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s1120
09-03-2011, 05:38 AM
Ive been doing a lot of reading the last year or so, and getting ready for my next book... Started out with Mark twains "Following the equator" then move on to "Life on the mississippi" Bolth great books, and I rely enjoy his humor. Right now Im Reading Slocums "sailing alone around the world" Also a good book. So now Im looking for a next book. We all know boat guys know the best books so here I am. :D Any good reads out there?

seanz
09-03-2011, 05:47 AM
The Venturesome Voyages of Captain Voss.

Should fit well with the Slocum, did when I read it.

s1120
09-03-2011, 06:04 AM
Thanks I will look into that.

I picked up this book, and read it about 10 years ago... http://www.amazon.com/Small-Craft-Advisory-About-Building/dp/0871135337 I might dig that out and reread it also.

Paul Pless
09-03-2011, 06:20 AM
A Speck on the Sea: Epic Voyages in the Most Improbable VesselsBy William H. Longyard

TerryLL
09-03-2011, 08:15 AM
You'll eventually have to tackle Patrick O'Brian. Twenty volumes of life aboard a man-of-war in Nelson's navy.

John Smith
09-03-2011, 08:21 AM
If you like Mark Twain, he wrote other books.

Kind of depends what you're looking for: Mysteries range from Sherlock Holmes collection through Mike Hammer.

I'd suggest my book, "Memoirs of a Sleepless Mind", but that would be tasteless.

Also depends if you're using your library or buying the book. If you're using the library, take a chance. If you don't like the book, you've lost nothing but a little time.

Tylerdurden
09-03-2011, 08:23 AM
The Creature from Jekyll Island

Paul Pless
09-03-2011, 08:28 AM
You'll eventually have to tackle Patrick O'Brian. Twenty volumes of life aboard a man-of-war in Nelson's navy.unreadable drivel

Bruce Hooke
09-03-2011, 08:32 AM
Tent Life in Siberia is an interesting read about an attempt to connect North America to Europe via a telegraph line laid across Siberia. This was in the time when they had not yet succeeded at laying an undersea cable across the Atlantic Ocean.

Jim Mahan
09-03-2011, 09:05 AM
First you have to row a little boat, Richard Bode. Excellent little book, more about sailing than rowing, and as much about life as boating. Very inspiring.

TerryLL
09-03-2011, 09:26 AM
unreadable drivel

Yet another erudite review from the NASCAR contingent.

Rich Jones
09-03-2011, 09:36 AM
unreadable drivel

Heresy!! O'Brian's novels are some of the finest literature in the world. Of course, we've been through all this before.

Keith Wilson
09-03-2011, 10:01 AM
unreadable drivelOh, my. No one is required to like O'Brian's books, but this has to be the single most ridiculous thing Paul has ever said here.

If you like real-life adventures, I'd suggest The True History of the Conquest of New Spain by Bernal Diaz del Castillo (http://www.amazon.com/Conquest-New-Spain-Penguin-Classics/dp/0140441239). It's a memoir written by a crusty old guy who was something like a sergeant with Cortez when they conquered Tenochtitlan and the Aztec empire in 1521. He was irritated by the propaganda in the official histories, and wanted to set the record straight. His personality is one of the better things about the book; he was a grumpy uneducated old soldier who by God was determined to tell the unvarnished truth as he saw it, and he saw some of the most astounding things any man has ever seen.

I like the Penguin edition, because they edit out some of the more tiresome rants about the lying official historians and how they got it all wrong.

Gerarddm
09-03-2011, 10:20 AM
Dreadnought, Robert K. Massie. Incredibly fascinating, from stem to stern. Pair it up with its sequel Castles of Steel, which is gripping, especially about Jutland.

TomF
09-03-2011, 10:45 AM
My 2 suggestions are free on the internet - the links take you to the specific Gutenberg download sites.

Jerome K. Jerome's Three Men in a Boat (http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/308) is not to be missed if you've any taste for late 19th century humour. If your taste runs to less froth, George Eliot's Middlemarch (http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/145)is on my annual reading list.

David W Pratt
09-03-2011, 11:04 AM
Faulkner, The Reavers, The Snopes Trilogy (pretty much the apex of American Literature)
The Cruise of the Snark by Jack London, very funny.
N by E by Rockwell Kent, a cruise from Long Island Sound to Greenland, a sinking, salvage, sex with eskimos, and illustrated by the author who at the time was pretty much the foremost American Illustrator
On the Road by another Horace Mann graduate, Jack Kerouac
Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers
Shadow in the Sands by Sam Llewellyn
Have fun.

