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Ray Hurley
08-30-2011, 05:14 PM
I'm looking for a small jointer and would like some opinions/recommendations. About 25 years ago I had a 4" Rockwell jointer that fit my needs; however, I had to sell it and other tools as I moved from a house to a small apartment. Thanks.

JimConlin
08-30-2011, 05:30 PM
There are a couple listed on Ebay now.

Ray Hurley
08-31-2011, 10:40 AM
There are a couple listed on Ebay now.

Could only fine one on Ebay which required pick-up in MI. I'm not particularily looking for an old 4" Rockwell jointer, but something compartible, possibly new. Naturally, I would not walk away from a 4" Rockwell in good condition.

Canoeyawl
08-31-2011, 11:22 AM
There are always about a half dozen good ones to choose from every day on the local Craigslist.
Assuming space is the reason you want a 4" model, I would probably look at a "small" 6" model, they take up about the same floor space.

Don't be hasty, there are full size Powermatics for less than $500.
The 4" stuff is about $100-150.

Nicholas Carey
08-31-2011, 03:17 PM
Search the Tampa Bay Craig's List for jointers: http://tampa.craigslist.org/search/tls?query=(joiner|jointer)+-biscuit+-plate&srchType=A

Here's a 6-inch Rockwell for $175 in Tarpon Springs -- looks to be 70s vintage from the spaceship/peace sign Rockwell Int'l logo. I bet you could bargain down the price a bit:

http://tampa.craigslist.org/pnl/tls/2516155383.html

ILikeRust
08-31-2011, 04:03 PM
Second the suggestion to watch Craig's list. I see old Rockwell and Delta 4" and 6" jointers on my local CL all the time.

Paul Pless
08-31-2011, 04:26 PM
Ought to be able to find a decent #7 for less than $50.00.

http://www.planethart.com/tools/images/stanley7-4.jpg

:D

Peter Malcolm Jardine
08-31-2011, 08:57 PM
Too bad you're so far away Ray, I have a 6 inch Boice Crane on a stand with motor I would part with for $75

ILikeRust
08-31-2011, 09:13 PM
Ought to be able to find a decent #7 for less than $50.00.

http://www.planethart.com/tools/images/stanley7-4.jpg

:D

I've got a couple #7s and a #8 (which is one of my favorite users), but sometimes, it just makes sense to use the machine rather than do it by hand...

http://i648.photobucket.com/albums/uu207/ilikerust/0823111944b.jpg

:d

But I do quite often use the #8 to joint an edge, rather than the machine. In fact, most of the time if I'm going to glue up a panel, I'll usually use the hand plane to shoot the edges, rather than drag the machine out of the corner.

Jay Greer
09-01-2011, 01:57 AM
Here is a planer jointer that I picked up at a used tool sale for $600 bucks, the Swiss made Inca Planer Jointer. Normally the tool would sell for over a grand! It will handle a ten inch wide cut and has a bed that is over 48" in length. The three blade "Tersa" head uses two sided disposible blades that are a cinch to change. A normal blade change can be done in less than two minutes and there is absoluttely no adjustment needed! The cutter head is mounted on a slight skew which produces silky smooth cuts even on gnarly or reversse grain. I highly endorse this primo tool!
Jay
http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a1d610b3127ccefdaa8c7b3bc400000030O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

seo
09-05-2011, 09:25 PM
I got my brother's seventies-era INCA ten inch jointer planer when he went to separate machines. Good things about the INCA are that they're quite well built, and lightweight. Maybe 90 Lbs for machine, stand, and motor. Mine is the older, two blade (resharpenable) style, but the gibbs and adjusters are easy to work.
Disadvantages are that the blade guard on the jointer is okay, but is not as fool-proof as a regular jointer. Also, because the planer bed is aluminum, if you do a lot of planing the bed will wear down. I have a liner for the infeed bed that's nothing but a piece of 1/2" plywood with a transverse cleat screwed to it to keep the liner from being drawn into the cutter knives. I've used the same liner that my brother made for it 20-some years ago.
Another problem is that parts can be hard to get. They were originally imported into the US by Garret-Wade, but now I don't know.
Anyway, it's a good combination machine. It slices, it dices, it wails, it moans. It slithers on her belly like a reptile...
No, that's something else.
Here is a long internet thread about the 10" machine:
http://festoolownersgroup.com/other-tools-accessories/inca-jointerplaner/
SEO

Nicholas Carey
09-06-2011, 01:38 PM
I got my brother's seventies-era INCA ten inch jointer planer when he went to separate machines. Good things about the INCA are that they're quite well built, and lightweight. Maybe 90 Lbs for machine, stand, and motor. Mine is the older, two blade (resharpenable) style, but the gibbs and adjusters are easy to work.

