closed, just a few more strips to lay and she'll be ready for fairing :)!!!

http://i41.servimg.com/u/f41/11/81/01/07/phone_13.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=262&u=11810107)

Total at this point: 41.5 hours and $231.10

The monetary investment is about to change as I have to order some epoxy and glass this week!

gstanfield
02-09-2012, 02:23 PM
I'll go back out later with the camera and take a propert picture more fitting of this milestone, but here she is all closed up!

http://i41.servimg.com/u/f41/11/81/01/07/canoe_19.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=263&u=11810107)

Total investment at this point is $231.10 and 44.5 hours including 25.25 hours laying strips! Now I gotta order some fiberglass and epoxy and do some sanding :)

Tim Marchetti
02-09-2012, 02:48 PM
way to go!

gstanfield
02-09-2012, 03:24 PM
Thanks Tim :)

mrxireland
02-09-2012, 04:15 PM
F**king brilliant man, cant wait to see it sanded and fiberglassed. Ive been keeping a good eye on this because ill be building teh same one after i finish my row boat. Why dont you take a week of work so you can get it finished quicker so i can see it finished before i start my row boat;)

gstanfield
02-09-2012, 04:22 PM
Thanks :) The cold temps in my shop are more of a factor than work. I actually only work 3 days one week and 4 the next :)

mrxireland
02-09-2012, 04:41 PM
Thanks :) The cold temps in my shop are more of a factor than work. I actually only work 3 days one week and 4 the next :)


Im near sure that its to be warm in there for the epoxy to set properly. Do you have heaters in the workshop?

gstanfield
02-09-2012, 05:55 PM
Yes. I've built several boats in this shop and dealt with cold weather and epoxy. It's not fun, but I'm experienced at making it work ;) The issue is that it takes several hours to bring the temps high enough to work in as most days this time of year the temps are between 0 to 20F (-18 to -7C) and the shop is large and not very well insulated :(

It'll work out OK though, now that the stripping is done I have some time of snading before I'm ready for epoxy and if I have to I will move the whole thing into my smaller shop that is better insulated and heated, but I'd rather work on it where it is. Time will tell...

JayInOz
02-09-2012, 07:13 PM
Looking good George!
Thanks for the advice Tim. Douglas fir is what I have- the only red cedar I've ever seen in my neck of the woods was thin cladding on a couple of kit homes. I'm hundreds of miles from anyone who might supply it. I have access to lots of local timber here, but the lightest of it is heavier than oak- none of it floats when dry! As for steaming- done a bit of that making recurve bows and handles for broadaxes, adzes etc. What about boiling it? Works with ash- or would fir take up too much water?
Hey Mrx howzabout hitting the edit post thingie and taking out the swearing? This is a family forum and I for one find it highly offernsive. JayInOz

Tim Marchetti
02-09-2012, 08:42 PM
Looking good George!
Thanks for the advice Tim. Douglas fir is what I have- the only red cedar I've ever seen in my neck of the woods was thin cladding on a couple of kit homes. I'm hundreds of miles from anyone who might supply it. I have access to lots of local timber here, but the lightest of it is heavier than oak- none of it floats when dry! As for steaming- done a bit of that making recurve bows and handles for broadaxes, adzes etc. What about boiling it? Works with ash- or would fir take up too much water?
Hey Mrx howzabout hitting the edit post thingie and taking out the swearing? This is a family forum and I for one find it highly offernsive. JayInOz
If fir is the only wood you can use then look for designs with long smooth waterlines

JayInOz
02-10-2012, 04:34 AM
Does that mean reduced stability Tim? Any suggestions? Could the extra weight be taken advantage of to make a reasonable sailing canoe? Sorry George- kinda elbowed my way in here:) JayInOz

MoMan
02-10-2012, 07:45 AM
OK, I took Tim's advice and used staples and man is it a lot quicker! This hull is not the piece of furniture that a lot of guys can build, in fact it's main purpose is to better learn the cedar strip process before building a bigger canoe for the whole family. I'm learning a lot and the progress is more than acceptable to me. So far I worked on it for three and a half hours today and laid down a half dozen strips or more.
http://a8.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/418200_1828552611402_1767938069_915388_2024883497_ n.jpg



It's a little late for your current build, but I found bike tubes and spring clamps very effective. I could do 2 or 3 strips: get staples very tight on the forms, then go back and tighten up the fields w/ tubes and clamps.