CWSmith
09-03-2011, 11:40 AM
Hunting the Desert Whale by Erle Stanley Gardner. He's the writer of Perry Mason, but it isn't fiction. It's about his trip down the Baha years (decades) ago. A great adventure read.

pefjr
09-03-2011, 01:30 PM
Ive been doing a lot of reading the last year or so, and getting ready for my next book... Started out with Mark twains "Following the equator" then move on to "Life on the mississippi" Bolth great books, and I rely enjoy his humor. Right now Im Reading Slocums "sailing alone around the world" Also a good book. So now Im looking for a next book. We all know boat guys know the best books so here I am. :D Any good reads out there?In that vien, there's hundreds: 'Roughing it', if you like Twain. Slocum's is hard to beat but a couple more modern sailing adventures I enjoyed were, Dove, Maiden Voyage, and a father and son adventure http://www.amazon.com/My-Old-Man-Sea-Father/dp/1565121023/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1315075189&sr=8-2

PhaseLockedLoop
09-03-2011, 01:40 PM
Try one of H.W. (Bill) Tilman sailing/mountaineering books. Crusty old bastard, but often pretty funny, and tough as epoxy.

---on second thought, he was 'way younger than I when he did that stuff. So I'm the crusty old bastard--but nowhere near as tough as he.

Curtism
09-03-2011, 01:50 PM
Life of Pi by Yann Martel was interesting.


The son of a zookeeper, Pi Patel has an encyclopedic knowledge of animal behavior and a fervent love of stories. When Pi is sixteen, his family emigrates from India to North America aboard a Japanese cargo ship, along with their zoo animals bound for new homes.

The ship sinks. Pi finds himself alone in a lifeboat, his only companions a hyena, an orangutan, a wounded zebra, and Richard Parker, a 450-pound Bengal tiger. Soon the tiger has dispatched all but Pi, whose fear, knowledge, and cunning allow him to coexist with Richard Parker for 227 days while lost at sea.

AndyG
09-03-2011, 02:35 PM
Dreadnought, Robert K. Massie. Incredibly fascinating, from stem to stern. Pair it up with its sequel Castles of Steel, which is gripping, especially about Jutland.

Excellent books, both. I'd have to follow up those nominations with The Rules of the Game by Andrew Gordon. This book does a great job of explaining how the RN became too rules-bound in the late-Victorian/new battleship era, and how this played out (badly, for the UK) during WW1. It's a much more entertaining read than it might sound from my description!

...It's also a great warning against following proscriptive rules in any structured organisation/enterprise.

Andy

Durnik
09-03-2011, 03:11 PM
well, for light reading, there's The Boy, Me, and the Cat (http://www.narrativepress.com/profile.php?book_id=1-58976-226-6) and for a bit more meat (think Patrick O'Brian lite.. ;-)), there's Two Years Before The Mast (http://www.narrativepress.com/profile.php?book_id=1-58976-102-2)..
also on Gutenburg (http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/search.html/?format=html&default_prefix=all&sort_order=&query=Two+Years+Before+The+Mast)..
enjoy
bobby

Jim Mahan
09-03-2011, 03:43 PM
"Life of Pi by Yann Martel was interesting."
+2 Fascinating yarn with a great ending.

Spin_Drift
09-03-2011, 04:21 PM
Adrift: Seventy-Six Days Lost at Sea
by Steven Callahan.

An amazing story of survival and ingenuity. I highly recommend it to everyone involved with boats. I read it before embarking on a 2500 mile journey on our boat.

After his small sailboat sank in the Atlantic, Steve Callahan spent 76 days in a five-foot inflatable raft, drifting 1800 miles before his rescue.

.

Paul Pless
09-03-2011, 05:18 PM
The Big Roads: The Untold Story of the Engineers, Visionaries, and Trailblazers Who Created the American Superhighways by Earl Swift

I listened to an interview with the author on NPR yesterday. It sounded like a fascinating read. It's on my list now.

DougIt was a cool interview.

blindbrook
09-03-2011, 06:13 PM
If you like humor, go with Farley Mowat's "The Boat Who Wouldn't Float"

Spin_Drift
09-03-2011, 06:29 PM
Wow, what a great list of stories. Will give us all nice reading for the long winter nights. :):D

Here is another interesting one

The Last Shot: The Incredible Story of the C.S.S. Shenandoah and the True Conclusion of the American Civil War.