FWIW, if you've got a Tersa cutterhead in your jointer and/or planer, you can use Tersa knives from any supplier, like this one (http://www.simantechinc.com/index.php?l=product_list&c=2): just order the correct length.


Disadvantages are that the blade guard on the jointer is okay, but is not as fool-proof as a regular jointer. Also, because the planer bed is aluminum, if you do a lot of planing the bed will wear down. I have a liner for the infeed bed that's nothing but a piece of 1/2" plywood with a transverse cleat screwed to it to keep the liner from being drawn into the cutter knives. I've used the same liner that my brother made for it 20-some years ago.

Another problem is that parts can be hard to get. They were originally imported into the US by Garret-Wade, but now I don't know.

INCA machinery isn't imported in the US any more. But supposedly one can order INCA parts from

Eagle Tools
3027 Treadwell Street
Los Angeles, CA 90065
323-999-2909 (vox)
323-999-2920 (fax)

http://www.eagle-tools.com/

The INCA machinery mother base seems to be in Switzerland these days: at Döbeli Holz- Departement INCA: http://www.doebeli.ch/v1.x/index.php. However, when you click the English option, it says, "To all our customers in the U.S. and Canada: For insurance reasons we are not able to deliver our products directly to your country. We would be glad to deliver to any address you give us in Switzerland or within Europe. Thank you for your understanding." Dunno if that applies to replacement/repair parts or not. [This to me makes it sound to as if they don't want to deal with OSHA and CPSC regulations and getting a UL listing...and hence don't want the potential liability headaches US customers would bring to the table.]

However, with a little googly-moogly, it appears that you can order parts from the US via France: http://www.incamachines.com/. They've got a page for United States contact info that lets you send them an email, along with phone numbers (when calling from North America, don't forget the 011 internation prefix):

+33: 3 85.48.66.72 (vox)
+33: 3 85.48.69.13 (fax)

From the phone numbers, this company looks to be located somewhere in the Vendée (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vendée) (Department 85 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Departments_of_France)).

Edited to add... This post over at Sawmill Creek (http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?45609-Inca-570-Jointer-Planer&p=461680#post461680) says that http://www.incamachines.com/ is the actual INCA factory.

Bob Cleek
09-06-2011, 02:32 PM
Here is a planer jointer that I picked up at a used tool sale for $600 bucks, the Swiss made Inca Planer Jointer. Normally the tool would sell for over a grand! It will handle a ten inch wide cut and has a bed that is over 48" in length. The three blade "Tersa" head uses two sided disposible blades that are a cinch to change. A normal blade change can be done in less than two minutes and there is absoluttely no adjustment needed! The cutter head is mounted on a slight skew which produces silky smooth cuts even on gnarly or reversse grain. I highly endorse this primo tool!
Jay
http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a1d610b3127ccefdaa8c7b3bc400000030O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

Sorry about the thread drift...

Hey, Jay, did you build your cyclone dust system yourself or is it a store-boughten one? A cyclone is about the only tool I don't have at this point, but I've been thinking of trying to scrounge one. The off-the-shelf jobs are expensive for my needs. Living in the country, I just roll my Delta/Rockwell planer out the shop door and let 'em fly, but with table and band saws and so on, that gets to be a pain, too. The problem I find is that the commercially sold cyclones are all sold with "milimicron" dust bag filters and all that. All I need is an empty oil drum underneath the outlet, since I can run the outlet through the wall to outside. I know there's a DIY cyclone website, but their cyclone cylinders and vacuum motors ain't cheap, either. (And i am... cheap, that is.)

Also, is that a 6" Atlas/Craftsman engine lathe you've got on your bench there?

Nicholas Carey
09-06-2011, 02:59 PM
Sorry about the thread drift...

Hey, Jay, did you build your cyclone dust system yourself or is it a store-boughten one? A cyclone is about the only tool I don't have at this point, but I've been thinking of trying to scrounge one. The off-the-shelf jobs are expensive for my needs. Living in the country, I just roll my Delta/Rockwell planer out the shop door and let 'em fly, but with table and band saws and so on, that gets to be a pain, too. The problem I find is that the commercially sold cyclones are all sold with "milimicron" dust bag filters and all that. All I need is an empty oil drum underneath the outlet, since I can run the outlet through the wall to outside. I know there's a DIY cyclone website, but their cyclone cylinders and vacuum motors ain't cheap, either. (And i am... cheap, that is.)

