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Dan McCosh
10-15-2011, 05:05 PM
Dunno if anyone else has a parrot, but I just heard a sound like my granddaughter coming into the driveway in the car, slamming the back door and running up the stairs. Then going back down. Didn't think much of it, but it wasn't her at all--it was the parrot looking at himself in the mirror in the bathroom. Is this common?

Arizona Bay
10-15-2011, 05:14 PM
LoL... Yes :D

I've lived with an African Grey for 22 Years..

I wonder if your parrot will repeat the sound. I've noticed that sometimes they do a one off sequence, and then use pieces of it, or re-arrange it.

He may really like your grandaughter :)

goodbasil
10-15-2011, 05:17 PM
I found an African Gray once, which doesn't answer your question.

The Bigfella
10-15-2011, 05:17 PM
What type of parrot have you got? We've had lorikeets for over 20 years... none in the aviary at present, but they nest in our yard anyhow and are tame

ChrisBen
10-15-2011, 08:24 PM
My roommate has 2 cockatiels, he brings the cage outside for the day and at night brings them back to his room. The cage sits in front of a big mirror and the male will sing to himself for an hour, the female isn't interested. It's a common thing for the cockatiels, wouldn't surprise me if it were common among other breeds.

ishmael
10-15-2011, 08:38 PM
He he. They can be amazing mimics.

I've never kept a large parrot, but a friend had an African Grey. A very personable creature, and an astounding mimic. Mostly little stuff like the sound of the toilet flushing, or someone coming home from work, etc. Kinda wiggy until you get used to it.

stevebla
10-15-2011, 08:43 PM
My neighbors have an African Gray Parrot, who makes amazing sounds, back up beeper of the trash trucks, cat meowing all kinds of crazy stuff.

ishmael
10-16-2011, 04:13 AM
Amusing story, and I can't remember where I read it. A guy is working maintenance at one of our national parks, and gets a complaint from the campers that a toilet is constantly flushing in one of the bath houses. He goes, checks the toilets, and can't find anything wrong. As he's walking away, a toilet flushes.

He goes back, looks again, nothing wrong. Again, as he's getting into his truck, a toilet flushes.

It turns out it was a raven in the trees who had taken a shine to that sound.

purri
10-16-2011, 04:38 AM
MW loves his parrots...

skuthorp
10-16-2011, 04:39 AM
We get 6 species in our place, including one obviously ex pet Sulphur Crested who touts for seed on the balcony rail and almost talks. A friend who is a zoologist says that escaped and freed talking pet cockatoos are in some places altering the 'vocabulary' of the wild flocks. They can live nearly 100 years I think and if the owner dies or cannot keep them they seem to join a flock easily enough. As a kid uncle Vic, a Boer and WW1 vet had one that swore in (reputedly) several languages, he sure could swear in english. After Vic died his cockatoo was freed and for some years you always knew when his flock passed overhead.

Spin_Drift
10-16-2011, 08:21 AM
Dunno if anyone else has a parrot, but I just heard a sound like my granddaughter coming into the driveway in the car, slamming the back door and running up the stairs. Then going back down. Didn't think much of it, but it wasn't her at all--it was the parrot looking at himself in the mirror in the bathroom. Is this common?

Too funny...lol.... He must be waiting for HER to come over. I don't think it's common. A lot of "pet" parrots don't talk.

We have a young Amazon Parrot who looks at his reflection singing and cooing to himself, but he doesn't talk. You're lucky that yours do.

:)

McMike
10-16-2011, 08:25 AM
We get 6 species in our place, including one obviously ex pet Sulphur Crested who touts for seed on the balcony rail and almost talks. A friend who is a zoologist says that escaped and freed talking pet cockatoos are in some places altering the 'vocabulary' of the wild flocks. They can live nearly 100 years I think and if the owner dies or cannot keep them they seem to join a flock easily enough. As a kid uncle Vic, a Boer and WW1 vet had one that swore in (reputedly) several languages, he sure could swear in english. After Vic died his cockatoo was freed and for some years you always knew when his flock passed overhead.

That's a great story!!!

Ian McColgin
10-16-2011, 08:39 AM
Among my friends with parrots that have annoying sounds:

One had a stainless steel kitchen sink. Long after she fixed the faucet drip, the parrot kept doing the hollow doink sound.

One parrot did that annoying sound the microwave makes when it's done.

