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jack grebe
03-08-2011, 05:06 PM
self pat on the back.

it's been almost 3 yrs.....will be on 4/9
100% free


I would like to support others, and encourage others
to join the ranks of former nicotine addicts.

Tom Montgomery
03-08-2011, 05:26 PM
CONGRATULATIONS!

I have been 100% nicotine-free since 6/6/94.

It is one of the toughest addictions to kick. Comparable to heroin.

Paul Pless
03-08-2011, 05:31 PM
self pat on the backAwesome, I remember the threads leading up to your last day as a smoker.


It is one of the toughest addictions to kick. Comparable to heroin.I bet it just doesn't have the same sense of urgency that a good heroin bottom does though.

Tom Montgomery
03-08-2011, 05:40 PM
I simply remember a psychology class in the 90's where addiction was addressed. It seems that the power of various types of addictions were measured by a "relapse curve." This is a simple graph plotting the percentage of addicts who, upon quitting their drug, relapse over time. The graph for nicotine addicts and heroin addicts was essentially identical.

On a personal level, I have known junkies who have kicked heroin. I have known alcoholics who have maintained long-term sobreity. But many of them have simply been unable to stop smoking.

Old Dryfoot
03-08-2011, 06:04 PM
Keep posting people... I can use this! Thirty one years a smoker and I have never been more ready to kick the habit. I made a cold turkey attempt a few weeks back and made it to day 4, but I was overcome by the free handed fidgets, staying occupied and distracted from the fact that you no longer have a noxious burning weed hanging from your lips is tough. The physical aspects of not smoking were not as pronounced as I expected them to be though, insofar as cravings and urges that is, I did notice my sinus seemed to clear dramatically.

Hunky Dory
03-08-2011, 06:10 PM
I will be smoke free 3 yrs. on April 1st. You just have to remember that even one slip or back slide and you will be smoking again. The world smells a lot nicer with cigs out of your life, not to mention my truck.

pefjr
03-08-2011, 06:16 PM
CONGRATULATIONS!

Comparable to heroin.worse, comparable to WBF.

Concordia...41
03-08-2011, 06:19 PM
Three years, and then four years, and then ten years....

Keep up the good work!

-M

elf
03-08-2011, 06:22 PM
True addictions cannot be quit cold turkey. If you can quit something cold turkey your body was not addicted.

Work with a medical professional to wean yourself from the addiction.

And keep in mind that the human body is not inclined to all addictions. My father and I quit cold turkey, my father after at least 45 years of smoking tobacco, I after 12 years. I can be among smokers and be offended by the odor, but I feel no desire for the substance.

If that's not you, you simply can't quit cold turkey and there's no use beating yourself over the head about it.

And don't put me where there is sugar for free.

Bruce Taylor
03-08-2011, 06:33 PM
Well done, Jack.Y>

Tom Montgomery
03-08-2011, 06:37 PM
Here is how I quit:

Over a month's time I cut back from 2 packs a day to 1 pack a day. I did this by planning each day's smoke and smoking only on schedule.

I then took a leave of absence from work (thereby abrubtly changing my daily routine).

I quit smoking but weaned off nicotine with the use of nicotine patches: 21 mg, 14 mg & 7 mg. Two weeks on each. This served two purposes: nicotine intake was completely separated from the physical act of smoking while the level of nicotine in my bloodstream was stabilized (smoking inevitably results in spikes of nicotine).

Good luck.



I used a nicotine patch that weaned Nevski

stumpbumper
03-08-2011, 06:47 PM
Quitting is easy. I did it hundreds of times. But, I have been smoke-free since 6-1-02. For about the first five years there were occasional cravings that were really difficult to deal with. Now I have no cravings, and I even find the odor of cigarettes repulsive in restaurants.

McMike
03-08-2011, 06:55 PM
I quit a 2 pack a day addiction on 9/1/06. I did it cold turkey after 10 years of smoking heavily.

At 2 packs a day, $6 a pack, I've saved almost $22,000 and who knows how many years of my life.

Sorry Elf, if I wasn't addicted, I don't know who is.

Iceboy
03-08-2011, 07:18 PM
2 years 5 months for me. Smoked for 40 years. Chantix made me quit. Worked wonders for me. YMMV.

George Jung
03-08-2011, 07:29 PM
Congrats; incredibly difficult task, with unbelieveable long term health benefits.

