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Paul Girouard
07-17-2011, 03:40 PM
One of my clients is reading a book "Shantaram" about the siege of Kandahar seems the saying came from Lord Fredrick Roberts being called Uncle Bobs by this troops, and if he where in charge everything would be well , Bobs your Uncle.

So is that where the saying originates? Fitting that even as far from "most" people Kandahar is , it has this reference in it's past.

Mrleft8
07-17-2011, 09:01 PM
I thought it came from Steve Erwin....

Phillip Allen
07-17-2011, 09:03 PM
I had an uncle Robert... a good hunter, provider and excellent story teller... Anticortes (sp), Washington

sometimes I still miss him... gone for 25 years now

Paul Girouard
07-17-2011, 10:30 PM
So much for help from the boys down under eh!

Vince Brennan
07-17-2011, 11:13 PM
I thought it came from Steve Erwin....
Naaahh... Stevie's quote was, "Bleedin' "ell! Wot was THAT?"

seanz
07-18-2011, 12:08 AM
I thought it was "That doesn't half sting, Ray"

Gerarddm
07-18-2011, 12:21 AM
My understanding is that it comes from Brit politics pre-WWI. I wish I had 'Dreadnought' available to research the personages involved, but it's packed away. Anyway, IIRC, there was a senior poohbah in gov't named Robert something, and a less-qualified nephew got a cushy job because of his influence. Therefore ...'and Bob's yer uncle' was a saying implying the easy fix was in and done. Or something like that.

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
07-18-2011, 04:47 AM
My understanding is that it comes from Brit politics pre-WWI. I wish I had 'Dreadnought' available to research the personages involved, but it's packed away. Anyway, IIRC, there was a senior poohbah in gov't named Robert something, and a less-qualified nephew got a cushy job because of his influence. Therefore ...'and Bob's yer uncle' was a saying implying the easy fix was in and done. Or something like that.

That was my understanding, PM Robert Cecil appointed nephew Arthur Balfour as Chief Secretary for Ireland.

seanz
07-18-2011, 05:50 AM
Well, that makes it official then.
;)

Paul Pless
07-18-2011, 06:01 AM
This is Bob, best dog ever!

http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg239/PaulPless/bobkat.jpg

This is Molly, Bob's her uncle. . .

http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg239/PaulPless/DSC_0020.jpg

PeterSibley
07-18-2011, 06:12 AM
One of my clients is reading a book "Shantaram" about the siege of Kandahar seems the saying came from Lord Fredrick Roberts being called Uncle Bobs by this troops, and if he where in charge everything would be well , Bobs your Uncle.

So is that where the saying originates? Fitting that even as far from "most" people Kandahar is , it has this reference in it's past.

Wiki agrees with you .

One theory regarding the origin of the phrase is that it refers to Lord Frederick Roberts (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord_Frederick_Roberts) (1832-1914. 1st Earl (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl) Roberts, Roberts of Kandahar (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kandahar)).[citation needed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Citation_needed)] Roberts was an Anglo-Irish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Irish) soldier, born in India (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/India), who fought and commanded in India, Abyssinia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethiopian_Empire), Afghanistan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afghanistan), and South Africa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Africa). Roberts was one of the most successful commanders of the Victorian Era (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victorian_Era) and was cited for numerous acts of gallantry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gallantry). His finest hour was perhaps the lifting of the siege of Kandahar (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kandahar) in 1878, in which he marched a force of 10,000 men more than 300 miles from Kabul (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kabul), winning a battle, and successfully lifting the siege. Well respected amongst his men, Roberts was affectionately referred to as 'Uncle Bobs'. Generally meaning 'all will be well', and often used to indicate a successful outcome, the phrase "Bob's your uncle" was a term originally used by Roberts's men to boost confidence among the ranks and imply that all would be well under his command.[citation needed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Citation_needed)]
Another explanation is that the phrase dates to 1887, when British Prime Minister Robert Cecil, Lord Salisbury (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord_Salisbury) decided to appoint Arthur Balfour (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Balfour) to the prestigious and sensitive post of Chief Secretary for Ireland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chief_Secretary_for_Ireland) in an act of nepotism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nepotism). Lord Salisbury was Arthur Balfour's uncle. The difficulty with that explanation is that—despite extensive searching—the earliest known published uses of the phrase are from 1932, two from 1937, and two from 1938. (See these and other quotes in American Dialect Society (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Dialect_Society) list archived posts by Stephen Goranson.)[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob%27s_your_uncle#cite_note-0)[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob%27s_your_uncle#cite_note-1)
Another theory is that it derives from the slang phrase "All is bob," meaning that everything is safe, pleasant or satisfactory. This dates back to the eighteenth century or so (it’s in Captain Francis Grose’s Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dictionary_of_the_Vulgar_Tongue) of 1785). There have been several other slang expressions containing "bob," some associated with thievery or gambling, and from the eighteenth century on it was also a common generic name for someone one didn’t know. Any or all of these might have contributed to the genesis of the expression.[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob%27s_your_uncle#cite_note-2)
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