Another does in random order the different rings of every phone in the house, including the custom rings for husband, daughter, etc.

Parrots seem to enjoy learning sounds. There's also some interesting research about how smart they can be, with some birds acquiring an impressive vocabulary and the syntactical ability to carry on a conversation. It's just hard, since they live so long, for them to get the consistent education and relationship that it takes.

George.
10-16-2011, 08:47 AM
Parrot lovers, please, DO NOT buy parrots except for the handful of species that are mass-bred in captivity. By buying, you drive up prices, and move an industry almost as large and hard to combat as the international drug trade.

Hundreds die for every wild parrot that makes it to be someone's "friend," condemned to live in a cage and never fly again. The typical way to capture a parrot is to chop down a nesting tree to get the nestlings. You can imagine what that does to wild populations and their habitats.

McMike
10-16-2011, 08:51 AM
Parrot lovers, please, DO NOT buy parrots except for the handful of species that are mass-bred in captivity. By buying, you drive up prices, and move an industry almost as large and hard to combat as the international drug trade.

Hundreds die for every wild parrot that makes it to be someone's "friend," condemned to live in a cage and never fly again. The typical way to capture a parrot is to chop down a nesting tree to get the nestlings. You can imagine what that does to wild populations and their habitats.

I wasn't going to say anything but now that you did; +1.

Paul Pless
10-16-2011, 09:10 AM
By buying, you drive up prices, and move an industry almost as large and hard to combat as the international drug trade.I have a hard time believing that the parrot industry approaches anything near the scope of the aprrox $600 Billion annual illicit drug trade, which account .893% of all global commerce.

George.
10-16-2011, 09:17 AM
Not only parrots. Illicit trade in wildlife as a whole, from parrots to rhino horn, which is worth more by weight than cocaine or gold.

Ian McColgin
10-16-2011, 09:31 AM
Regarding #16, the fact that the illicit drug trade is a great evil is not even the ghost of a reason to implicitly denigrate people who would protect habitat and wildlife by combating various illicit plant, animal, and bioproducts trades. The claim that combating one evil is so important that it excludes combating others is the pernicious twin to the notion that an evil is so huge that whatever you're doing about it is pointless anyway.

George's point is singularly important. Thank you.

Canoeyawl
10-16-2011, 09:53 AM
We have wild parrots here, it is great fun to hear them flying over sounding like a playground full of school children playing, laughing and yelling at each other.

Did anyone catch the PBS documentary of the Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill (http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/wildparrots/)?
It is a wonderful tale that brought a tear to my eye.

Spin_Drift
10-16-2011, 09:57 AM
Wow, that's amazing.

I'd like to know how to teach them talk. Two of my girl friends also have Amazons, none of ours talk.

ishmael
10-16-2011, 11:01 AM
There was a native parrot that lived in most Eastern parts of North America at the turn of 18th century, particularly our SE. It's said the flocks blackened the sun. It was hunted to extinction, largely to provide ornaments for lady's hats. It must have been good eating, too.

If I had my druthers, it would still be here. I support conservation of wildlife organizations with a little money now and then.

katey
10-16-2011, 11:05 AM
I have a neighborhood raven that sits in the top of the neighbor's tallest fir and mimics the goats. I keep looking twice.

George.
10-16-2011, 11:16 AM
From Wikipedia:


In 2002, the illegal wildlife trade was estimated it to be the second largest illegal trade, second only to the drugs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drugs) trade, with a value of at least (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C2%A3)10 billion.[8] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wildlife_trade#cite_note-vince2002-7) In 2008, it was estimated that it is worth at least US$ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/US$)5 billion, and may potentially total in excess of $20 billion annually. This ranks the illegal wildlife trade as among the most lucrative illicit economies in the world, behind illegal drugs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illegal_drug) and possibly human trafficking (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_trafficking) and arms trafficking (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arms_trafficking). Due to its clandestine nature, the illegal trade is difficult to quantify with any accuracy.

And the main culprits (besides the people at our end, of course) are:


China (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China) is the world’s largest importer of wildlife products, including an insatiable demand for turtles, ivory (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivory), tigers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiger), pangolins (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pangolin), and many other species used for food or medicine.[10] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wildlife_trade#cite_note-hance2009-9)


The USA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USA) is the second largest importer of wildlife products and a large destination for the illegal pet trade (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pet_trade).