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5097/5572584135_a57de982ac.jpg

mrxireland
02-10-2012, 09:02 AM
It's a little late for your current build, but I found bike tubes and spring clamps very effective. I could do 2 or 3 strips: get staples very tight on the forms, then go back and tighten up the fields w/ tubes and clamps.

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5097/5572584135_a57de982ac.jpg


Can you define abit more exactly what you do mo. Do you lay 3 strips then put the tubes around the strips. tighten then staple then move on to the next 3 ?

Just out of curiosity, whats the max amount of strips per day can be laid

mrxireland
02-10-2012, 09:06 AM
Hey Mrx howzabout hitting the edit post thingie and taking out the swearing? This is a family forum and I for one find it highly offernsive. JayInOz


Im suprised at an ozzy coming of with this,lol, because yous usely cant put a sentence together without using a swear word, abit like us irish and if this sort of thing offends you, you seriously need to get out in the real world abit more
:p

gstanfield
02-10-2012, 09:28 AM
MoMan, good suggestion. I had seen those before, but took the lazy way out :)

Tim Marchetti
02-10-2012, 09:35 AM
Does that mean reduced stability Tim? Any suggestions? Could the extra weight be taken advantage of to make a reasonable sailing canoe? Sorry George- kinda elbowed my way in here:) JayInOz

You don't have to loose stability if the boat is long enough. An 18ft. boat with a 36" beam is going to be easier to plank than a 12ft. boat with a 36" beam. The modulus of elasticity of doug fir is 2 times that of cedar and it's density is 1.4 times greater. Feel free to email me, so we don't hog Georges build thread.

MoMan
02-10-2012, 08:20 PM
Can you define abit more exactly what you do mo. Do you lay 3 strips then put the tubes around the strips. tighten then staple then move on to the next 3 ?

Just out of curiosity, whats the max amount of strips per day can be laid

First, I would apply glue to one strip, then press the strip firmly in place in the bead/cover and against the form, then drive staples thru the strip and into the forms. Repeat with another strip. Once the staples were in place, I positioned the tubes between the forms and held them w/ the spring clamps. As I worked my way up the sides and over the bilge turn, I applied the tubes from above the strips: Stretch the tube over the strip(s), just enough tension to pull things together, then apply the spring clamp over the strips:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7042/6854181353_873e8c018d.jpg

As for max strips per day, I only did three or four per side each night. Someone more experienced could likely do more.

P.L.Lenihan
02-11-2012, 04:57 AM
I'll go back out later with the camera and take a propert picture more fitting of this milestone, but here she is all closed up!

http://i41.servimg.com/u/f41/11/81/01/07/canoe_19.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=263&u=11810107)

Total investment at this point is $231.10 and 44.5 hours including 25.25 hours laying strips! Now I gotta order some fiberglass and epoxy and do some sanding :)


I think you must have forgotten to add the cost of your "shutter" plank libation George! Congrats on this excellent milestone!!



Cheers!



Peter

mrxireland
02-11-2012, 03:46 PM
I just found this and thought id post it here to show yous about it. Looks a good wee bit kit but the price is abit crazy TBH.

http://www.canadiancanoes.com/StapleFreeConstructionKits.php

gstanfield
02-11-2012, 04:20 PM
Very expensive, but neat system. I'm not too worried about a few little holes though, certainly not $400 worth of worried about it :)

gstanfield
02-11-2012, 07:28 PM
Pulled all 1100 staples today and did some sanding. It took an hour and a half just to pull staples! I came in, finished my beer and orderd some more paper. I'll grab a pic tonight or tomorrow after I do some more sanding, but for now I'm at 47.0 hours and $263.60

