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David W Pratt
11-13-2011, 09:09 AM
I ran across a new safety practice the other day that I plan to adopt next season: When it is time to reef, it is time to put on a PFD.
That made me think we might all benefit from sharing our own safety practices.
Two others we observe on Truth: If anyone thinks it is time to reef, it is. Also, unless I have a very strong crew aboard, at dusk I take in the jib and tuck a reef in, so I don't have to in the middle of the night.
So what do you all do?
As always, gratuitous, insulting, ad hominem attacks, unrelated to the original topic are welcome.

Paul Pless
11-13-2011, 09:15 AM
As always, gratuitous, insulting, ad hominem attacks, unrelated to the original topic are welcome.Brilliant! May I stand you a Guinness?

S.V. Airlie
11-13-2011, 09:23 AM
I sail alone.Reef or not I always wear a PFD.I also wear a harness that is clipped in at all times. And I practice getting back aboard in case I am ever thrown over.

Even C'dog follows my practices. :)

Chris Coose
11-13-2011, 10:10 AM
Not drinking anymore has eliminated the risk for drinking and drowning.

When the paddle boats go outside the Gut, one of them gets the handheld VHF with instructions repeated.

In the spring and fall I like to know the water temp. which gets added to the risk formula for working around the waterfront. In the winter I always dawn the PFD for the row out to pump the boat.

Ian McColgin
11-13-2011, 11:13 AM
My favorite working PFD for non-rainy days is the Mustang I'm wearing in the ELF photo I use for my avatar. I added a stitched on harness. But that PFD does not fit over oilies so if a PFD's indicated, I use a Mustang auto-inflatable with harness. Either way I can clip on the the jack lines I rig for solo sailing and that make tying in the reef cringles safe.

wizbang 13
11-13-2011, 11:59 AM
My choice of boat is the single biggest safety factor for me .
Of course we are talking offshore sailing right? Not zooming around in a missle. ( I had a ski vest on when I crashed last week, my chest broke the dashboard.)
Anyway, When I was young and was single handing my Seabird Yawl around the Caribbean, I would take the Mainsl down at night because I was afraid of being overcanvassed in a squall.. Ironically this did not make her safer, which eventually I learned.
My slow, heavy, double ender , with her easy motion ,is where safety lies for me.
Too much wind? Sometimes it is safer to let "god" take a sail down. But the boat and rig have to be strong.
I will not go sea on a marconi rigged or fin keel boat. That is an extreme , and convenient and easy thing to say.
There is so much bolt on expensive safety "gear" , but the boat itself is sometimes left out of the equation.

James McMullen
11-13-2011, 12:06 PM
Safety is for sissies! You chumps who wear PFD'S and such probably also expect the Coast Guard to rescue you when you're sinking and the federal nanny state to pay for lighthouses and channel buoys and crap like that. Buncha wimps if you ask me!


(How was that, David?) :D

David W Pratt
11-13-2011, 01:29 PM
Good start James, but you didn't mention how stupid we are or how our answers are typical of people of our political bent. But, as I said, a good start.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
11-13-2011, 02:00 PM
Stolen from elsewhere - and pretty good rules.

Five golden rules. Without further ado – here they are, quoted verbatim from RORC literature.

A harness and lifejacket shall be worn when on deck:

a) Between the hours of sunset and sunrise

b) When alone on deck

c) When reefed

d) When the true wind speed is 25 knots or above

e) When the visibility is less than 1 nautical mile

One addendum to this last rule, suggested by the editor, is “Lifejackets only, when bad visibility. If you are run down you’ll get pulled to the bottom – this happened a few years ago in a trip across the North Sea when three guys drowned.” Certainly, the idea of being tethered to a sinking boat is not a pleasant one.

Paul Girouard
11-13-2011, 02:02 PM
Stolen from elsewhere - and pretty good rules.

One addendum to this last rule, suggested by the editor, is “Lifejackets only, when bad visibility. If you are run down you’ll get pulled to the bottom – this happened a few years ago in a trip across the North Sea when three guys drowned.” Certainly, the idea of being tethered to a sinking boat is not a pleasant one.

Shouldn't there be a knife , along with a strobe light on the PDF?

Tom Hunter
11-13-2011, 02:07 PM
Part of safety is not running aground, here are the rules I followed this Summer as I motored muscle ridge channel for the first time.

Look for all the bouys and channel markers well ahead of time.

Shoot bearings from the markers to objects on land, such as towers, that are marked on the chart. The bearings should be similar.

Identify the shoal areas and rocks. Ask yourself "what would I be looking at if I was heading for that rock?"

Shoot the bearings again.

We got through fine, but I can see why people run aground there.

Rich Jones
11-13-2011, 07:41 PM
Years ago, I wouldn't think of wearing a PFD. Now, with two fake knees and two bum shoulders, I'd sink like a stone, so I never leave shore without putting it on.
Of course, getting in and out of my little solo canoes is an adventure unto itself!

Ian McColgin
11-13-2011, 08:27 PM
Paul, contemporary standards of safety tethers call for easy-open shackles at both ends. You should be able to free yourself with your weaker hand hanging from the tether. Of course, if you're knocked unconscious as those casualties were in the Mackinaw Race were, all bets are off, though those two were not further endangered by their tethers.

Todd D
11-13-2011, 09:19 PM
I wear my mustang inflatable whenever I am outside the cabin on either boat. That means I wear whenever I am sailing on the sailboat and when I go onto the foredeck on the powerboat. On the powerboat I hang it from a hook when I am at the helm since my cockpit is totally enclosed. I have lines rigged for going forward on the powerboat, but just hang onto things on the sailboat.

David W Pratt
11-14-2011, 07:37 AM
My tethers are double ended with Gibb hooks on each end; a snap shackle attaches the tether to the harness/PFD and the tether is tied to it with a clove hitch, once you are situated, you can shorten the tether to hold you in position.