BTW: I have seen countless poor people, and many illegal wildlife exploiters over my career. They are almost never the same person.

Arizona Bay
10-16-2011, 11:17 AM
Parrot lovers, please, DO NOT buy parrots except for the handful of species that are mass-bred in captivity. By buying, you drive up prices, and move an industry almost as large and hard to combat as the international drug trade.

Hundreds die for every wild parrot that makes it to be someone's "friend," condemned to live in a cage and never fly again. The typical way to capture a parrot is to chop down a nesting tree to get the nestlings. You can imagine what that does to wild populations and their habitats.

Y> I would go so far to say, don't buy parrots as pets. It really is like having a 2yr old child, that will never grow up, most people have no idea of the commitment. I was young and stupid when I got mine. I do the best I can for him, he is flighted, he gets lots of attention and a wide variety of food. But still....

Better to give your money and support to a Parrot refuge for abandoned birds.


That said, the past couple of days, he's started a new act. Normally when he's in walking mode (looking for trouble) he clucks like a chicken (we had chickens once, he used to crow occasionally). This time when I shood him away from the kitchen, he flew up to his rope swing and sat there. Short time later I heard bruk-bruk Hi! Bruk-bruk Hi! how areya?... maybe you had to be there:D

Today the word of chioce is; Why?

Dan McCosh
10-16-2011, 11:23 AM
Parrot lovers, please, DO NOT buy parrots except for the handful of species that are mass-bred in captivity. By buying, you drive up prices, and move an industry almost as large and hard to combat as the international drug trade.

Hundreds die for every wild parrot that makes it to be someone's "friend," condemned to live in a cage and never fly again. The typical way to capture a parrot is to chop down a nesting tree to get the nestlings. You can imagine what that does to wild populations and their habitats. Importing birds is controlled quote carefully, if only due to the concern about avian flu. Ours came from a local store that has bred tropical birds for several generations (her's, not the birds). The comparison to the drug trade is patently ridiculous.

S.V. Airlie
10-16-2011, 11:31 AM
I'm not sure whether this was a parrot or not. *In Oz it could have been, but it was a mimic and a good one. Lived near a munitions factory in Oz..Where I have no idea.The munitions factory had a warning whistle; three blasts on the horn, which told the workers that it would be a good idea to evacuate. This mimic learned the sequence and the pitch of this whistle and on occasion would let loose with the identical blasts on the horn. Each time it did this, the factory evacuated..Drove, I'm sure the owners nuts..Is this true? Well, I know parrots and the other mimics are quite capable of copying everything from a human voice to a car starting up, to train whistles. Wouldn't be surprised by this.

George.
10-16-2011, 11:34 AM
Dan, I once had a red-and-green macaw that I "rescued" from a market. I am not throwing any rocks here.

Bred locally? Fine. But don't delude yourself about imported birds. A common scam is to smuggle animals from Brazil to, say, Paraguay or Bolivia, where "legal" export documents can be procured for a reasonable price. Then they get shipped to the US to be retailed, "legally." All the US authorities check is the paperwork, even in the case of species that do not occur in the "country of origin."

Bruce Hooke
10-16-2011, 11:42 AM
Among my friends with parrots that have annoying sounds...

The "annoying sound" made by one parrot I met was the sound of the squeaky toy that belonged to the small, rather high-strung dog who lived in the same house. This did not bother his human companions overmuch but I had to wonder if it was one of the reasons the dog was rather high-strung!

McMike
10-16-2011, 11:46 AM
I have a neighborhood raven that sits in the top of the neighbor's tallest fir and mimics the goats. I keep looking twice.

No kidding? |;)


Seriously, thats gotta be cool to see and hear.

S.V. Airlie
10-16-2011, 11:50 AM
There was a native parrot that lived in most Eastern parts of North America at the turn of 18th century, particularly our SE. It's said the flocks blackened the sun. It was hunted to extinction, largely to provide ornaments for lady's hats. It must have been good eating, too.

If I had my druthers, it would still be here. I support conservation of wildlife organizations with a little money now and then.Passenger Pigeon Ish. Last one died in a zoo in I think 1914. Her name was Martha.
And as far as the cost of the illegal pet trade, I saw one figure of 6 Billion annually. Not all sold for pets either. And monitoring it is not as easy as one might think especially in the less developed countries.

ps..look at the python problem Fla. has now? It can be monitored to a point but getting rid of these species some figure is a lost battle. Controlled, not likely.

