PDA

View Full Version : Tiller Designs



Corrib
01-19-2005, 09:26 AM
Hi Guys, need some slick ideas on lifting tiller designs. I am building a Hartley Trailer sailer 21. The tiller is made from plywood and the issue I have is getting the blade up and down, springs?
elastic? any ideas?

Thanks

Kevin

Ian McColgin
01-19-2005, 09:39 AM
Around here the tiller is the stick that controls the rudder. Rudders are not uncommonly made of plywood and go up and down. It can be useful if the tiller is free to pivot up and down in the hand. But I think your question referrs to what I call the rudder.

The easiest structure to make is essentially wood or metal cheek pieces to embrace the rudder blade and provide a place for the pivot pin. One can indulge in lots of entertaining engineering thoughts but for lightness and strength I'd keep the pin as far aft as possible so that it also serves to keep the cheeks alligned with each other and reduce the individual racking strain.

The simplest control is to weight the rudder blade low somewhere - easy to let in some lead. It'll sink just fine. Have a little tag line at the trailing edge coming up over the rudder stock and securable to someplace handy like a wee cleat on the tiller. That'll get it up and keep it up.

If you go for an unweighted rudder, you'll have to hold it down with a second line the comes around (perhaps in a notch let into the radiused upper and upper leading edge of the blade) and up inside or ahead of the rudder stock. This might be partly bungee to absorb any run-aground shocks.

Or you could buy and modify the sailfish rig.

Lotta choises. Surprised you don't seem to have a good one with the boat plans.

G'luck

JimD
01-19-2005, 10:42 AM
Like Ian says. The easiest way is weighted to hold it down, and a rope to pull it up. I've made two of them. It's not hard to design your own.

Bob Smalser
01-19-2005, 11:25 AM
How about like this? Mr. Hartley's design with minor modification.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3075025/81689827.jpg

The blade isn't weighted, there is a shock cord "spring" that pulls it down when the lanyard is released from the jam cleat.

And notice I put a double fetch on the raising lanyard using a seperate block to easily overcome the spring tension of the shock cord spring.

Works just dandy.

[ 01-19-2005, 11:30 AM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

DougWilde
01-19-2005, 07:42 PM
http://dbwilde.home.comcast.net/BoatScans/rudder.jpg

Will kick-up, can be raised simply by pulling the tiller, can be locked up. No funny bits of string or bungee or extra hardware.

Doug Wilde

ssor
01-19-2005, 08:26 PM
Nice work Guys.

Corrib
01-20-2005, 04:05 AM
Tanks guys, for all the great information and pictures. Any of the above ideas will work very well.

Regards

Kevin

cbob
01-21-2005, 12:36 PM
Bob, The nav light shown, on the stern, a 20 point, is the one that is for the bow end of the boat, called a masthead or steaming light, sailboat under power or motorboat underway, probably not required for the size boat shown, anyway the light, required here, is a twelve pointer. Is this the one Brian M. is trying to find a a glass lens for? cbob

N. Scheuer
01-21-2005, 01:45 PM
I really like the arrangement DougWild posted. It is very much like a spring-loaded arrangement I had in an old Alcourt Catfish catamaran, except the cat had cast aluminum rudder heads, aluminum plate blades, and aluminum tube tillers. It (they?) worked very well, but I like the aesthetics of Doug's wooden assembly better.

Moby Nick

Bob Smalser
01-21-2005, 01:46 PM
Originally posted by cbob:
Bob, The nav light shown, on the stern, a 20 point, is the one that is for the bow end of the boat, called a masthead or steaming light, sailboat under power or motorboat underway, probably not required for the size boat shown, anyway the light, required here, is a twelve pointer. cbobI know, thanks. It's a vintage runabout windshield light.

I like the look.

[ 01-21-2005, 02:09 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Paul Piercey
01-24-2005, 02:17 PM
http://forums.bateau2.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10167/kurclos.jpg

I used eye straps to secure the lines, a jam cleat on the rudder head to secure the line in the up position, and a special jam cleat (releases if you hit something) on the bottom of the tiller to hold the rudder down. There is a gap between the pintalls and the edge of the rudder. I ran the line that holds the rudder down through these gaps, up through a turning block (I could have just used an eye strap) to the special jam cleat

Paul