...still need to order some epoxy and glass

Tim Marchetti
02-16-2012, 07:33 AM
Pulled all 1100 staples today and did some sanding. It took an hour and a half just to pull staples! I came in, finished my beer and orderd some more paper. I'll grab a pic tonight or tomorrow after I do some more sanding, but for now I'm at 47.0 hours and $263.60

...still need to order some epoxy and glass
The suspense is killing me.

gstanfield
02-16-2012, 05:57 PM
Sorry, I've been working a lot and sanding a lot and just forgot to take a pic. I'll snap a shot after I finish sanding tonight I promise!

gstanfield
02-16-2012, 10:52 PM
Well, after 3.25 hours of cold sanding the hull is getting pretty fair. I still have a lot more work to do, figure another 2.5 hours before it's fair enough to start with the epoxy. There are a few cracks and plenty of screw holes to fill with thickened epoxy and so far I have made about half a gallon of cedar flour from sanding :lol:

http://i41.servimg.com/u/f41/11/81/01/07/canoe_20.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=264&u=11810107)
http://i41.servimg.com/u/f41/11/81/01/07/canoe_21.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=265&u=11810107)

So, a total of 50.25 hours and $263.60 into this project so far. :)

Oyster
02-17-2012, 12:40 AM
looking good george,
you ever spend any time on pathfinder?
royce

mrxireland
02-17-2012, 08:23 AM
Yep i agree, looking very good. Cant see to many staple holes either. Will them screw holes show through much thou. Cant wait to see it glassed/epoxyed. My cedar is on its way and i really hope that mines is real light like yours because im not that fond of it all being the darkish red coulour. when do you think you'll have it coated with epoxy?

Tim Marchetti
02-17-2012, 09:22 AM
Looking good. Are using a sanding board to fair with?

gstanfield
02-17-2012, 12:29 PM
Thanks for the compliments guys.

Oyster, I do spend some time on pathfinder or rather I did when I had my larger boat. Since I moved from Casper I don't hit pathfinder very much at all. From my house to Alcova is 62 miles (far enough) and it's smaller and more sheltered which works good for the small boats and canoes that I use now. I miss pathfinder, but it's a big boat lake!

Tim, I'm using a variety of tools including a longboard, a RO and yes even a beltsander. BTW, I do NOT recommend a beltsander on a project llike this unless you have a few hundred hours experience using one. They can and will destroy things very fast if you mess up. I've done enough sanding with one that I can basically use it like a longboard but it took years of sanding to get that way and even so I could make a big mistake any minute and regret ever pulling it out of the cabinet.

First canoe build, not first time woodworking ;) (a fact that is cleverly disquised by some of the rookie mistakes I made on this project despite telling myself I was messing up at the time I did it)

gstanfield
02-17-2012, 12:31 PM
oh yeah, if that last post came across as cocky don't take it that way. Rather take it that even with years of experience with wood and several previous boat builds I'm still learning and I still made some mistakes along the way. Some of the issues I have created myself came about from my original plan to partially paint the exterior from the waterline down and a line sweeping up the stems (that's the big secret I was hiding) I have since been convinced to leave it bright all over which means some of my "good enough" moments when stripping it are now "extra sanding" moments in fairing :(

ucbamboorodmaker
02-19-2012, 08:16 PM
New guy here. I've been wanting to build a strip canoe for a long time now. Starting reading books several years ago on the subject. Bought the router bits a couple years ago and have all the other necessary tools. A couple months ago I tore an add on room out of the garage that I had been using as a bamboo rod making room. Now I even have enough space. So I thought since I wanted a canoe that I could handle by myself I would build the Puddle Duck. So I typed it into the search bar and up came this thread. I've been checking in a couple times a day. Now I'm like Tim Marchetti up there " The suspence is killing me"

gstanfield
02-20-2012, 12:17 AM
I'm excited to see the interest guys, unfortunately I've had the influenza twice now in three weeks. It's kicking my butt worse than I've ever had it. To make matters worse there was nobody to cover my shift and so I'm working a night shift in a nasty snowstorm with this crud :( I'm being a bit naughty though, I'm staying in my nice warm office until I get a call and have to go out in this stuff. Oh well, maybe I'll be back to the boat here in a few more days :)

ucbamboorodmaker, welcome to the forum :)