What everyone has said here is true. Everyones' experience is unique, and what works for one may not for the next person. I refer everyone to the SD Quitline (suspect every state has this); the statistics are: those who seek counseling have 2X the success rate of those who don't; and those who get counseling plus any of the medicines (chantix, zyban, nicotine products) have 4X the success rate. That said, not all counseling services are 'equal'; not everyone responds the same to the meds. And until you're actually ready to quit, 'trying' is useless. Four serious attempts to success is the average. And in my opinion, the only thing more difficult than quitting is - staying quit. I hear the same story all the time. 'I was quit for 20 years (variable), came home for my highschool reunion, decided to have a few beers at the Silver Dollar with the Boys and thought...
what the hell, I can have just one'...

As for most things, YMMV

Paul Pless
03-08-2011, 07:33 PM
True addictions cannot be quit cold turkey. If you can quit something cold turkey your body was not addicted.maybe, maybe not

jack grebe
03-08-2011, 07:38 PM
Keep posting people... I can use this! Thirty one years a smoker and I have never been more ready to kick the habit.
Then do it.

I too smoked since my teen yrs.
I too tried and failed several times.
I too have made it happen 1 day at a time.





so can you.


I still live one day at a time, still have cravings, and know
from past failures, what 1 cig can do.


set a date, let someone else know.....just to keep you
honest, and do it.

htom
03-08-2011, 08:03 PM
Congrats to those who've quit. I tried to quit for almost twenty years. I finally remembered training Harvey the Rat, and how to train to extinguish a behavior, and treated myself like a rat. Took me two years to be trained off smoking, then off nicotine gum, then off chewing gum, then off carrot sticks. Twenty-five years ago now, and I still get echos of the cravings when I go by a bunch of smokers.

Old Dryfoot
03-08-2011, 08:30 PM
I seldom smoke outdoors.Outside is the only place I will smoke. The smell of stale cigarette smoke is particularly offensive for me, on myself, the furniture, or other people... yuck! Cigars are different I think, though I had an old boss that use to smoke Pom Poms and some days he would just reek of cheap tobacco.

Just to add, I flushed what was left of my pack after my first post on this thread, 2.5 hrs and no one has been harmed so far... ;)

David G
03-08-2011, 08:49 PM
For all of you that have chosen to quit - kudos!

I'm just glad I never started. I can only imagine how hard it must be.

I'll stick with my pipe, though. No real addiction. I've set it aside for weeks, months, and years at a time... with no cravings or real notice even.

JimConlin
03-08-2011, 08:58 PM
Since 4/15/79

Iceboy
03-08-2011, 09:12 PM
"Just to add, I flushed what was left of my pack after my first post on this thread, 2.5 hrs and no one has been harmed so far... ;)"

Good luck! I have to say quitting was one of the best things I ever did. I'm still paying for smoking though. COPD. And as I type I hit my inhaler. I also currently am working off a case of pneumonia and a pleural effusion. Sucks to be back on steroids and not breathing. If I had kept on the chokers I'd most likely not be posting here today. Once again best of luck.

botebum
03-08-2011, 10:50 PM
Congrats Jack!

I started smoking when I was 13. When I was 38 my doctor told me I had emphysema and COPD and that if I didn't quit I'd be dead in five years. A year and a half later I stubbed out my last cigarette.
I still use nicotine (dip). I intend to address that challenge at some point.

Doug

ejds
03-08-2011, 11:50 PM
Here is how I quit:

Over a month's time I cut back from 2 packs a day to 1 pack a day. I did this by planning each day's smoke and smoking only on schedule.

I then took a leave of absence from work (thereby abrubtly changing my daily routine).

I quit smoking but weaned off nicotine with the use of nicotine patches: 21 mg, 14 mg & 7 mg. Two weeks on each. This served two purposes: nicotine intake was completely separated from the physical act of smoking while the level of nicotine in my bloodstream was stabilized (smoking inevitably results in spikes of nicotine).

Good luck.



I used a nicotine patch that weaned Nevski

The change of routine is a big factor in quitting. I quit the day we went on vacation and used the patches. That was 12 years ago.

Egbert

The Bigfella
03-08-2011, 11:58 PM
I put myself through university and it eventually came down to a choice between petrol in the motorbike or tobacco.... I couldn't cut my food bill any more than I already had. I, like all in my income bracket at the time rolled my own ciggies or smoked a pipe (I still have my pipes)... but I gave up the evil weed in 1974. Petrol won... but it wasn't easy giving up, even though I'd only smoked for a few years.

About 12 years later, one of my staff walked in and said "I haven't had a day off sick in my 56 years.... but I've got throat cancer" - he didn't make 57.

A few years after that, I was taken off to a meeting regarding an assignment with the local tobacco industry lobby group by the partner I was working for at Price Waterhouse. I walked out of the meeting and said, "sorry, I won't work for the merchants of death, you better find someone else if you want to do that job".