Dan McCosh
10-16-2011, 11:59 AM
Dan, I once had a red-and-green macaw that I "rescued" from a market. I am not throwing any rocks here.

Bred locally? Fine. But don't delude yourself about imported birds. A common scam is to smuggle animals from Brazil to, say, Paraguay or Bolivia, where "legal" export documents can be procured for a reasonable price. Then they get shipped to the US to be retailed, "legally." All the US authorities check is the paperwork, even in the case of species that do not occur in the "country of origin." I don't know how common this is, but to begin with, there is a very large price premium on hand-fed birds raised in captivity, for the simple reason that wild birds are, in fact wild, and the larger ones can be quite dangerous. I can't imagine much of a market for smuggled wild birds to begin with, let alone the effort, cost, etc., of shipping them any distance, not that someone isn't trying it.

skipper68
10-16-2011, 11:59 AM
I've never ha a parrot, but had a Cockatiel. He was WAY too funny! He had to have a sip or 2 of our coffee in the morning, and would throw a fit if we didn't let him shell and eat canned peas, when we had him. Went overboard once, and swam pretty good, while awaiting rescue. He spoke alot. When a boat would go flying by, he would run along the window ledge yelling "a$$hole!" He sang the "I'm Popeye the sailor man" song, and got the Captain in trouble, wolf whistling, when we were anchored on a boaters beach. He escaped one day when we were repairing the hatch. I found him a few days later, 10 miles away, from a classified add. I brought his cage, and tried getting him down from the power lines. It was definitely him. He wouldn't have none of THAT. Freedom was his world. I was told he probably flew south. As far as the comment about acting like a two year old, boy is that true! They know when their getting in trouble. They also throw the terrible 2's tantrums. To teach them to talk, they shouldn't have a companion, or mirror. It works best if you hand feed them,while baby chicks. I've heard females don't talk, only sing. Might be wrong. Have fun with him.. We still miss ours, after all these years.

S.V. Airlie
10-16-2011, 12:00 PM
And here is your parrot you brought up Ish..Please note the last paragraph specifically.

The Carolina Parakeet died out because of a number of different threats. To make space for more agricultural land, large areas of forest were cut down, taking away its habitat. The bird's colorful feathers (green body, yellow head, and red around the bill) were in demand as decorations in ladies' hats. The birds were also kept as pets and could be bred easily in captivity. However, little was done by owners to increase the population of tamed birds. Finally, they were killed in large numbers because farmers considered them a pest, although many farmers valued them for controlling invasive*cockleburs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cocklebur). It has also been hypothesized that the introduced*honeybee (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honeybee)*helped contribute to its extinction by taking many of the bird's nesting sites.[5] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carolina_Parakeet#cite_note-EllisNTB-5)
A factor that contributed to their extinction was the unfortunate flocking behavior that led them to return immediately to a location where some of the birds had just been killed. This led to even more being shot by hunters as they gathered about the wounded and dead members of the flock.
This combination of factors*extirpated (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Local_extinction)*the species from most of its range until the early years of the 20th century. However, the last populations were not much hunted for food or feathers, nor did the farmers in rural*Florida (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florida)*consider them a pest, as the benefit of the birds' love of cockleburs clearly outweighed the minor damage they did to the small-scale garden plots. The final extinction of the species is somewhat of a mystery, but the most likely cause seems to be that the birds succumbed to poultry disease, as suggested by the rapid disappearance of the last, small, but apparently healthy and reproducing flocks of these highly social birds. If this is true, the very fact that the Carolina Parakeet was finally tolerated to roam in the vicinity of human settlements proved its undoing.[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carolina_Parakeet#cite_note-Snyder-2)*The fact remains, however, that persecution significantly reduced the bird's population over many decades

Dan McCosh
10-16-2011, 12:09 PM
There are wild flocks of Quaker parrots in Chicago and Brooklyn, where they seem to adapt to the winter months by huddling over warm-air grates, like the homeless.

S.V. Airlie
10-16-2011, 12:10 PM
Dan..Same thing as Monk Parrots?

George.
10-16-2011, 12:44 PM
I can't imagine much of a market for smuggled wild birds to begin with, let alone the effort, cost, etc., of shipping them any distance, not that someone isn't trying it.

