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Memphis Mike
04-08-2011, 10:13 PM
High Beam or Low beam At night? I've been doing quite a bit of night riding lately and the thought occured to me is a motorcycle headlight on high beam really that aggravating to the driver of an automoble? I see much better at night with mine on high and have intentions of adding auxilary lights to better light the road ahead. I guess my question is should I keep my lights on high at all times at night?

David G
04-08-2011, 10:16 PM
If your headlight(s) are adjusted correctly, you should have to dim them for oncoming traffic.

coelacanth2
04-08-2011, 10:18 PM
High beams whenever possible, lows for oncoming traffic - bike headlight is a lot higher off the road and can be irritating to other drivers. Ive got an h4 on my guzzi, can be kinda bright...

Steve McMahon
04-08-2011, 10:20 PM
I have always treated my high beam on the bikes the same as in a car, dimming to low beam when I meet a car. As I have aged though, I have to admit that I try not to drive the bike much at night - I'm in a rural area and the potential threats (critters etc...) are exponentially higher in the dark.

perldog007
04-08-2011, 10:31 PM
No, but if you're really moving it's a different story. Don't want to outrun your low beams, or upset the blind, drunk, asleep cage drivers. I never did in traffic, but I was never that fast at night sometimes 80-90 on the beltway with traffic. Sport riding at night ain't my game. For commuting my vote is no. YMMV.

Memphis Mike
04-08-2011, 11:46 PM
I have always treated my high beam on the bikes the same as in a car, dimming to low beam when I meet a car. As I have aged though, I have to admit that I try not to drive the bike much at night - I'm in a rural area and the potential threats (critters etc...) are exponentially higher in the dark.

Yeah, my fifty two year old eyes aren't what they used to be. I guess I'm just looking for a solution. I don't want to give up night riding.

perldog007
04-08-2011, 11:52 PM
I went down real hard in 2000, nearly lost life, then almost lost leg. I got back on for two more years and gave it up in 2003. I would love to ride again, but the cars get faster and more aggressive every year. Like or not, we get just a little slower every year.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
04-09-2011, 01:29 AM
High Beam or Low beam At night? I've been doing quite a bit of night riding lately and the thought occured to me is a motorcycle headlight on high beam really that aggravating to the driver of an automoble? I see much better at night with mine on high and have intentions of adding auxilary lights to better light the road ahead. I guess my question is should I keep my lights on high at all times at night?

This is either quite a witty troll or - and there is the other possibility - an indication that you need to get your eyesight checked.

What is your current prescription for low light distance vision?

ishmael
04-09-2011, 02:13 AM
I haven't ridden in awhile Mike, but a high beam on a bike can be just as annoying as when it's on a car. Lower your beam for oncoming traffic. It's not only polite, it's safer.

JayInOz
04-09-2011, 02:20 AM
Riding into oncoming traffic with your lights on high beam at night is just plain bad manners, not to mention dangerous for you and oncoming traffic. Loss of night vision for us older blokes is a worry and there's not a lot we can do about it- yellow low light shooting glasses can help. Around here if you don't dip your lights, the other feller will light you up with everything he has- then you're really blind:) When we locals see the glow from the lights of an oncoming vehicle nearing the crest of a hill, we all dip our lights just before we clear the crest. It's Saturday here and the area is crawling with tourists- mostly touring the wineries. And without fail at night every one of them will blind us for a couple of seconds before dipping their lights. They also drive at half the speed limit, stop without warning, turn without indicating, and do everything else possible to be bottom orifices:) And while it is possible to ride fast enough to outride your headlights on a modern bike, with the number of large animals on the roads around here, night flying tends to end quickly and spectacularly. JayInOz

The Bigfella
04-09-2011, 02:44 AM
Anyone in any vehicle that hits me with high beam at night discovers that their retinas can burn. I've run enhanced lights on every vehicle I've had (including company-supplied ones) since I outran my lights when I was 17.... and ended up in hospital.

My main bike now has two rather cheap, but effective LED auxilliaries. They draw 0.2 amps on low beam and 1.8 amps each on high. On high, you don't want to be looking at them. I've recently got onto the +80 H7 halogen bulbs too... and they make a nice difference.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
04-09-2011, 02:48 AM
High beam on a bike is more ditracting than on a car as the light is placed higher. Dip them and ride within your vision.

PeterSibley
04-09-2011, 02:49 AM
Anyone in any vehicle that hits me with high beam at night discovers that their retinas can burn. I've run enhanced lights on every vehicle I've had (including company-supplied ones) since I outran my lights when I was 17.... and ended up in hospital.

My main bike now has two rather cheap, but effective LED auxilliaries. They draw 0.2 amps on low beam and 1.8 amps each on high. On high, you don't want to be looking at them. I've recently got onto the +80 H7 halogen bulbs too... and they make a nice difference.

I'm rereading that ADV thread right now .http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=607184&page=67

The Bigfella
04-09-2011, 02:54 AM
I'm rereading that ADV thread right now .http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=607184&page=67

Except that I bought mine direct from Hong Kong. Paid $50 each, landed. I used the dimmer switch and wiring diagram that's on about p20 +/- of that thread.

PeterSibley
04-09-2011, 03:05 AM
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=607184&page=22 wiring diagram .

I'll get some but not yet ,dollars are short .I'll get the vendors address then .

The Bigfella
04-09-2011, 03:12 AM
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=607184&page=22 wiring diagram .

I'll get some but not yet ,dollars are short .I'll get the vendors address then .

Sorry Peter.... I've given you a bum steer. Its on p 28.

It modulates (or whatever) the negative side of the circuit.

