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Ross M
05-02-2011, 09:23 PM
It appears blowing of the fuse plug is imminent. Tough choice, IMO.

http://www.cnn.com/2011/US/05/02/missouri.levee.breach/index.html?hpt=T2

Cuyahoga Chuck
05-03-2011, 08:47 AM
The Corps of Engineers buildeth,
The Corps of Engineers taketh away.
The Mississippi will not be harnessed.

Y Bar Ranch
05-03-2011, 12:34 PM
“The Project Flood is upon us,” Maj. Gen. Michael Walsh, President of the Mississippi River
Commission said today. “This is the flood that engineers envisioned following the 1927 flood. It is
testing the system like never before.”

Means this is a 1 in every 500 years flood. Yeeha. Hope the Old River Control Structure holds.

Bruce Hooke
05-03-2011, 02:34 PM
Has anyone heard how far south the impacts of this flooding are likely to be felt in a really serious way? In the past it has seemed like lower flow volumes on many of the tributaries in the southern part of the Mississippi River watershed has meant that flooding in the middle part of the Mississippi has not meant serious flooding in the southern Mississippi, down in Louisiana and Mississippi. From this map (http://www.srh.noaa.gov/lmrfc/?n=lowerohio,lowermississippi,andlowerarkansasrive rs) it looks like the major flooding will extend down to southern Mississippi but it is hard to tell if this is "routine" major flooding or something more along the lines of 1927-level flooding.

Memphis Mike
05-03-2011, 07:09 PM
Has anyone heard how far south the impacts of this flooding are likely to be felt in a really serious way? In the past it has seemed like lower flow volumes on many of the tributaries in the southern part of the Mississippi River watershed has meant that flooding in the middle part of the Mississippi has not meant serious flooding in the southern Mississippi, down in Louisiana and Mississippi. From this map (http://www.srh.noaa.gov/lmrfc/?n=lowerohio,lowermississippi,andlowerarkansasrive rs) it looks like the major flooding will extend down to southern Mississippi but it is hard to tell if this is "routine" major flooding or something more along the lines of 1927-level flooding.

This is anything but routine. I've been in Memphis for 25 years and have seen nothing like this. We have property damage already in the millions and the river is not expected to crest until May 11 at 48 feet. All of the rivers and creeks around here are backed up and flooding because with the Mississippi this high, they have no where to go.

Ross M
05-03-2011, 08:26 PM
Has anyone heard how far south the impacts of this flooding are likely to be felt in a really serious way? In the past it has seemed like lower flow volumes on many of the tributaries in the southern part of the Mississippi River watershed has meant that flooding in the middle part of the Mississippi has not meant serious flooding in the southern Mississippi, down in Louisiana and Mississippi. From this map (http://www.srh.noaa.gov/lmrfc/?n=lowerohio,lowermississippi,andlowerarkansasrive rs) it looks like the major flooding will extend down to southern Mississippi but it is hard to tell if this is "routine" major flooding or something more along the lines of 1927-level flooding.

It does not look good. AP is reporting that some parts of Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana are expected to reach levels not seen since the 1920s: http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_SEVERE_WEATHER_FLOODING?SITE=FLTAM&SECTION=US

Phillip Allen
05-03-2011, 08:35 PM
This is anything but routine. I've been in Memphis for 25 years and have seen nothing like this. We have property damage already in the millions and the river is not expected to crest until May 11 at 48 feet. All of the rivers and creeks around here are backed up and flooding because with the Mississippi this high, they have no where to go.

put new line on the fish poles...there may be cat fish strandings up those creeks when the river goes down again

Memphis Mike
05-03-2011, 09:22 PM
What's the population of Cairo, Ill? I guess the ACE knows what they are doing?

dredbob
05-03-2011, 09:36 PM
I'm curious, what effect does the Mississippi flooding like this have on the major tributaries like the Ohio? Does it cause flooding higher up on the Ohio, or just worse flooding around the confluence?

Bob

Shang
05-03-2011, 10:36 PM
Here's a modest sample of the narration of Pare Lorentz's film The River. I'll try to get the rest posted this weekend. It's a powerful example of free-verse, in a classic documentary film.

"…the Yellowstone, the Milk, the White and
Cheyenne;
The Cannonball, the Musselshell, the James
and the Sioux;
of trees...
Black spruce and Norway pine,
Douglas fir and Red cedar...
...as well as the cities that line the waterways...
New Orleans to Baton Rouge,
Baton Rouge to Natchez,
Natchez to Vicksburg,
There was lumber in the North
and coal in the hills.
Iron and coal down the Monongahela.
Iron and coal down the Allegheny.
Food and water needed at Louisville: 500 dead,
5000 ill;
Food and water needed at Cincinnati;
Food and water and shelter and clothing
needed for 750,000 flood victims…
We cut the tops off of a hundred mountains and sent them down the river..."

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f93/shangboat/kcflood.jpg

I was in the Explorer Scouts in 1951 when Kansas City was flooded. Our troop manned a water-distribution center in North-east Johnson county when the water mains broke and cut off supplies to most of Kansas City.

Bruce Hooke
05-04-2011, 08:11 AM
I'm curious, what effect does the Mississippi flooding like this have on the major tributaries like the Ohio? Does it cause flooding higher up on the Ohio, or just worse flooding around the confluence?

Bob

Near the confluence the high water levels on the Mississippi will of course cause a tributary like the Ohio to back up. However, that direct backing up effect is not going to have significant impacts all that far upriver. Yes, the fact that river is backed up at the mouth will slow the current a little for some distance upriver and result in slightly higher water levels, but I am pretty sure that effect is quite small. Of course it very much depends on the gradient of the river. On a river with a very low gradient the backing up effect will carry further upriver than on a river with a steeper gradient. If there are any dams/locks then of course it all stops there and what happens above the dam is unconnected with what happens below the dam. That is unless the decision is made to use the dam to hold back extra water to reduce the impact of the flooding downriver, but most dams on major rivers seem to have pretty limited unused storage capacity behind them so unless the water level behind the dam was drawn down in anticipation of the need to have extra storage capacity there is not much that can be done to hold back additional water.

skuthorp
05-04-2011, 08:25 AM
Round the world recently we seem to have been having a lot of "one in 100/500/1000 year weather events. Let's hope that that assesment is right. Keep safe everyone.