... so, well done Jack.... don't look back.

Ed Harrow
03-09-2011, 12:02 AM
Good on you, Jack.

I've been fascinated watching people quit. There's no (as was pointed out already) no common denominator. The first two I watched with real interest were a (pardon) ditzy dame and a guy getting on past 60. He always struck me as a sharp guy - he struggled and struggled, she just stopped...

bluedog225
03-09-2011, 12:04 AM
Congrats. 14 years w/o. It's a bitch. The way nicotine works, you can't feel "normal" w/o for quite a while. Receptors are blocked. So you have to feel like sh!t. That's just the way it is. Some love the electronic cigarettes. Harm reduction in a big way. Some are using nicotine to self medicate. Other meds might do the trick. Works for some drunks. Just my to cents. Good luck.

stevebaby
03-09-2011, 01:47 AM
CONGRATULATIONS!

I have been 100% nicotine-free since 6/6/94.

It is one of the toughest addictions to kick. Comparable to heroin.I'm just coming off the Oxycontin and Endone I've been on for the last 2 months,so I suppose I now have some sort of insight into narcotic withdrawal.
Giving up smoking was harder IMO.
I haven't smoked for 10 years or so now.

AussieBarney
03-09-2011, 01:59 AM
Tried patches, tried the champix, tried cold turkey. Nothing worked, I don't think I was serious at all, BUT, then I had an angina attack, ended up in casualty at the local hospital, they sent me to the regional hospital and they wacked a stent in the main artery to the heart, I dodged a four way bypass by incredible luck. The doc says to me "take your meds and give up the durries if you want to say hello to your grandkids" My response was" No wuckers doc, anything you want" I have not picked a durry since, 18 months I think. Rough way to give up but it worked.

johnw
03-09-2011, 02:12 AM
I watched my dad try to quit for most of my childhood and much of my adulthood. He finally got off tobacco, but now he's on oxygen. I smoked for about a week in high school, then thought, this is stupid, and quit before I got the addiction. I guess it helped me make the right decision to see that dad was trying to quit.

S/V Laura Ellen
03-09-2011, 02:19 AM
Congrats Jack!

goodbasil
03-09-2011, 03:27 AM
Good on ya. Almost 6 years for me. Can't believe the money I saved.

McMike
03-09-2011, 05:10 AM
Outside is the only place I will smoke. The smell of stale cigarette smoke is particularly offensive for me, on myself, the furniture, or other people... yuck! Cigars are different I think, though I had an old boss that use to smoke Pom Poms and some days he would just reek of cheap tobacco.

Just to add, I flushed what was left of my pack after my first post on this thread, 2.5 hrs and no one has been harmed so far... ;)

Good for you!!!! Just go at it with the mindset that smoking is not an option . . . ever. You will do fine.|:)Y>

John of Phoenix
03-09-2011, 02:52 PM
Good going Jack.
Good on ya. Almost 6 years for me. Can't believe the money I saved.
And the extra time you have.

Keep at it Dryfoot, the rewards are many and huge.

TomF
03-09-2011, 04:10 PM
I simply remember a psychology class in the 90's where addiction was addressed. It seems that the power of various types of addictions were measured by a "relapse curve." This is a simple graph plotting the percentage of addicts who, upon quitting their drug, relapse over time. The graph for nicotine addicts and heroin addicts was essentially identical.

On a personal level, I have known junkies who have kicked heroin. I have known alcoholics who have maintained long-term sobreity. But many of them have simply been unable to stop smoking.I've often said that when I turn 70, I'm gonna take up pipe smoking - cause I love the smell of good pipe tobacco. But maybe I should take up heroin instead. :D

(congrats to all you former-addicts!)

Jim Mahan
03-09-2011, 04:50 PM
"True addictions cannot be quit cold turkey. If you can quit something cold turkey your body was not addicted."

Bull dukey. I've personally known a couple of people who had the same cigarette habit as me and who also had a heroin habit and who have quit both, cold turkey (not at the same time).

I've smoked, everything tobacco—pipes, all kinds of cigars, all kinds of cigarettes, and including dip, chew, and snuff. Two packs of cigarettes per day from age fourteen to forty-seven. Quit once in the nineties for a year and started again.
Quit July 4, 2002; not a puff since. I did chew nicotine gum for a couple of weeks. Kept an 'it's a boy' decent handrolled cigar in a glass tube for about four years before I gave it away.
My personal vow is to never even touch another cigarette until they tell me I'm terminal. If I make it to seventy, I'm going start back up with a pipe, and if I make it to seventy-five, heroin. Tom, you posted while I was typing. I always enjoyed tobacco, after I got sick that first time. But I was only addicted to cigarettes. I know if I start up the pipe or cigars again, I'll be on cigarettes and up to two packs a day again in short order.