Tim Marchetti
02-20-2012, 08:13 AM
feel better George

gstanfield
02-20-2012, 08:20 AM
Thanks Tim. only 90 more minutes left of my shift and then I can climb into a nice warm bed and sleep the day away stuffed full of medications :)

ucbamboorodmaker
02-20-2012, 08:11 PM
Yea! Hope you get to feeling better real soon. I know when I get one of those bad ones the last thing I would want to do is work on a boat in the garage, or do anything for that matter.

Floyd

gstanfield
02-20-2012, 10:29 PM
Thanks Floyd. Tonight is my last shift this week so I'm going to get some work done in the next few days if it kills me!

White River
02-24-2012, 10:43 AM
So did you plane and or use a spoke shave at all or did you go right to sanding? I am on my second canoe build and was wondering how much more sanding it is over the shaping then sanding. Looking good!

gstanfield
02-24-2012, 11:44 AM
Straight to sanding. I did use a sureform plane/rasp on the stems to rough them in before sanding, but otherwise it was sand, sand, sand away! I'm sure there are many ways to get the job done, but this is what is working for me.

(still sick guys, so no progress this week either)

stanrich
03-04-2012, 09:33 AM
First visit to this building thread. Looking good. Really appreciate all the expert responses, great ideas for strip planking, and your humble repose throughout. Been a while since your last post so I hope you have recovered from your illness and will soon be back to the building.

P.L.Lenihan
03-09-2012, 04:24 AM
Just a bump to egg George on toward any fresh up-dates on this wonderful build.



Cheers!

Peter

gstanfield
03-09-2012, 09:04 AM
Thanks for the bumps gentlemen. Unfortunately I am still sickly and it's no fun at all! Never in my life have I been sick more than a few days at a time and this is a month now that I've been down. Everytime I feel better for a day I get sicker that night. I think I may do some work on it today even if it kills me!

MoMan
03-09-2012, 02:14 PM
Hope you feel better soon, George. When I came down with a mild fever a few weeks back my wife said, "Wow, you must really be sick--you didn't even open the garage door tonight."

mrxireland
03-14-2012, 11:29 AM
Are you feeling any better lately G. When your up and running again can you take a pic of your router set up with the other router bit on. The reason why im asking this ill be using the same method with mounting my router underneath some ply but i think ive to router out some of the ply because if i were to run a strip beside it, the router bit seems to high even thou its touching the ply.

MoMan
03-23-2012, 01:07 PM
I guess it's time for another bump.

So George, have you wound up in a hospital with a host of cute, young nurses swooning over you? I'm hoping the answer is yes (at least as far as the nurses go) because I would like to hear the details of that experience.

--Mike

gstanfield
03-23-2012, 01:33 PM
well, my wife is a nurse and she's been taking care of me, does that count?

I'm finally healed up, but in the process my shop has gotten full of paying jobs that I've been working to get out. I've done some minor sanding on the canoe, but nothing worthy of a pic. I'm headed to town to buy some paint now for a car I'm fixing up, but I have decided that I will be working on the canoe tonight no matter what! Stay tuned late tonight or tomorrow morning for an actual update! :)

mrxireland
03-23-2012, 02:29 PM
Thats great your all healed up, i cant wait to see this canoe when its all wetted out because the wood looks lovely.

Tim Marchetti
03-23-2012, 03:15 PM
welcome back to the living George

MoMan
03-23-2012, 06:55 PM
... nothing worthy of a pic.

No such thing!

Good to hear you are back, even if it is for other projects.

gstanfield
03-23-2012, 10:35 PM
Thanks for the continued support and encouragement gentlemen! I did manage to get about an hours worth of sanding in on the canoe tonight. The pic is a crummy cell phone pic because I didn't feel like dragging the tripod out for the real camera. It's so grainy looking because the air was still full of dust :)

http://i41.servimg.com/u/f41/11/81/01/07/03231210.jpg

That sheet of MDO behind it is for my next project in line. I'm building Dave Gentry's Chuckanut 12 SOF kayak for solo fishing. I laid out all the frames tonight in about a half an hour, then decided to get to sanding before I came up with an excuse to not sand tonight!

