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cs
01-03-2011, 08:25 PM
Just sitting here and enjoying a brewesky as I finish up my supper of Taco meat, Spanish Rice, refried beans and cheese on a bed of Fritos. Gotta have a beer with that right?

But anyway I went way in the back of the fridge and pulled out a pale ale by Kona Brewing Company, Fire Rock. Just a little bitter, not too much. It is a bit of a change from my normal Weis beirs, but good all the same.

http://www.disneyeveryday.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/Kona_Fire_Rock.JPG

Chad

SMARTINSEN
01-03-2011, 09:21 PM
Fix your [img] code, Chad. the first one is an "l" instead of an "i".

cs
01-03-2011, 09:28 PM
Thank you. Didn't know I did that. Must be the beer.

Chad

cs
01-03-2011, 09:36 PM
Well I guess now we will move on to the "Original" Pale Ale, Drifter.

http://blog.oregonlive.com/thebeerhere/2009/01/medium_Drifter_BtlPour.jpg

Chad

SMARTINSEN
01-03-2011, 09:40 PM
Must be the beer. :D

Now I am thirsty.

cs
01-03-2011, 09:42 PM
If you want my opinion, Fire Rock is just a bit better than Drifter. I've got another in the fridge if you want it.

Chad

Stiletto
01-04-2011, 04:44 PM
As I have grown older, my taste in beer has drifted towards the bitter types. I have seen neither of those brands before.

cs
01-04-2011, 06:47 PM
I find them at the local grocery store in the import/specialty section. You might like the Fire Rock. I actually prefer their Longboard Island Lager.



Exceptionally Smooth
Longboard Island Lager is a smooth refreshing lager fermented and aged for five weeks at cold temperatures to yield its exceptionally smooth flavor. A delicate, slightly spicy hop aroma complements the malty body of this beer.

http://lh5.ggpht.com/_nOm5Vh3OsLE/TDK-35c3BiI/AAAAAAAAAHM/gk6Nj5qHA0Y/s1600/lngbrd_bottle_pour-jpg1.jpeg

Chad

Joe (SoCal)
01-04-2011, 06:51 PM
I must say your brew palet is improving. Gone are the days of the Budwizer imitation micro brew your drinking proper beer now.

cs
01-04-2011, 07:31 PM
Joe I haven't drank Budweiser for a very long time. There for a long time I was drinking Coors, but after a trip to Germany I switched to a more of a weis type beer and have never looked back. Still not a fan of dunkels though.

Chad

Obi Wan Kenobi
01-04-2011, 07:38 PM
I am a big fan of this bitter tasting beer, in my opinion this is the best beer in the world.
1275

cs
01-04-2011, 07:49 PM
That picture is a little small. I can't tell what it is.

Chad

stumpbumper
01-04-2011, 07:55 PM
Grolsch-Premium Lager

cs
01-04-2011, 08:03 PM
Well I just happen to have one Longboard left in the fridge. Guess I will have to go ahead and drink. Please, quit twisting my arm.

I can't bring myself to try the Harvest Moon Pumpkin Ale that the wife bought back in Oct and which most is still sitting in the fridge.

http://www.fermentnation.com/pics/bluemoon_harvestmoon.jpg

Chad

skipper68
01-04-2011, 08:06 PM
SOOO, what ya think? Is it a get it,or a dont? Just wondering-

cs
01-04-2011, 08:09 PM
No Joe I wasn't a big fan of Landshark, although I did try and it was okay. I may have mentioned it here because of the Jimmy tie in, but I only ended up buying the one six pack. BTW I don't think Blue Moon is anything like Coors, much better in my opinion.

All the ones I mention here, Drifter, Fire Rock & Longboard, are all worth getting. I prefer the Longboard of those three. Just me though, mileage may vary.

Chad

skipper68
01-04-2011, 08:09 PM
Blue Moon is CoorsOK,so a friend showed up with a 12pk of blue moon,and the labels were upside down a few years ago. Any value? I still have them emptys.?.

cs
01-04-2011, 08:12 PM
Original shot.. packaged on June 24 2008. A little old for bottled beer, even in green glass.

Web photo not mine.

Chad

John Meachen
01-05-2011, 03:40 PM
Original shot.. packaged on June 24 2008. A little old for bottled beer, even in green glass.

Please explain the significance of age on bottled beer.I would expect a pasteurised beer to keep almost indefinitely unless the cap corrodes and the seal is breached.A bottle conditioned beer might well improve with age and when a local pub kept some Adnams Broadside in a barrel for two years,it was a smoother beer as a result.I would have thought the real challenge is to resist opening a bottle for a great length of time.

BrianY
01-05-2011, 04:03 PM
Please explain the significance of age on bottled beer.I would expect a pasteurised beer to keep almost indefinitely unless the cap corrodes and the seal is breached.A bottle conditioned beer might well improve with age and when a local pub kept some Adnams Broadside in a barrel for two years,it was a smoother beer as a result.I would have thought the real challenge is to resist opening a bottle for a great length of time.

assuming the beer is pasturized, the three 'enemies" of bottled beer are light exposure, oxidation and extremes of temperature in that order.

The interaction of light with beer produces a chemical reaction that results in what is commonly referred to as 'skunkiness". That's one of the major reasons why those mexican Lagers taste the way they do...and probably why they're served with a lime wedge. Green glass bottles are a little better than clear at preventing this reaction and brown bottles are best. Still, some light does penetrate the brown bottles, so given enough time and exposure, the beer will start to skunk.