Also, is that a 6" Atlas/Craftsman engine lathe you've got on your bench there?Take a look at Phil Thien's web site (http://www.cgallery.com/jpthien/cy.htm). He's come with a separator ("baffle") that's easy to build and seems to do about 90 percent of what a good cyclone will do. People have been retrofitting them to low-cost mobile dust collectors (like Harbor Freight's offering):

The builder's forum is also at his web site, at http://www.cgallery.com/smf/index.php?board=1.0, but Sawmill Creek has a lot of people building/talking about them too (http://www.sawmillcreek.org/forumdisplay.php?40-WorkShops).

Here's a fairly typical testimonial: http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?113351-Thien-Baffle-update
(http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?113351-Thien-Baffle-update)

Thien Baffle update
I've been using a Penn State DC2 2 h.p. dust collector for a while now. I've collected two bags like this since installing the baffle

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=119545&d=1243701813&thumb=1 (http://www.sawmillcreek.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=119545&d=1243701813)

I didnt' do anything to clean the filter-I wanted to see how much stuff would fine its way into the cartridge filter. I slapped the filter a few times before removing it. Here's what fell out.

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=119548&d=1243701980&thumb=1
(http://www.sawmillcreek.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=119548&d=1243701980)
Here's what made its way into the cartridge.

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=119547&d=1243701834&thumb=1 (http://www.sawmillcreek.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=119547&d=1243701834)



A couple of videos:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SswUX_keN1M&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SswUX_keN1M&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7xZtoRwruk
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7xZtoRwruk)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7xZtoRwruk

Don Z.
09-06-2011, 04:31 PM
Sorry about the thread drift...

Hey, Jay, did you build your cyclone dust system yourself or is it a store-boughten one? A cyclone is about the only tool I don't have at this point, but I've been thinking of trying to scrounge one. The off-the-shelf jobs are expensive for my needs. Living in the country, I just roll my Delta/Rockwell planer out the shop door and let 'em fly, but with table and band saws and so on, that gets to be a pain, too. The problem I find is that the commercially sold cyclones are all sold with "milimicron" dust bag filters and all that. All I need is an empty oil drum underneath the outlet, since I can run the outlet through the wall to outside. I know there's a DIY cyclone website, but their cyclone cylinders and vacuum motors ain't cheap, either. (And i am... cheap, that is.)

Also, is that a 6" Atlas/Craftsman engine lathe you've got on your bench there?

Bill Pentz has the info you'll need to design the size you want. Cost will be for the materials, and you don't need to buy someone else's cylinder.

The motor, on the other hand... well, those do cost. I can't help you there, but there is Craig's List.

Bob Cleek
09-07-2011, 02:36 AM
Take a look at Phil Thien's web site (http://www.cgallery.com/jpthien/cy.htm). He's come with a separator ("baffle") that's easy to build and seems to do about 90 percent of what a good cyclone will do. People have been retrofitting them to low-cost mobile dust collectors (like Harbor Freight's offering):

The builder's forum is also at his web site, at http://www.cgallery.com/smf/index.php?board=1.0, but Sawmill Creek has a lot of people building/talking about them too (http://www.sawmillcreek.org/forumdisplay.php?40-WorkShops).

Here's a fairly typical testimonial: http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?113351-Thien-Baffle-update
(http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?113351-Thien-Baffle-update)

Thien Baffle update
I've been using a Penn State DC2 2 h.p. dust collector for a while now. I've collected two bags like this since installing the baffle

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=119545&d=1243701813&thumb=1 (http://www.sawmillcreek.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=119545&d=1243701813)

I didnt' do anything to clean the filter-I wanted to see how much stuff would fine its way into the cartridge filter. I slapped the filter a few times before removing it. Here's what fell out.

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=119548&d=1243701980&thumb=1
(http://www.sawmillcreek.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=119548&d=1243701980)
Here's what made its way into the cartridge.

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=119547&d=1243701834&thumb=1 (http://www.sawmillcreek.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=119547&d=1243701834)



A couple of videos:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SswUX_keN1M&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SswUX_keN1M&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7xZtoRwruk
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7xZtoRwruk)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7xZtoRwruk

Thanks for the tip, Nick!