From Publishers Weekly
A longtime Alaskan has given us this impressive history of the last Confederate commerce raider, which fired its last shot at a Yankee whaler north of the Aleutian Islands two and a half months after Appomattox. It begins with the ship leaving England under the name Sea King, then meeting a chartered cargo ship at Madeira and loading guns and other warlike gearówithout more than a fraction of the crew needed to use them. A gifted seaman if more than a little irascible, Capt. James Waddell recruited his crew as he sailed. After an eventful stop in Melbourne, Australia, the ship sailed north to the Arctic whaling grounds, ravaged the whaling fleet and was proceeding to attack the California gold ships when Waddell learned that the war was overówhereupon he set off to deliver his ship and crew to the British by sailing 23,000 storm-tossed miles back to Liverpool without sighting land. Researched heavily from primary sources, filled with vivid personality portraits and almost miraculously accessible to readers without a background in maritime history, this is an absolutely irresistible sea story. The seafaring audience is likely to be as strong as or stronger than the Civil War audience for this book, and the combination may really set it afloat.

Keith Wilson
09-03-2011, 06:50 PM
For those fond of Jerome's Three Men In a Boat, I highly recommend To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis. (http://www.amazon.com/Say-Nothing-Dog-Connie-Willis/dp/0553575384) I'm fond of time travel stories, and this is one of the very best. It's also just about as funny as the original in places.

purri
09-03-2011, 07:28 PM
Patrick White's "Voss"

Carter's "The Road to Botany Bay"

TANSTAF1
09-03-2011, 07:34 PM
The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey

Publisher's weekly:

In a gripping account, Millard focuses on an episode in Teddy Roosevelt's search for adventure that nearly came to a disastrous end. A year after Roosevelt lost a third-party bid for the White House in 1912, he decided to chase away his blues by accepting an invitation for a South American trip that quickly evolved into an ill-prepared journey down an unexplored tributary of the Amazon known as the River of Doubt. The small group, including T.R.'s son Kermit, was hampered by the failure to pack enough supplies and the absence of canoes sturdy enough for the river's rapids. An injury Roosevelt sustained became infected with flesh-eating bacteria and left the ex-president so weak that, at his lowest moment, he told Kermit to leave him to die in the rainforest. Millard, a former staff writer for National Geographic, nails the suspense element of this story perfectly, but equally important to her success is the marvelous amount of detail she provides on the wildlife that Roosevelt and his fellow explorers encountered on their journey, as well as the cannibalistic indigenous tribe that stalked them much of the way.

Cuyahoga Chuck
09-03-2011, 08:24 PM
"Wilbur and Orville" by Frank Howard. You think you know their story but you probably know only 10% of it.

s1120
09-04-2011, 06:05 AM
Lots of AWESOME ideas guys!!! Keep them coming!

TANSTAF1
09-04-2011, 07:13 AM
Are you looking for sailing connected books, or just good reads? Fictional or just narrative?

ron ll
09-04-2011, 10:00 AM
Anything by Arturo Perez-Reverte, don't miss him.

And my favorite recent book, "The Breaking of Eggs" about a communist living in Paris and having to re-examine his life after the fall of the Berlin Wall.

rbgarr
09-04-2011, 10:24 AM
Nautical nonfiction:
Cod
Defining the Wind
Longitude

Nautical fiction:
Trustee From The Toolroom

Naughty fiction:
'Vox' by Nicholas Baker. I challenge you to put it down. It's short, inventive, absorbing fiction with a substantial erotic bent. (A GREAT bedtime read for two!)

stevebla
09-04-2011, 12:39 PM
The Open Boat
Short story Stephen Crane

"None of them knew the color of the sky. Their eyes glanced level, and were fastened upon the waves that swept toward them. These waves were of the hue of slate, save for the tops, which were of foaming white, and all of the men knew the colors of the sea. The horizon narrowed and widened, and dipped and rose, and at all times its edge was jagged with waves that seemed thrust up in points like rocks. Many a man ought to have a bath-tub larger than the boat which here rode upon the sea. These waves were most wrongfully and barbarously abrupt and tall, and each froth-top was a problem in small-boat navigation."

pumpkin
09-04-2011, 01:19 PM
Shamless self promotion.

Tom's Adventures in Alaska : Book 1-Note in a Bottle and Book 2-The Bear Claw are availible on Kindle and Nook.

They are fishing and adventure stories set in Alaska.

David G
09-04-2011, 01:26 PM
Oh, my. No one is required to like O'Brian's books, but this has to be the single most ridiculous thing Paul has ever said here.