Yes, but it doesn't take much. Your typical endangered parrot from Brazil, for example, has a wild population of between 40 and 10,000 individuals, depending on the species. These are slow-breeding animals. For every one that reaches a pet owner abroad alive, maybe ten die in transit and another two during capture. If you remove even 1200 individuals from the population each year, to supply a global market that consumes "only" 100 or so... the math is relentless.

Anyway, if you like parrots, enjoy yours, and treat it kindly. If it is an endangered species, try to breed it, and if you didn't know about some problem with its provenance, don't feel guilty ex post facto, there is no point in it. I am just putting out a message to any who might read this thread, to get information before you get an undomesticated animal as a pet, and in the case of imported wildlife, to not rely on documentation. This is one of the hardest extinction forces to deal with on the ground, because perverse economics make wild animals and parts more valuable and persecuted as they become rarer and scarcer.

Dan McCosh
10-16-2011, 12:48 PM
Dan..Same thing as Monk Parrots? They seem to be, although I hadn't heard that name before. They are so prolific they are banned in several states.

S.V. Airlie
10-16-2011, 12:57 PM
Dan...

http://monkparakeet.com/jmsouth/intro.html

George.
10-16-2011, 01:00 PM
Monk parekeets come from the grasslands of southern Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Bolivia, and Paraguay. They do well in cattle pasture and cultivated lands, and as a result have become very prolific, at the expense of the other species whose habitat was converted to agriculture. They range well into the cold Pampas, and therefore do well in other temperate man-made landscapes as well.

S.V. Airlie
10-16-2011, 01:28 PM
Thanks George.

pefjr
10-16-2011, 08:45 PM
For all you bird lovers there is a special on Nature , or PBS channel tonight on the intelligence of Crows.

DerekW
10-17-2011, 05:07 PM
Trimming my fingernails with clippers the other day, the room suddenly developed an echo as each click of the clipper was perfectly mimicked by Katey the Quaker sitting atop her cage. She's nowhere near as clear spoken as some of the Greys I've been around, but she continually learns new vocabulary. Oddly enough she's not big on mimicking non-speech sounds, although she likes to whistle. Can't count yet, either; left to her own devices to sing "what shall we do with the drunken parrot" she'll sing the repeat lines over and over random numbers of times before moving on.

ishmael
10-18-2011, 09:42 AM
Jaimie, I'm aware of the tragedy of the NA passenger pigeon, but I'm just sure there was a native parrot in NA, the Carolina Parakeet? As I recall it was very numerous, and met the same fate as the passenger pigeon--ornamental feathers for lady's fancy hats and meat.

When Europeans first came here, both NA and SA, the abundance seemed limitless. George can speak to the ecology with more authourity than I can, but you don't need to shoot the last one to limit the viability of a species, you just have to shoot enough so they have a hard time finding a mate they like.

P.S. I wouldn't keep even a captive-bred large parrot as a pet.

S.V. Airlie
10-18-2011, 09:47 AM
Ish..I posted all the info on the demise of the Carolina Parrot I could find. Look for the link above..Well covered in the link and yes the demise of this species was in part due to its feathers but just only part..Not the entire reasons listed. Check it out.Post 33.

ishmael
10-18-2011, 09:54 AM
We cross posted, Jaimie. No harm no foul.

S.V. Airlie
10-18-2011, 09:56 AM
Yup...No reason to get our nickers in a twist over this. Just figured you had missed the info I posted..no biggie.:)

George.
10-18-2011, 10:40 AM
No need to get the last pair to drive a species to extinction. Once you get less than about 300 individuals, genetic diversity plummets and no further adaptation takes place. Eventually a disease or change in conditions kills it off.

The Carolina parekeet was a social species, which are even easier to wipe out. The species I am working on right now, the giant otter - I will be in the bush with them for the next couple of weeks, so you all will get a break from me :D - lives in groups with a single breeding pair, which cannot raise yound successfully without several helpers. There are maybe a few thousand otters left, but that means there may be less than 500 breeding pairs, which is pretty much the brink of extinction in the long run. In cases like this, we cannot afford to lose any at all.

ChrisBen
10-18-2011, 10:42 AM
No need to get the last pair to drive a species to extinction. Once you get less than about 300 individuals, genetic diversity plummets and no further adaptation takes place. Eventually a disease or change in conditions kills it off.

