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View Full Version : Ok, I now have 220v in my garage - gotta put it to use



orbb
10-31-2011, 08:17 AM
For reasons that I will not explain, I now have a 220v receptacle in my garage, which is where I am working on my boat, and hopefully many boats in the future. So, there's gotta be some sort of 220v device I now need to buy.

I don't have room for a big table saw. With winter coming, I was thinking about a heater. Also, the family would appreciate some sort of dust collection system.

Any suggestions?

goodbasil
10-31-2011, 09:20 AM
Washer & dryer.

TerryLL
10-31-2011, 09:26 AM
Take a look at the motors on the machinery you have. Anything over 3/4 HP is likely to be rated 110/220, and can easily be converted to 220. The wiring diagram is generally right on the motor. They will run more efficiently at 220, so converting them is worth the effort.

Gotta have a decent bandsaw first and foremost.

wardd
10-31-2011, 09:27 AM
a knee milling machine

Paul Pless
10-31-2011, 09:35 AM
Washer & dryer.LOL iii

Paul Pless
10-31-2011, 09:36 AM
Gotta have a decent bandsaw first and foremost.In a small shop, not much reason to buy a 220V bandsaw.

orbb
10-31-2011, 10:00 AM
Washer & dryer.

That's what came to mind, along with an oven - that's why I posted here.

TerryLL
10-31-2011, 10:37 AM
In a small shop, not much reason to buy a 220V bandsaw.

The 14" Delta with either the 3/4 or 1 horse motor (110/220) are factory wired for 110 but will work better and run cooler when wired 220.

Iceboy
10-31-2011, 11:16 AM
Mig welder.

Paul Pless
10-31-2011, 11:42 AM
The 14" Delta with either the 3/4 or 1 horse motor (110/220) are factory wired for 110 but will work better and run cooler when wired 220.I have 1 HP Delta 14" bandsaw running on 110. How do I convert it to 220?

Bill R
10-31-2011, 12:04 PM
I have 1 HP Delta 14" bandsaw running on 110. How do I convert it to 220?

Look at the spec plate on the motor itself. IF the motor has the capability of running 220V, it will show the wiring diagram on the plate. Not all smaller motors like that are dual voltage.

Paul Pless
10-31-2011, 12:09 PM
Thank you Bill.

BBSebens
10-31-2011, 12:23 PM
It would seem to me that if you have a tool that causes the lights to dim a bit when you fire it up, it would be worth the effort to convert it to 220. Assuming, of course, the motor can take it.

Electric heat is a lousy way to heat a space, but its simple and it works. At least the with the higher voltage it will be more effective.

goodbasil
10-31-2011, 12:47 PM
Buy tools from foreign Craigslistings.

TerryLL
10-31-2011, 04:51 PM
I have 1 HP Delta 14" bandsaw running on 110. How do I convert it to 220?

My 14" Delta has a 1/2 HP motor that is 110 only. All my other stationary machinery is either 110/220 or 220 only. The motor plate will spell out the connections for 220 if the motor is already wired for it. You will also need a different plug, but you can use the same cord.

This is a 220 15-amp plug:

http://s7.cdn.hardwareandtools.net/is/image/HardwareandTools/785007237160?wid=120&hei=120

And a 220 15-amp socket:


http://www.justanswer.com/uploads/ElectricDoctor/2009-08-30_192959_15amp_220v_outlet.jpg
The current to the motor at 220 is 1/2 the current at 110, so you don't need a heavier cord, but the breaker may need to be changed out to the appropriate size.

Peter Malcolm Jardine
10-31-2011, 07:29 PM
You definitely need heat first... get on of these little fellows, and you can use the outlet for any 220V tool you buy in the future. These heaters use the outlet shown above, and are 4800 watt... easily enough to heat 600 square feet, and more efficient that a 110v heater. They are about 100 dollars

http://www.homedepot.ca/wcsstore/HomeDepotCanada/images/catalog/15329.DCH4831L_4.jpg

orbb
10-31-2011, 08:09 PM
You definitely need heat first... get on of these little fellows, and you can use the outlet for any 220V tool you buy in the future. These heaters use the outlet shown above, and are 4800 watt... easily enough to heat 600 square feet, and more efficient that a 110v heater. They are about 100 dollars

http://www.homedepot.ca/wcsstore/HomeDepotCanada/images/catalog/15329.DCH4831L_4.jpg


Manufacturer/brand name?

Peter Malcolm Jardine
10-31-2011, 08:15 PM
This one is really common... it's made by Dimplex. A heater like this is carried at TSC stores, Home Depot, etc. I heat about 700 sq feet with it, and I keep my shop heated year round. I rigged up a little platform to hang it from the ceiling about half way down the wall. It has a thermostat that seems to puke at about 3 years... I just buy a new heater. It gets a lot of use up here in the winter, so 30 bucks a year for a heater is no biggy.

oldsub86
10-31-2011, 10:17 PM
Be wary of what they refer to as "construction heaters" like the one in the photo. They tend to shoot out sparks when the element fails and light the shop on fire. They are intended to be temporary souces of heat and not permanent installations. There are slightly better units intended for full time use that are not much more expensive but less prone to causing fires.

I am no expert on this sort of thing but there was an article in our local newspaper last winter warning folks of what I noted above.

As to the 220V plug, there are lots of good uses. In my garage, I have a 220 V plug that I use for 1) my air compressor 2) my thickness planer 3) my Mig Welder 4) my stick welder 5) one of the construction heaters that I noted above

I can only use one of them at a time as I only have sufficient cable back to the panel in the house to manage 30 amps at 220V.

The welders can outdo that if I turn them up high. I have some new wire to install but it is a big job. I also need to upgrade the house to 200A from the current 100A in order to make it worthwhile.

In the basement, I have a 220V outlet that I use for the General dust collector.

Randy