Here .... save this to your PC

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff112/igatenby/Third/AuxLEDLightsRelayDiagram.png

All credit due to wazzisname, who did the diagram.

btw... I've had to upgrade to photoshop pro.... too much traffic from my ride report.

ishmael
04-09-2011, 03:37 AM
This thread has me dangerously close to contemplating getting another bike. There is nothing quite so like riding the highways and byways so exposed. Sailing a small boat in rough seas is close, and different.

As with many fantasies, this one too shall pass.But riding that bike, no helmet, a fair lass on the back of the bike, does stir things far away. I never did know her name.

PeterSibley
04-09-2011, 03:55 AM
Thanks Ian ...do you have a dimmer on the low beam ?

The Bigfella
04-09-2011, 04:14 AM
That setup means that the aux lights can be turned off, if you wish (which I don't do), otherwise, they are on dimmed unless on high beam. Which, incidentally, is what the law requires here.

PeterSibley
04-09-2011, 04:26 AM
It sounds like the right setup ,I can't think of a reason to turn them off but it's an option worth having .

The Bigfella
04-09-2011, 04:50 AM
You have to be able to do it in NSW. Defect notice otherwise. Call them running lights, not fog lights too.

LeeG
04-09-2011, 05:18 AM
question, does a motorcycles short wheelbase make for greater bouncing of the headlights focus so the cut-off at the top of the beam cuts close/far providing for inconsistent illumination on low beam?

PeterSibley
04-09-2011, 05:21 AM
That would require a pretty bad road surface I'd say .

JayInOz
04-09-2011, 05:38 AM
We've had a couple of weeks of beautiful autumn weather here. Tomorrow the wife and I will be going to a surprise 85th birthday party for my Dad- a hundred and something miles through interesting countryside on a very nice Harley. Tomorrows weather forecast?- showers tending to rain with strong, cold south westerly winds. Doesn't bother me but the missus hates riding in bad weather- so it looks like we take the car:( JayInOz

PeterSibley
04-09-2011, 05:54 AM
Jay ,you have to post a photo of your Harley ...... please !

Ron Williamson
04-09-2011, 06:50 AM
How would one of those headlight modulators affect your vision while riding at night?

BTW,I rarely flash my highs at an oncoming vehicle.Most times they are already on low,but very bright, and two blinded drivers are worse than one.
People flash their highs at me when my when my truck is fully loaded and draggin' 'er arse.
R

Memphis Mike
04-09-2011, 09:04 AM
For some reason I see much better at night through the windshield of my car than the visor of my helmet. Headlight glare seems to be worse on the bike and shadows worse also. What about a slightly tented visor?

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
04-09-2011, 09:27 AM
Can you not get anti-scratch visors there?

They are compulsory here - and a bloody good thing that is too.

ishmael
04-09-2011, 09:54 AM
Some of the newer technologies sound good. BTW, I almost always rode with a helmet, a good one, a Bell. I didn't ride a lot at night. I used the bike, for the most part, to get about on campus. It was good for that. A Suzy TS 250 I bought from my almost brother-in-law for three hundred dollars. Not much for the open road. The one long road trip I took on it, I regretted. It was too light, and not really designed for it.

Anyway, yeah, maybe look into the newer visor technology. Be safe out there, and have fun.

Memphis Mike
04-09-2011, 10:09 AM
It's the plastic. I go through two or three visors every season, because it's impossible to clean the visor without leaving fine scratches in it (unless you spend a lot of time with special plastic polishes). The fine scratches are what creates the glare. A three-snap visor costs me around $19... small price to pay for clear vision. I used to use a tinted one in the daytime, but gave that up, because I didn't like the attenuation at night, and all the swapping back and forth between the clear visor and the timted one just meant that they got scratched up a lot faster.

I think you're on to something here. My plastic lens glasses are scratched also. That coupled with a scratched visor I bet is creating my problem. I guess it's off to the eye doc soon.

Lew Barrett
04-09-2011, 11:32 AM
Most states have laws specifically prohibiting the use of high beams under specified conditions; namely when approaching other vehicles. Below is California's code. It is similar elsewhere. There are different rules for pre-war cars in the California code; generally even more restrictive.

Care of clear plastic and visors, and timely replacement of them as required, is something that you learn with experience. Nothing should be cleaned and polished with the care that is given to your helmet's visor. Many long distance riders carry a spare. There are some products that shouldn't be used on you clear plastic, and cleaning and polishing it becomes a special detail in the world of many experienced road riders.

The use of tinted visors is also illegal at night in most states.



24409. Whenever a motor vehicle is being operated during darkness, the driver shall use a distribution of light, or composite beam, directed high enough and of sufficient intensity to reveal persons and vehicles at a safe distance in advance of the vehicle, subject to the following requirements and limitations:

(a) Whenever the driver of a vehicle approaches an oncoming vehicle within 500 feet, he shall use a distribution of light or composite beam so aimed that the glaring rays are not projected into the eyes of the oncoming driver. The lowermost distribution of light specified in this article shall be deemed to avoid glare at all times regardless of road contour.

(b) Whenever the driver of a vehicle follows another vehicle within 300 feet to the rear, he shall use the lowermost distribution of light specified in this article.

Old vehicles.

24410. Headlamps arranged to provide a single distribution of light not supplemented by auxiliary driving lamps are permitted on motor vehicles manufactured and sold prior to September 19, 1940, in lieu of multiple-beam road lighting equipment if the single distribution of light complies with the following requirements and limitations.....(etc etc).

Memphis Mike
04-09-2011, 12:10 PM
What product should be used to polish it with?