The Carolina parekeet was a social species, which are even easier to wipe out. The species I am working on right now, the giant otter - I will be in the bush with them for the next couple of weeks, so you all will get a break from me :D - lives in groups with a single breeding pair, which cannot raise yound successfully without several helpers. There are maybe a few thousand otters left, but that means there may be less than 500 breeding pairs, which is pretty much the brink of extinction in the long run. In cases like this, we cannot afford to lose any at all.I hope you're gonna take pics to share when you get back.

S.V. Airlie
10-18-2011, 10:47 AM
George you are right.

Look at those species even here that have numbers less than 300. Mostly birds obviously. Genetics and naturally occurring diasters can wipe out the entire population.
Whooping Crane
NeNe
Ivory Billed Woodpecker..not seen for years and probably extinct
California Condor, partly perhaps because of breeding one time every two years.
Cheetah..don't know the numbers there.Close genetic ties though are noted in them...
Right Whales..about what 300 hundred.

This is just off the top of my head..Lots of populations are out there numbering less than 500 I'm sure.
and all are basically extinct for all intents and purposes.*

If someone wants a case close to many breeders' heart, think Hip Dysplasia in dogs such as German Shephards, Newfies, St. Bernards, Gold Retrievers etc.

George.
10-18-2011, 11:04 AM
Yes... A lot of species we think we "saved" after having persecuted them to the brink of extinction will become extinct in the long run. The damage we do to our world often takes a long time to manifest its effects.

S.V. Airlie
10-18-2011, 11:26 AM
George..I know I've asked this before..What is their typical range? What ID system are you using..? Collars?

George.
10-18-2011, 05:07 PM
We ID the giant otters by filming their throat markings, which are like fingerprints - unique to individuals.

When you approach a group of otters by canoe they come up and "periscope" - stick their head high out of the water and display their throat and chest. It is an otter's way of saying "this is who I am - who are you, and what are you doing in my territory?" That makes it easy for us. Of course, you have to be dealing with otters who are not afraid of people. We are lucky to be working in one of the few really protected areas in the entire Amazon, and our otters are as tame as they come.

Home range? Godd question. It varies immensely by site. It is published that they require thousands and thousands of hectares, but we are dealing with an unusually dense population. This year, we have seventeen otters in three differnt groups in a single oxbow lake, maybe 200 hectares of water. But this is unprecedented and so far unpublished.

S.V. Airlie
10-18-2011, 05:12 PM
Just curious.. Skin marking are good indicators for many species. I guess I was thinking about telemetry there to determine range and density. A bit of a 2 for, in a way. I should PM you with questions. Not my forte but....Don't want to bother you that much...

George.
10-18-2011, 05:51 PM
Nah, ask questions here. Who knows who might care.

Three years ago, in the park where we work, another researcher fitted radio transmitters to giant otters for the forst time. Since they dive through the flooded forest for fish and csn getbentangled, the transmitter is implanted surgically, with just the antenna showing.

Results: otter one, a male, could only be detected by radio when it was also visible - rather useless.

Otter two died in surgey. It was a female. Then they noticed she was lactating. They went back to the den and found two dead cubs.

Now, ask me what i think of intrusive research on endangered species

ishmael
10-18-2011, 06:37 PM
It sounds like interesting work, George. So analyze what went wrong, and maybe try again.

I think we agree that protecting the habitat is vitally important, and not so easy sometimes. If you cut down the forest, or pollute the water where this critter lives, the game is lost.

Suddenly, we aren't talking basic research, but rather a lot of politics.

You're an articulate man, maybe consider taking that on. It's a shift, and I don't know the politics of the Brazilan rainforest an iota.

shade of knucklehead
10-18-2011, 08:34 PM
We have a blue fronted amazon, and she laughs exactly like my son, mimics a crow that used to be outside our old house, meows like one of our cats, catcalls, does the telephone, answers the telephone, says "hello lola" (her name), does tons of different whistles, says "what's that" whenever I get sliced cheese out of the fridge(her favorite snack)

the only irritating thing she does is she will scream if I come home from work and totally ignore her. As long as I open the door to the sun room and say hello or whistle she is fine, but if I come in tired from work and figure I will rest a bit in my chair first she will start off squawking kind of quietly and build in volume until you can't even think.

Oh, you know the noise you can make with your mouth that kind of sounds like water dropping? She does that also.