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Paul Girouard
03-03-2011, 11:21 PM
Quite a job getting the stones in place and some different framing situations.


http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/PEG688/Mar32011Morell4.jpg


http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/PEG688/Mar32011Morell2.jpg


Stove goes in tomorrow.

The place is coming along nicely since Dec.

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/PEG688/Nov1820102.jpg

G. Schollmeier
03-04-2011, 01:35 AM
At least she’s high if not dry. Love the hearth.

PeterSibley
03-04-2011, 02:27 AM
That looks like a fun job Paul !

skuthorp
03-04-2011, 04:56 AM
Looks heavy Paul. Interesting cribbing, excavating under an existing structure I presume?

ishmael
03-04-2011, 05:01 AM
An open fireplace is inherently inefficient. Here in New England a fireplace developed that actually threw heat back into the space rather than simply sucking it up the chimney, but it still isn't anywhere near as efficient as a closed stove.

A Rumford. It has to do with the shape, the angle of the back, etc.

Good luck, Paul.

seanz
03-04-2011, 05:06 AM
That'll look interesting when it's done. Maybe even impressive......

Really nice to see the quality of the DF, looks a lot like the stuff I can get here. Fills me with hope and confidence..;)

Um, where's it from?

Ron Williamson
03-04-2011, 06:33 AM
Jack
It's likely for a zero clearance insert.
A guy can get doors for most of them.
I like odd rock work.
R

Paul Girouard
03-04-2011, 09:22 AM
Yes, gas fired "zero" clearance fireplace.

Western Washington D.Fir, not bad stuff , but quality of the wood is going down hill.

Yes, it was tall crawl space , about 4' in most places. Six weeks with a small Kabota excavator with a jack hammer attachment on it and a Bobcat to scoop out the rubble and you have a basement!

So making a two story house into a three story by going down instead of up. Not a cost effective way to get space , but it's a good job. Interesting anyway, different challenges.

Stove goes in today , although it's called a "zero" clearance stove , I know we'll have a few clearance issues getting the vent out of the house.

Rich Jones
03-04-2011, 10:07 AM
Seeing that plywood floor that it's going to sit on, I was hoping it was a zero clearance fireplace! Nice stone work, too.

Phillip Allen
03-04-2011, 10:16 AM
Jack
It's likely for a zero clearance insert.
A guy can get doors for most of them.
I like odd rock work.
R

as soon as I saw all the framing I knew it wasn't a real fireplace...maybe I shouldn't complain but people who go for appearance over function annoy me...sort of a function follows form attitude they have.

Still, when I still worked, I would do what the customer wanted if I couldn't talk him into something with more class

Paul Girouard
03-04-2011, 09:00 PM
as soon as I saw all the framing I knew it wasn't a real fireplace...maybe I shouldn't complain but people who go for appearance over function annoy me...sort of a function follows form attitude they have.

Still, when I still worked, I would do what the customer wanted if I couldn't talk him into something with more class




Your right , you shouldn't complain:-)) Besides that Joe CSOH job on my threads!!LOL!!

More class? So a wood stove or wood fireplace would be classier in your opinion?

As far a function this stove puts out31,000 BTU per hour with a 77.2 % efficiency rating with the blower on.

The face will be brushed nickle the face on here now is a temp install front for the mason to lay the stone to.

And Phillip could we have vented a wood fired stove this way out a rim joist with a small exterior cover?


http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/PEG688/Mar420111.jpg


http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/PEG688/Mar420116.jpg

Anyway it is what it is , a different look for a "GAS fireplace" I think it's pretty cool looking with the big stone hearth and soldiered / vertical stone on the side.

Ron Williamson
03-04-2011, 10:28 PM
I like it.
It's quirky,warm and doesn't cost 15k.
R
ps soldered?....soldiered?I'm guessing.

Paul Girouard
03-04-2011, 10:40 PM
I like it.
It's quirky,warm and doesn't cost 15k.
R
ps soldered?....soldiered?I'm guessing.


Yes, soldiered. Yet another way to spell a word right and still use the wrong word. Standing up right , commonly referred to around here as soldiering pieces.

Generally sheathing that run with the long side held vertically. Done to comply with the line in the code that reads "Nail all edges". In the ole days we ran our plywood horizontally / with the four foot seam running horizontally , today if you do that you have to solid block that seam. Using 9' or 10' OSB , generally, allows you to avoid that row of blocking, so you save $$ on material and labor by soldiering the sheathing. It also reduces thermal bridging of cold air across the blocking line, and avoids another potential air leak at the blocking line. So a win /win , meets code , reduces heat loss / cold transmittal.

More than you asked , but there it is.

Ron Williamson
03-04-2011, 10:51 PM
I figgered,but we generally use the term only for brickwork.
I've never seen horizontal wall sheathing.
Lots don't even use OSB anymore in favour of 1" foam with taped seams and windbracing behind.
R

Phillip Allen
03-04-2011, 11:03 PM
don't get upset Paul...it is very common for customers to not have a clue...ya gotta work with them anyway

the last high priced house I worked on involved a 4 car garage with a tarazo(sp) polished floor and three matching (black) Escalads...so the two toddlers wouldn't feel uncomfortable whether Dad, Mom or full time Opare('nother one I don't know the spelling for) was driving them around...flat screen TV in every room in the house so the kids could wonder around and not miss anything

Paul Girouard
03-04-2011, 11:05 PM
I've never seen horizontal wall sheathing.
Lots don't even use OSB anymore in favour of 1" foam with taped seams and windbracing behind.

R



Back east in RI we always ran the ply horizontally , staging the 8' seams , same out here until around 2003 when they adopted the IRC. Then that "Nail all edges" thing came along with the IRC,

In my thinking the staged seams at 4' gives you a stronger wall , but the Engineers who wrote the IRC think different I guess. And we use a LOT of nails today , some times 2"OC although 4" is most common for edge nailing.

Using that foam sheathing is for really cold weather places , I don't think it would pay off ever here in Western Washington , and it would create other isses for fastening exterior siding and such. You guys must have worked out the details on that aspect of the process.

Paul Girouard
03-04-2011, 11:09 PM
don't get upset Paul...it is very common for customers to not have a clue...ya gotta work with them anyway




I'm not even close to upset Phillip. Gas fireplaces are nice , I have a wood insert in my fireplace I burn nothing but cut offs / scrap from jobs. Nice heat , VERY DRY, this time of year in my house!!

Ya can't beat the cost ,,,, FREE wood!! If I had to buy wood and / or go cut and split logs , I'd convert to gas in a heart beat!