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View Full Version : Hey everyone, let's argue about this guy!



Dr. Arthur Trollingson
02-18-2011, 04:19 PM
I say he's obviously a world class climber, knows his limits (apparently he doesn't have any), and as such, isn't crazy, he's just willing to die young. What say you?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qt6aMoyd0To



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qt6aMoyd0To

S.V. Airlie
02-18-2011, 04:22 PM
Bloody heck..the Eiger! Nasty piece of rock..Read a book about the early climbers on that rock called The Day the Rope Broke.

Dr. Arthur Trollingson
02-18-2011, 04:45 PM
I'm assuming they headed back down the mountain when their rope broke?

That's what gets me about the guy in the video, his rope seems to be reserved for possible rescue scenarios.

S.V. Airlie
02-18-2011, 04:49 PM
I'm assuming they headed back down the mountain when their rope broke?

That's what gets me about the guy in the video, his rope seems to be reserved for possible rescue scenarios.

Actually no..one guy stuck his ax in the ice as he fell of the North Face..Was alive..wrapped himself in a sleeping bag and died..The sleeping bag dangled ( he was frozen solid by that time ) for I think 3 yrs. The tourists used to pay money on those stand binoculars just to look at him.

TerryLL
02-18-2011, 04:49 PM
The Banff Mountain Film Festival came to town a few weeks ago and the sub three-hour ascent of the Eiger was one of the featured films. This may be a record that lasts a long time, unless Ueli Steck breaks it himself. Kinda puts technical climbing up on a whole new level.

Paul Pless
02-18-2011, 04:50 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OX7p3jfr0mA

artif
02-18-2011, 04:56 PM
I spent a couple of hours sitting in a nice patio restaurant, having lunch and a couple of beers, across the valley from Eiger. It was a lovely summer day, and I had a good pair of binoculars with me. I couldn't imagine why anyone would want to climb the thing.

Same could be said about messing about with boats.
Personally I do both, plus a lot more, so probably not the best to comment
Awesome climb though.

S.V. Airlie
02-18-2011, 04:59 PM
Donn I think that is an easy one. The challenge and the excitment...

Paul Pless
02-18-2011, 05:01 PM
Donn I think that is an easy one. "because it's there"

Dr. Arthur Trollingson
02-18-2011, 05:01 PM
Actually no..one guy stuck his ax in the ice as he fell of the North Face..Was alive..wrapped himself in a sleeping bag and died..The sleeping bag dangled ( he was frozen solid by that time ) for I think 3 yrs. The tourists used to pay money on those stand binoculars just to look at him.

Wow, that really puts the morbid in morbid curiosity doesn't it.

Dr. Arthur Trollingson
02-18-2011, 05:02 PM
Paul wins the thread. That Osman guy is just plain nuts.

Paul Pless
02-18-2011, 05:04 PM
That Osman guy is just plain nuts.he's also dead

S.V. Airlie
02-18-2011, 05:06 PM
Wow, that really puts the morbid in morbid curiosity doesn't it.

Think about it..How many people glue themselves in to a police scanner and then rush off to say "Oh my, how terrible".

Dr. Arthur Trollingson
02-18-2011, 05:08 PM
he's also dead

Dang, I shoulda used the googles before commenting.

Here's his Wiki, if anyone's curious about the guys life.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Osman

wardd
02-18-2011, 05:12 PM
that looks easy

Dan McCosh
02-18-2011, 05:22 PM
He cheated. He's wearing gloves.

Dan McCosh
02-18-2011, 05:28 PM
I get acrophobia changing a light bulb.

Paul Pless
02-18-2011, 05:31 PM
I get acrophobia changing a light bulb.mast head light right?

Ian McColgin
02-18-2011, 05:45 PM
I admire most that he’s not such an ego hot shot that he won’t cancel a record for a higher cause. In May 2008 climbing Annapurna he broke off to assist a Spanish climber Iņaki Ochoa de Olza who had collapsed. Medical help was slow in coming and the Spanish climber died despite Steck's help.

He climbs with more hard put athleticism than I’d ever muster but his moves are beautiful. I also much admire the ergometrics of his picks and crampons.

Speed climbing, with the mostly helocopter ride home, is a bit like the use of jet skis for surfing - in both it makes possible feats that could not otherwise happen. The time has already come when the use of heleos is, like surf towing, used by people at challenges well below its justification. Nothing wrong with Steck, thought. Each generation has a new level of greatest and as Dan Brown gave way to Royal Robbins to Walter Bonnatti (so many left out) now we have Steck in a place unimaginable to climbers of my age.

And to still have the endurance and panache for the dash across that last arate . . .

botebum
02-18-2011, 06:02 PM
I can go a little further than the top of a 6' step ladder...If I put a misspelled word at the top of a 28 foot ladder, Donn would be up there in a heartbeat to fix it. Once corrected, his troubles might begin, but not before:D

Doug

Phillip Allen
02-18-2011, 07:14 PM
life is full of danger...it'll come to you anyway...I don't need to seek it out just to convince myself that my privates haven't fallen off

(how's that?)

stevebaby
02-18-2011, 07:25 PM
I'm assuming they headed back down the mountain when their rope broke?

That's what gets me about the guy in the video, his rope seems to be reserved for possible rescue scenarios.A bit quicker than they intended though.Excellent vid...this guy can really climb.
Climbing is a pretty safe activity if all the safety precautions are observed and a very quick and deadly one if they aren't.