Bottle caps are not entirely impervious to the exchange of internal and external gases. Over long periods, the infiltration of oxygen will cause the beer to oxidize - which can result in an improvement in the beer's flavor (more on that in a bit) but when taken too far, will ultimately produce all sorts of off flavors.

Extremes of temperature can also affect the taste. Storage in an unairconditioned room over a couple of summers and winters may have a significant effect on the flavor depending on the climate

As for bottle conditioned beers - yes they do improve with age - some of them dramatically so - but there is a limit. Beers brewed to typical strengths generally reach their peak of flavor in 2-3 months, stay pretty consistent for another 2-3 months and then begin to decline. Year-old bottle conditioned home brew ususally has a slightly cidery, fruity character to it that only gets worse with age.

Strong beers (i.e. high alcohol brews) like old ales and barley wines do improve with long aging. For example, I think the recommended aging for Old Peculiar is three years or more. But again, this is not infinite. Oxidation and other factors will eventually spoil the taste - as it does in wine.

As forthe Adnams Broadside - if it was the cask version of the beer, then it was the 6.3% alcohol "Strong Original" (the bottled version is different - 4.3% alcohol). As such, the beer would be up to a long aging and would benefit from the oxidation that inevitably takes place in wooden casks. Harsh alcohol and hop bitterness notes that would be present in the "young beer" would mellow and as you said, it would be a better tasting brew...but once again, there is a limit as to how long this beneficial mellowing can continue - espicially in wooden casks which are very porous to oxygen infiltration.

Edited to add: The Adnams may not have been in a wooden cask. It could have been in a stainless steel keg (I don't know how Adnam's "casks" their beer). The more I think about it, the more likely it seems to me that it was a stainless steel keg - 2 years is a long - but not impossible, I suppose- time for non-pasturized beer to improve in a wooden keg. In any case, if it was in a stainless keg, then the mellowing of the flavors was due to normal reactins between the various components in the beer and oxidation probably was not a factor.

Stiletto
01-05-2011, 06:06 PM
http://www.ratebeer.com/beerimages/71671.jpg

I've been drinking this lately. Referred to by some as pensioner p!ss because of the price and volume.

I wouldnt drink it if I didnt like it, and I'm not a snob about glass bottles.:p

L.W. Baxter
01-05-2011, 09:12 PM
on a bed of Fritos.

I'm glad you are drinking a classy beer to go with that.:d

As coincidence would have it, I am drinking a Longboard right now. I also regularly drink Drifter. I'm impressed that Drifter is available out your way, I did not know that Widmer beers were really that well distributed.

cs
01-05-2011, 09:24 PM
Our local grocery store has a pretty good selection of "specialty" beers. I've even seen some San Miguel around here, not often but occasionally.

Which do you prefer, Longboard or Drifter? Have you tried the Fire Rock?

I did notice that Kona Brewing has a couple of others I would like to try. Waliua Wheat Ale is one of them.


This golden ale has a bright citrusy flavor from tropical passion fruit.

And Big Wave Golden Ale


Big Wave is a light golden ale with a subtle fruitiness and delicate hop aroma.

And I guess I will have to go to Hawaii to try the Hula Hefeweizen being as it is only available in draft.


Hula Hefeweizen is a traditional Bavarian-style weissbier that is medium to full bodied with a pronounced banana / herbal flavor and aroma. This unique flavor profile is a result of the special type of yeast strain used to brew this beer.

Chad

L.W. Baxter
01-05-2011, 09:38 PM
Which do you prefer, Longboard or Drifter?

I like variety. I tend to buy whatever is slightly cheaper out of the "craft beer" section at the store. I get a regular rotation that way.

cs
01-05-2011, 09:41 PM
We have a World Market here and you can build your own six pack. A lot of times they carry pre-packaged variety packs. I've done both. It is good for experimenting and seeing which you prefer.

Chad

Paul Pless
01-05-2011, 09:44 PM
Chad, for a smallish city in the south, y'all also have a really good microbrewery. Do you know if they do growlers?

cs
01-05-2011, 09:48 PM
You talking about that place we ate when you were here? I believe that was Big River. I'm not sure about growlers. In fact that is a new term to me. Tell me more about growlers.

Chad

Paul Pless
01-05-2011, 09:50 PM
growler

http://besenretail.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/growler.jpg?w=311&h=600

They usually come in .5 gallon to 1.5 gallon sizes, and are refillable at microbreweries.

cs
01-05-2011, 09:55 PM
I don't know I will check into that next time I go down there.

BTW your mention of it was only the second time I had heard of a Growler. I saw one on the Kona brewing site yesterday when looking for pictures of Fire Rock and Longboard. So this growler is just about the same as a pitcher but in bottle form?

Chad

Stiletto
01-06-2011, 04:23 AM
When I lived in Aussie in the seventies, I saw 'stubbies' for the first time. Short and fat, like my old boss. 330-375ml bottles.(around 12fl oz.}

Then there were Darwin stubbies which really fired the imagination of a Kiwi drinking boy. 80 fluid oz!
Finally, something the Aussies did right!

cs
01-17-2011, 08:26 PM
Just in case anyone was wondering, tonight was for Pete's Wicked Strawberry Blonde.

http://justbeer.files.wordpress.com/2008/06/petes-wicked-strawberry-blonde-medium-web-view.jpg

Chad

Captain Intrepid
01-17-2011, 08:44 PM
I could really go for some bitter right now. I need to go pick up a sixer of Propeller Extra Special Bitter.