Total to date 51.25 hours and $263.60 invested.

Oyster
03-23-2012, 11:15 PM
go george go
royce

jim seemann
03-24-2012, 10:03 PM
A very nice project and well documented too!

gstanfield
03-24-2012, 10:49 PM
Thanks for the interest gentlemen :)

mrxireland
03-27-2012, 11:30 AM
When do you think youll have the fiberglass and epoxy on the canoe G.

gstanfield
03-28-2012, 08:09 PM
Soon I hope. I have several paying jobs that come first.

gstanfield
04-07-2012, 06:50 PM
Well, finally some more progress. I finished sanding the outside of the hull and then on the advice of an expereinced builder I wet it down with steamy hot water to raise the grain and help swell shut the staple holes and close up the screw holes a little bit. It also brought out the true color of the wood which I met with mixed feelings. When dry the accent strips looked to be a nice contrasting red, but now it's color varies a lot and kinda makes me sad. Also, when dry the butt joints did not look so bad because I had matched the colors pretty good, but when wet they colors do not match as well and so the joints really stand out. I'll still be happy with it and like I stated at the beginning it is a learning experience so you just gotta roll with the punches and keep learning. My next one I will build with strips long enough that they do not have joints and I will do my accent stripe different as well :)

http://i41.servimg.com/u/f41/11/81/01/07/canoe_22.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=282&u=11810107)

http://i41.servimg.com/u/f41/11/81/01/07/canoe_23.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=283&u=11810107)

http://i41.servimg.com/u/f41/11/81/01/07/canoe_24.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=284&u=11810107)

http://i41.servimg.com/u/f41/11/81/01/07/canoe_25.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=285&u=11810107)

and dang it's hard to keep a shop clean when you use the same shop for mechanical work on both cars and motorcycles, collision repair, woodworking and boat building!

Total investment to date is 52.75 hours and $263.60

gstanfield
04-07-2012, 06:58 PM
One more shot just to show the bow profile:

http://i41.servimg.com/u/f41/11/81/01/07/canoe_26.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=286&u=11810107)

Vernon
04-07-2012, 07:18 PM
I've been watching this build from the beginning, good work on all of it. It's neat to see the hours and dollars tallied as you go. I may try to have the discipline to track my next build in that way, but in my case it would have to be tracked in dollars, time working, and time puttin around in the area. :)
Vern

gstanfield
04-07-2012, 07:26 PM
Thanks Vern. I just finished catching up on your build, I hadn't checked in on it since you started making the paddles, good progress pard.

There's been plenty of time wasted, but for the most part I always have two or three projects in the shop at any given time. The time tally came about as I keep a clipboard in the shop to track hours on the paying jobs and figured I'd go ahead and make a labor sheet for the canoe just for fun. When I swap from canoe to paying project I bascially clock in and out on it and then at the end fo the day add up the time spent actually working on each project and punch it in my accouting spreadsheet. It's way too much work for a hobby, but like I said; I work on boats when I need a break from the paying work so why not keep good records ;)

mrxireland
04-08-2012, 05:22 AM
I love the colours of the canoe G and this is the colour that i actuly wanted when buying my cedar but they only had the darkish type. I think ill be a bit disapointed when i wet mine out because i think mines is all going to look far to dark for my liking. IMO, yous would have look lovely with some sort of dark timber for your accent strip, maybe somthing like mahogany,oak or even black walnut but like you mention, you could possibly do something like this on your next build. I already have ideas for my next build and im not even half way through this one ,lol.

mrxireland
04-08-2012, 05:25 AM
http://i41.servimg.com/u/f41/11/81/01/07/canoe_24.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=284&u=11810107)




Just a wee question about the white strip that pops out to you in this picture. Is that part of the strip or did you add that piece in

gstanfield
04-08-2012, 11:31 AM
It's just part of the wood, a section of almost solid white cedar. If you look at the accent stripe that was supposed to be nice and red you'll see that it fades to almost white in places, it's the same thing going on with that white stripe there. I'm no wood expert so I can't explain it??