If you like real-life adventures, I'd suggest The True History of the Conquest of New Spain by Bernal Diaz del Castillo (http://www.amazon.com/Conquest-New-Spain-Penguin-Classics/dp/0140441239). It's a memoir written by a crusty old guy who was something like a sergeant with Cortez when they conquered Tenochtitlan and the Aztec empire in 1521. He was irritated by the propaganda in the official histories, and wanted to set the record straight. His personality is one of the better things about the book; he was a grumpy uneducated old soldier who by God was determined to tell the unvarnished truth as he saw it, and he saw some of the most astounding things any man has ever seen.

I like the Penguin edition, because they edit out some of the more tiresome rants about the lying official historians and how they got it all wrong.

I don't know if this is the same book. Same author.

The discovery and conquest of Mexico, 1517-1521 (https://catalog.multcolib.org/search%7ES1?/adiaz+del+castillo+bernal+1496+1584/adiaz+del+castillo+bernal+1496+1584/1%2C1%2C19%2CC/frameset&FF=adiaz+del+castillo+bernal+1496+1584&7%2C%2C19)

I've ordered it... so hopefully it's the one you liked.

Keith Wilson
09-04-2011, 01:34 PM
That's it. It's the only thing he wrote. He's not really a good writer as such, but the fact that he was there is enough.

David G
09-04-2011, 01:38 PM
Rowing to Latitude by Fredston

Maybe something from Sam McKinney: Bligh - a true account of mutiny...; Sailing with Vancouver; Reach of Tide, Ring of History.

Or... perhaps one of Robin Cody's: Voyage of a Summer Sun, canoeing the Columbia river; Ricochet River.

Mrleft8
09-04-2011, 03:52 PM
unreadable drivel Just because you can't read, doesn't make it drivel.

Not books about sailing, or boats, but... South of Main By Pat Conroy (Prince of Tides, among others) is very good.
Walking to Gatlinburg By Howard Frank Mosher (Stranger in the Kingdom, among others) is superb.
The Farmer's Daughter By Jim Harrison (The Woman Lit by Fireflies among others) is outstanding.

ron ll
09-04-2011, 11:49 PM
Of course you realize the price for our advice is that you have to provide us with a book report on the one you choose.

johnw
09-05-2011, 12:11 AM
The Prize of all the Oceans (http://www.amazon.com/Prize-All-Oceans-Ansons-Voyage/dp/0670891975), which is about Anson's voyage around the world during the War of Jenkins' Ear, is a great book about some important history few people know about. Over the Edge of the World: Magellan's Terrifying Circumnavigation of the Globe (http://www.amazon.com/Over-Edge-World-Terrifying-Circumnavigation/dp/006093638X/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1315199477&sr=1-4) will teach you a lot about history you think you know. The Floating Brothel (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=the+floating+brothel&x=10&y=21), which is about the first group of female prisoners transported to Australia, told me a lot about the conditions that produced enough criminals to settle a continent. By the way, the reason they were being transported to Australia was the American Revolution -- England couldn't send all their criminals to the American colonies. And finally, a non-nautical pair of histories, The Thieves' Opera (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=the+floating+brothel&x=10&y=21#/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=the+thieves%27+opera&rh=n%3A283155%2Ck%3Athe+thieves%27+opera), which is about the underworld of London in the time of Jonathan Wild, the man who inspired The Beggars' Opera and was the basis for the character Fagin in Dickens' work, and Craze: Gin and Debauchery in the Age of Reason (http://www.amazon.com/Craze-Gin-Debauchery-Age-Reason/dp/1568582315/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1315199975&sr=1-2), about what happened when the common man could afford to get drunk as a lord on a regular basis.

Woxbox
09-05-2011, 08:06 PM
Melville's "White Jacket" (http://www.amazon.com/White-Jacket-World-Man--ebook/dp/B004UKF498/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1315271751&sr=8-2) is often overlooked. A fascinating view of life aboard an American man-of-war. All sorts of stuff you never hear of in the novels.

Kevin T
09-07-2011, 11:56 AM
3 recent faves:
"Pillars of the Earth" by Ken Follett
"World Without End" also by Follett
"At Home" by Bill Bryson

The first two should really be read in the order above in as much as two isn't a sequel per se, but some of the characters from the first are referenced in the second. Great stories about England in the middle ages and Cathedral building. Sounds dry, but everyone I know that has ever read them called them page turners. If you have a Kindle, go that route if you can, as they are huge 900 plus page monsters.