Jack, good for you. The longer you stay off, the more likely you are to stay off. The more times you try to quit the better your odds of quitting. Knowing that helped me a lot.

Old Dryfoot
03-09-2011, 04:53 PM
Thank to all for the encouragement. :)

That's day one done and over with, many more to come FSM willing.

Peerie Maa
03-09-2011, 04:59 PM
I watched my dad try to quit for most of my childhood and much of my adulthood. He finally got off tobacco, but now he's on oxygen. I smoked for about a week in high school, then thought, this is stupid, and quit before I got the addiction. I guess it helped me make the right decision to see that dad was trying to quit.

My Dad's had was a nasty irony. Dad lived on his nerves, so in order to calm him down when out fishing in the families boats before the War his doctor recommended that he start smoking roll ups. Had to be roll ups to give his hands something to do. Then in the '50's the medical profession realised that smoking was bad for you. He gave up smoking twice, put us through hell each time. Some bastard at work got him hooked the second time by deliberately blowing smoke in his face.
Lost a lung to the weed, and never really recovered his strength, although if you do the therapy you should get the other lung to compensate for its missing partner.
I know that for those with an addictive personality, you are never free of it, but can stay on top.
More power to your self control.

jack grebe
03-09-2011, 07:57 PM
just to add, i flushed what was left of my pack after my first post on this thread, 2.5 hrs and no one has been harmed so far... ;)


you rock

The Bigfella
03-09-2011, 11:16 PM
http://i66.photobucket.com/albums/h249/Wattner/Posters/wtwe5ktq52.jpg

PeterSibley
03-10-2011, 12:44 AM
CONGRATULATIONS!

I have been 100% nicotine-free since 6/6/94.

It is one of the toughest addictions to kick. Comparable to heroin.

For some , a lot worse , for some dead easy ....

goodbasil
03-10-2011, 02:38 AM
This is my post from April, 28/09, telling how I quit.

http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?96161-4-yrs.-Smoke-free&highlight=

jack grebe
03-10-2011, 07:02 AM
How we doing today Dryfoot??????


Don't let the addiction lie to you. Not even once...............

SchoonerRat
03-10-2011, 10:28 AM
GOOD JOB! YOUR BODY LOVES YOU FOR IT!

Quitting was about the toughest thing I ever did. I was mostly a 1 or 2 pack a day smoker with occasional periods where I was smoking 4 packs a day. For decades, the best I could do was to cut down for a month or so.

I haven't had a cig since the late '80s - There was only one thing that worked for me.

Stay away from smokers until your body can adapt to a nicotine free state.

Even now, when I'm around smokers, I feel my hand reaching into my shirt pocket.




I've gotta get away from this thread now!

goodbasil
03-13-2011, 05:20 PM
http://ca.shine.yahoo.com/healthy-living/dr-ozs-oneday-diet-blog-19-goodhousekeeping.html

This attitude may be a good one to take if one was trying to quit smoking.

htom
03-13-2011, 05:31 PM
A classmate really inspired me to keep on trying to quit at my 20th high school reunion. Greg, who'd become a heart-lung transplant surgeon, said that he knew I'd quit eventually. "How can you know that?" I asked. "No cigarette machines in coffins." he replied. Thanks, Greg.

Old Dryfoot
03-13-2011, 05:52 PM
Still sticking with it! And I smell so much better too! :D:D

bobbys
03-13-2011, 06:57 PM
You da Man Jack.

I quit 20 years ago as a 2 pack a day man, I stopped cold turkey, All my friends that kept smoking have died, In high school we wuz all cool cats and wore leather jackets and smoked Marboros, I believe Marboros must have a chemical in them that hooks you.

At any rate i was pretty skinny while smoking then gained weight after stopping.

I would rather smoke then eat when i smoked.

The biggest thing that helped me was holding toothpicks in my hand to occupy my hands, 20 years later i still need to always have a toothpick.

I wished i had Never ever picked up a smoke.

I have been known to linger near a cherry pipe smoker since quitting to catch a whiff..

Im the old guy i always hated when i see young people smoking i tell them to stop.

jack grebe
03-14-2011, 07:29 PM
Still sticking with it! And I smell so much better too! :D:D
WONDERFUL...................
I hope today went as well as yesterday, and tomorrow even better