And you'll notice more knots in the bottom portion. That's because I was running out of good strips and using what I could salvage from what was originally my discard pile. The bottom gets extra glass and possibly some paint or graphite anyway so I'm not worried.

:)

Tim Marchetti
04-08-2012, 01:47 PM
It's going to look great and you will enjoy it more than any other canoe you have ever used

gstanfield
04-08-2012, 02:09 PM
Thanks Tim. I'll be getting with you sometime for a set of plans on a freighter, probably a 20 footer...

Grand Chillin
04-08-2012, 11:44 PM
Well now, look what I found. George, you have been holding out on us.:rolleyes: Nice job and great presentation.BY:D I have the plans for a Gatorboats strip build and your thread has been a great help. You mentioned something about moving to Georgia, where are you thinking about?

Keep up the good work,
Chip

chainyank
04-09-2012, 03:20 PM
Ahh, this brings back fond memories! I built this little duck when I was 13 years old, after finding Gilpatrick's book on my father's bookshelf. I had broken my leg playing soccer and couldn't mow lawns what with the cast, but I could stand still on one leg, so off I went! I even lost a girlfriend over this boat, she just didn't understand!
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7139/6915866552_d6655555bf_c.jpg

To think, if she'd stuck around, what adventures we could have had!

Well, keep up the good work, and you'll soon be out on the water. Oh, you say your next boat is for solo fishing, but I tell you, this Puddle Duck is made for exactly that!

gstanfield
04-09-2012, 04:02 PM
Thanks for the input guys :)

GC, I'm hoping to make it back to Northeast GA where I'm from. Preferably Rabun county, but I'd settle for Habersham or Stephens county.

Tim Marchetti
04-30-2012, 08:42 AM
time for an update George.

gstanfield
04-30-2012, 10:25 AM
Sorry guys, nothing worth updating. I've been spending my spare time rebuilding a goldwing engine and doing some bodywork on a subaru. I just had one of my deputies call in for Wed and I can't find a cover so I guess I'm working an extra shift this week too. Oh the joys of being a supervisor....

As to the duck, I'll make some more progress on it this week. I did resand the whole thing with finer paper and get one coat of thickened epoxy laid down to fill in the cracks and screw holes. I'll get it sanded and lay another coat of epoxy on this week at the minimal. Pics will follow after more progress :)

mrxireland
06-27-2012, 07:01 AM
Just bumping this to see where your at now ;)

gstanfield
06-27-2012, 02:18 PM
No progress on the Duck lately, it got put on hold while I work on Spira's Crawdad 14' Jonboat.

http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/s720x720/306927_2247623767919_3594286_n.jpg

I'll get back to work on the puddle duck sometime in the future, but I'm really trying to get the crawdad finished in time to do some fishing witht he family before winter hits.

Tim Marchetti
06-27-2012, 03:57 PM
No progress on the Duck lately, it got put on hold while I work on Spira's Crawdad 14' Jonboat.

http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/s720x720/306927_2247623767919_3594286_n.jpg

I'll get back to work on the puddle duck sometime in the future, but I'm really trying to get the crawdad finished in time to do some fishing witht he family before winter hits.
SO.....
where's the crawdad thread????

gstanfield
06-28-2012, 12:59 AM
I'm building it down and dirty, quick and cheap so it's nothing to really spend a lot of time braggin about. It is a nice design though, I may build another one later and use quality materials.

I guess I'll go ahead and start typing up a thread on it tomorrow on it.

Tim Marchetti
06-28-2012, 06:34 AM
Down and dirty is my middle name. There are others out there. In fact, you should call the thread down and dirty crawdad build

gstanfield
06-29-2012, 03:06 PM
It's out there now Tim, when it's finished I will resume construction of the puddle duck, finish my paddleboard and SOF kayak and then decide what to build over the winter!