Bryson's book, he of "A Walk in the Woods" fame is a nice account of how the modern home came about, also sounds "dry" in the describing, but he has a wonderful facility with language and the printed word.

TANSTAF1
09-07-2011, 12:06 PM
Kevein T: You are not permitted to like "Pillars of the Earth" I had read Lie down with Lions and a few other Follet ones, but after Pillars of the Earth, I bought or kindled every one of his I could. I even bought the DVD (although I confess i have not watched it yet.

Antyway besides any Follet, here are some:

An Army at Dawn by Ken Atkinson

Publisher's Weekly:


Atkinson won a Pulitzer Prize during his time as a journalist and editor at the Washington Post and is the author of The Long Gray Line: The American Journey of West Point's Class of 1966 and of Crusade: The Untold Story of the Persian Gulf War. In contrast to Crusade's illustrations of technomastery, this book depicts the U.S. Army's introduction to modern war. The Tunisian campaign, Atkinson shows, was undertaken by an American army lacking in training and experience alongside a British army whose primary experience had been of defeat. Green units panicked, abandoning wounded and weapons. Clashes between and within the Allies seemed at times to overshadow the battles with the Axis. Atkinson's most telling example is the relationship of II Corps commander George Patton and his subordinate, 1st Armored Division's Orlando Ward. The latter was a decent person and capable enough commander, but he lacked the final spark of ruthlessness that takes a division forward in the face of heavy casualties and high obstacles. With Dwight Eisenhower's approval, Patton fired him. The result was what Josef Goebbels called a "second Stalingrad"; after Tunisia, the tide of war rolled one way: toward Berlin. Atkinson's visceral sympathies lie with Ward; his subtext from earlier books remains unaltered: in war, they send for the hard men. Despite diction that occasionally lapses into the melodramatic, general readers and specialists alike will find worthwhile fare in this intellectually convincing and emotionally compelling narrative.

Also, the three books in the Stief Larson trilogy:

The Girl with the Dragon Tatoo
The Girl Who Played with Fire
The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest

ron ll
09-07-2011, 12:51 PM
Pillars of the Earth was my favorite book for a long time, (it's way different than other Follett novels, so don't judge it by that). But I bought World Without End when it first came out and just couldn't get started in it. Maybe I should try it again.

Kevin T
09-07-2011, 01:05 PM
Ron II, I would agree that World Without End didn't kick in from page one, but around page 35 or so, I couldn't put it down, definitely give it another shot.

TAN, I am assuming you are talking about the "Pillars of the Earth DVD of the STARZ 8 or 10 part mini-series. I saw it and thought it not bad, ambitious like only an 1100 plus page book turned into a film adaptation can be, but overall pretty good and for the most part the casting was pretty good although a puffy and somewhat short Rufus Sewel as "Tom Builder" seemed a stretch. I always pictured a tall gaunt fellow, perhaps a 15 to 20 year or so younger James Cromwell in the role. Had they made the series shortly after the book came out in 1989, he would have been perfect.

If you haven't read Eye of the Needle, by all means do, it was tremendously better then the movie with Donald Sutherland who coincidentally was also briefly in Pillars of the Earth.

TANSTAF1
09-07-2011, 01:06 PM
IMHO, Pillars is better, but World Without End is also good. I never read much based in the era and did not think I would find it interesting. I think I picked it up only because i like some of Follet's other writing and I found myself fascinated - so much so that I then got everything by him that I could find. It's curious that Kevin T likes ti also.

Kevin T
09-07-2011, 01:07 PM
IMHO, Pillars is better, but World Without End is also good. I never read much based in the era and did not think I would find it interesting. I think I picked it up only because i like some of Follet's other writing and I found myself fascinated - so much so that I then got everything by him that I could find. It's curious that Kevin T likes ti also.

Just asking, but why do you find that curious?

TANSTAF1
09-07-2011, 01:20 PM
Yes, I am referring to the mini-series DVD. I think I took it with me to watch and then I noticed it was Blu-Ray and didn't have a player with me and set it aside. I think I picture Tom the Builder the same as you. Oh well, movies are rarely as good as the book which is why I don't watch many and zero TV.

I read Eye of the Needle seemingly decades ago. I'll have to dig it out of the attic and reread it -when you get to my age and have read so many books, they become just a blur. Sometimes I'll be reading one and get a quarter of the way through and realize I had read it before. :d I never saw the movie.