Brian Palmer
02-18-2011, 07:57 PM
Dan Osman did that 400 climb at about 100 vertical feet per minute.

The fastest time running up the stairs to the observation deck of the Empire State Building in NYC (there is a race every year) is about 10 minutes, or also about 100 vertical feet per minute.

Really puts the Dan Osman speed climb in perspective.

Brian

Chris Coose
02-18-2011, 07:58 PM
Got into roped climbing before Yvon Chouinard invented the aluminum hex protection gear.
Like sailing, remained pretty satisfied in Northern New England.
Cannon and Chimney Pond are my favorites.
The Armadillo Flake (5.8) at Chimney Pond, Katadin is on the list for this summer.

Phillip Allen
02-18-2011, 07:59 PM
Dang, I shoulda used the googles before commenting.

Here's his Wiki, if anyone's curious about the guys life.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Osman

Darwin sez NO

Ron Williamson
02-18-2011, 08:00 PM
I saw the same Banff Mountain FF as TerryLL.
Dean Potter here, Free BASE Solo
http://www.broadbandsports.com/node/28001&gvsm=1
When you're done,you jump off the top.
R

Andrew Craig-Bennett
02-18-2011, 08:03 PM
Very good technical climber and very very fit, but no fool.

Not a case of "Don't try this at home", just "Don't try it".

S.V. Airlie
02-18-2011, 08:41 PM
I can go a little further than the top of a 6' step ladder, but I don't like it. It's improved since I had my eyes fixed, though. When I was younger, it didn't bother me at all. I did a lot of rock climbing in quarries and such. No more.

Donn you didn't read the warning plastered on the top step did ya?

peter radclyffe
02-18-2011, 10:04 PM
"because it's there"
hey come on guys, its not only because its there
its because they know its here ,there and everywhere
they do it for fame, not for themselves BY:D

Ian McColgin
02-18-2011, 10:11 PM
I rather like Woodrow Wilson Sayer's exegesis on Mallory. Along the lines of "Oh you ignorant jerk. There's no way you even begin to get the point of being there at the very limit of your humanity in the presence of the Universe's splendor so I'm just going to say something completely devoid of meaning that sounds so mystical that you'll stop bothering pushing your insensitive ignorance in my face." . . . "Because it's there."

Dr. Arthur Trollingson
02-19-2011, 02:39 AM
You guys disappoint me. Nobody's brought the man's sanity into question, nor has anyone speculated about the cost to taxpayers for removing him from a mountain in the off chance he is injured or killed by a mountain.

You've let me down, Bilge. I was told you were a pit filled with all that is vile and contemptuous.

Phillip Allen
02-19-2011, 06:33 AM
You guys disappoint me. Nobody's brought the man's sanity into question, nor has anyone speculated about the cost to taxpayers for removing him from a mountain in the off chance he is injured or killed by a mountain.

You've let me down, Bilge. I was told you were a pit filled with all that is vile and contemptuous.
I thought about it...along the lines of the blasting I took because I didn't wear a bicycle helmet and someone's insurance might go up because of it...but I didn't say anything

Ian McColgin
02-19-2011, 07:12 AM
Actually, the cost of rescue and the evolution of extreme sports is an interesting and multifaceted problem. But mountaineers like Ueli Steck, like big wave surfers such as Laird Hamilton, are not themselves the problem.

The problem is that advances in technology allow people to more easily get themselves into trouble that's harder to extricate them from. My mountaineering days ended in '81 so my understanding of advances since is as an observer. My generation benefited from the technological revolution so diverse - the Kelty pack frame, freeze dried light weight food, truely safe self-contained stoves, Choinard's brilliant blacksmithing, nuts for enhanced safety and preservation of rock, the one-point bivi for multi-day wall climbs, lightweight boots and cloths that preserve life in incredible weather . . . and on and on. Those technologies fueled more people probing more deeply into the mountains and higher along them. They made climbs like Rainier while hardly insignificant something the reasonably well schooled well conditioned climber could do after a couple of seasons learning. Now, if you can put one foot in front of another and have the cash, you can be atop Everest. Shades of 1880's nobility from England or Prussia or Italy shooting buffalo . . . from their private rail cars, enjoying champers and fresh lobster. Except now, so much is available to so many more folk not so rich.

Similar advances in sailing. Folk my age were part of the revolution that broke past the earlier rule of thumb that the solo voyager could not really handle more than 350 square feet per sail. Now children sail oceans in forty footers and some pretty goofy people get out, get in trouble, and pop the epirb.

To my mind, we need a more coherant ethic of risk. Rescue is morally important and at sea economically necessary - fishing and transport could not flourish without the effective subsidy of both state paid and volunteer life saving services. While I don't favor charging for rescue services, I think there should be circumstances where rescue is at the least not to be expected. There's the debate, since there's a lot of bodies and a lot of real jerks out there. If Steck is in trouble on a mountain, chances are no other human could help anyway and he'd just one guy who might be just as happy if his body is left where it lies anyway. But a half-dozen yahoos shepherded by a couple of money-grubbing guides of doubtful qualification (don't get me wrong, like charter captains, there are guides of great ability who use the business to provide for their own enjoyment and, like Captain Barnicle Bill there are plenty of river and mountain guides who are mass death awaiting an occasion) makes for some interesting environment and waste disposal problems.