Having recently read many Follet books I can say that they do vary a lot, but they are all excellent.

kingplanker
09-07-2011, 01:36 PM
If you like humor, go with Farley Mowat's "The Boat Who Wouldn't Float"

I agree completely with the above.

I also thoroughly enjoyed "Wanderer" an autobiography by Sterling Hayden (1963). Acting was a sideline for him - he was at heart a true mariner. I found a hardcover copy at a marine consignment store.

From Wikipedia:
Hayden was a genuine adventurer and man of action, not dissimilar from many of his movie parts. He dropped out of high school at the age of 16 and took a job as mate on a schooner.[5] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sterling_Hayden#cite_note-nytobit-4) His first voyage was to Newport Beach (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newport_Beach), California from New London, Connecticut (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_London,_Connecticut).[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sterling_Hayden#cite_note-blade-3) Later, he was a fisherman on the Grand Banks (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Banks) of Newfoundland, ran a charter yacht, and served as a fireman on eleven trips to Cuba aboard a steamer.[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sterling_Hayden#cite_note-blade-3) He skippered (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skipper_%28boating%29) a trading schooner in the Caribbean after earning his master's license, and in 1937 he served as mate on a world cruise of the schooner Yankee.[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sterling_Hayden#cite_note-blade-3) After serving as sailor and fireman on larger vessels (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merchant_ship) and sailing around the world several times, he was awarded his first command aged 22, skippering a square rigger (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Square_rigger) from Gloucester, Massachusetts, to Tahiti in 1938.[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sterling_Hayden#cite_note-blade-3)[6] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sterling_Hayden#cite_note-wanderer225-5)

TANSTAF1
09-07-2011, 01:48 PM
Here's another especially for anyone from Maine:

The Lobster Coast: Rebels, Rusticators, and the Struggle for a Forgotten Frontier
by Colin Woodard


In this lucid cultural history of Maine, journalist Woodard tells the story of the rugged people who inhabit the state's coastal fishing communities, beginning with the Scotch-Irish, Germans and migrants from southern New England who from the early 17th to the early 19th centuries struggled to make a living in an inhospitable environment while trying to fend off Indians, religious zealots, wealthy Bostonian land grabbers and "rusticators" (vacationers who spawned unwanted development). Maine's economy prospered for a while after it seceded from Massachusetts and became a state in 1820, but between 1860 and 1900 everything collapsed except for lobstering, which the fishermen managed to protect with effective conservation practices. Lobsters became, and remain, the basis of the state's fishing industry. The author was born and raised in Maine, and well understands the pride, independence and ability to work together for the good of the community-(traditions derived from the early settlers, he says), which helped the fishermen preserve a resource that is essential to their livelihood. But, he points out, other factors are now at play, for the state is being overrun by suburbanites who don't understand or respect this tradition. Woodard tries to maintain hope that the old spirit of independence will save the state's distinctive character, but he can't help ending on a discouraging note, wondering whether Maine will soon be just one more suburb in the great East Coast megalopolis. Woodard (Ocean's End) covers a lot of ground in his informative book, and he never fails to make the story engaging. Maps not seen by PW.

I'm from Maine but I learned a lot. Even before someone posted the live web cam of a lobster trap showing the lobsters coming and going I read that they did that in this book. I always thought that once they enterred they could not (easily) get out. But there is a lot about fishing boats in this book also.

Gerarddm
09-07-2011, 02:03 PM
[QUOTE=johnw;3114788]The Prize of all the Oceans (http://www.amazon.com/Prize-All-Oceans-Ansons-Voyage/dp/0670891975), which is about Anson's voyage around the world during the War of Jenkins' Ear, is a great book about some important history few people know about. QUOTE]

This is a very fine non-fiction book. For a wonderful fictitional treatment of the same voyage, I heartily recommend Patrick O'Brian's The Golden Ocean.

Anson and crew were tough hombres.

johnw
09-07-2011, 02:23 PM
Anson and crew were tough hombres.

And yet, very few survived. More than made it through Magellan's voyage, though. Anson's success eventually made him First Lord of the Admiralty, and he instituted the reforms that helped make the English Navy such a dominant force. A man like James Cook, who entered the Naval Service with no contacts, could never have advanced to the rank of captain without those reforms.

WX
09-07-2011, 04:26 PM
Robert Fitzroy, capt of the Beagle and the first person to link barometric pressure to weather patterns, not to mention the inventor of weather forcasting. The book is a very good read.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fitzroy-Remarkable-Darwins-Invention-Forecast/dp/0755311817